3 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2020
    1. As someone who writes social media for work, I am deeply rooted in the practice of writing a unique intro when I share a post to Twitter, not directly syndicating it with whatever text I started the article with. For me that feels good enough (not saving that unique share to my site) since including the link means any likes and comments about the article come back to my blog thanks to Bridgy, but maybe someone will convince me otherwise ;)

      I'll often share articles to Twitter and don't necessarily do a 1-to-1 match of the syndicated copy on Twitter. Usually I'll excerpt a piece that ends up appearing on Twitter with a link back to the article. I generally presuppose that if they're interested, they'll click through and read otherwise they're bookmarking it or sharing the link with others, so those interactions coming back to the original are always fine with me.

    1. receiving webmentions for syndicated copies

      I've done a poor man's version of this on websites that don't send webmentions, but which will let me put the permalink of my original from my site on them (either in a website field, or into the text of the comment and which don't filter out the HTML).

      In particular, I've done it on WordPress.com sites and put my reply from my site into their standard comment field and indicated to notify me by email of future comments.

      Then when I get the email notification, I can force a manual webmention of the reply and get something back to my website. In practice, it also requires a bit of massaging, but is better than nothing.

      I've documented the process here: https://boffosocko.com/2020/01/30/manual-backfeed-in-the-blogosphere/

    1. My hope is that it will somehow bring comments on Facebook back to the blog and display them as comments here.

      Sadly, Aaron Davis is right that Facebook turned off their API access for this on August 1st, so there currently aren't any services, including Brid.gy, anywhere that allow this. Even WordPress and JetPack got cut off from posting from WordPress to Facebook, much less the larger challenge of pulling responses back.