44 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2022
    1. https://lindylearn.substack.com/p/lindylearn-reflections-roadmap-and

      Some interesting ideas to watch here.

      I remember a Twitter app service that was built around Twitter lists that I was an early user of, but I'm not able to find it now. I'm not sure if it's even still around after Twitter killed off a lot of their API access years ago.

    1. Moving my (web) reading list to sticky notes because I never remember to check it on my computer.

      Wall with stickie note sized print outs taped to it. They contain a QR code, presumably linking to the thing they want to read with a Title and author below it.

    1. https://web.archive.org/web/20081030052305/http://www.solutionwatch.com/368/fifty-ways-to-take-notes/

      Mostly an historical list of online tools for note taking.

      No discussion of actual functionality or usefulness. Sounds more like for making to do lists and passing notes rather than long term knowledge management and upkeep. Nothing about the benefits of centralizing data in one place.

      meh...

  2. Nov 2021
    1. Twitter Blue Publisher network

      Hey Twitter,

      I love that you chose to show support for Lists by sharing the list of Blue publishers, this way. This is a decision I want to celebrate!

      However, this hyperlink isn’t particularly useful in that the user has no ability to actually follow the list. Aside from manually bookmarking it on a browser (since you can’t if you let the deeplink open the native app,) there is no way to save it!

  3. Oct 2021
    1. Lynne Kelly's excellent book Memory Craft (Pegasus, 2020) has 6 pages of Appendix A which lists 31 memory methods along with examples, what they might be used for, and references to where they're described in the book. It's one of the most comprehensive lists I've seen to date and in particular covers a variety of methods used by indigenous cultures which aren't discussed in many other (Western focused) texts.

  4. Aug 2021
    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G4Qsu03Oz30

      This same sort of functionality is something I'd built into my TiddlyWiki ages ago. Interesting to see some of these same sorts of functionalities being built into other note taking tools.

      Sort of makes me want to consider nested tags in Obsidian...

  5. Jul 2021
    1. So long as the filters are only using GET requests to pull down links, there’s nothing fundamentally wrong with them. It’s a basic (though oft-ignored) tenet of web development that GET requests should be idempotent; that is, they shouldn’t somehow change anything important on the server. That’s what POST is for. A lot of people ignore this for convenience’s sake, but this is just one way that you can get bitten. Anyone remember the Google Web Accelerator that came out a while ago, then promptly disappeared? It’d pre-fetch links on a page to speed up things if you clicked them later on. And if one of those links happened to delete something from a blog, or log you out… well, then you begin to see why GET shouldn’t change things. So yes, the perfect solution to this is a 2-step unsubscribe link: the first step takes to you a page with a form on it, and that form then POSTs something back that finalizes the unsubscribe request.
    2. Two step unsubscribe, where the link in the email goes to a webpage with a prominent “click here to unsubscribe” button is often a good thing for unsubscription. It also gives people an option to not unsubscribe, when they click on the wrong link, or hit “return” with the wrong link focused, in a mail inadvertently, which isn’t that unusual in link-laden emails.
  6. Jun 2021
    1. registrants

      Not comprehensive of all registrants or participants, but here's the start of a Twitter list of people who participated for those interested:

      https://twitter.com/i/lists/1407022653693587459/members

      Do let me know if you've been missed or would like to be added.

  7. May 2021
    1. So The Screener really just acts as a second layer of consent—almost like a confirmed opt in.
    2. The difference is that this happens in the email client, not at the subscription step. Why is this a big deal? Because, even though they just subscribed to your email, there’s a chance your email won’t get a thumbs up.
  8. Apr 2021
  9. Feb 2021
    1. Personal todo lists don’t depend on others using the same system (no network effects)

      They don't unless you're building a wiki or commonplace book that can interact with those of others. (Roam research isn't doing this---yet, but they should.) Ideally small building block pieces will allow it to dovetail with other systems that could potentially do the same thing.

    1. We got this email from Parabo, the print shop app, and smiled. Instead of the very standard “Please confirm subscription” header text, we were greeted with a funny, whimsical hello that’s totally in their brand voice. “We really want you to want us” is a clever way to break up the usual mundane greeting, and, guess what? It totally reaffirmed why we thought we wanted to sign up for their emails in the first place.
    1. The blog A Life Of Productivity uses double opt-ins to make sure that people signing up for the email newsletter really want to read it. If a site visitor was somehow subscribed by accident, the subscription won’t go through unless they click the verification button sent to their email address.<img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-32479" src="https://www.convinceandconvert.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/A-Life-of-Productivity.jpg" alt="A Life of Productivity" width="724" height="549" />
  10. Jan 2021
    1. We could change the definition of Cons to hold references instead, but then we would have to specify lifetime parameters. By specifying lifetime parameters, we would be specifying that every element in the list will live at least as long as the entire list. The borrow checker wouldn’t let us compile let a = Cons(10, &Nil); for example, because the temporary Nil value would be dropped before a could take a reference to it.
  11. Sep 2020
    1. Chapter 10Lists

      like a strings here lists is a sequence of values in a list that may be any type this values in a list are called elements and list can have different data types Strings are need to be given in single or double codes.And also Strings are immutable which means a string cannot be updated.And another important topic from strings is Slicing of a string which means we can obtain the substring from the given string by following a syntax.

      • . list means it is a sequence of values.
      • .In a list we can store any type of values not like strings.
      • A list can be created easily by storing the values in square brackets.
      • We can do different types of operations in list like we can do concatenation.
      • List indices work the same way as string indices: 1-any integer expression can be used as an index. 2-if you try to read or write a element that does nt exist,you get an index error.
      • List slices ,list are mutable
      • in list to delete any type of variables we can use del,pop,remove.
      • The association of a variable with an object is called a reference.
      • MAP-a processing pattern that traverse a sequence and performs an operation on each element.
      • With lists we can perform different types of operations.
  12. May 2020
    1. Under CAN-SPAM, the ability to unsubscribe should be free and should not be behind a login process. This means that users must be able to unsubscribe without paying a fee and without needing to log into their account to do so
    2. With this method, you can ensure the email address receiving your communication actually belongs to the person giving the consent and hereby further ensure that you avoid high unsubscribe rates, retain the integrity of your list and the reputation of your address. This method of registration is considered best practice in many countries, especially Germany and in the EU in general.
  13. Mar 2020
    1. ol { counter-reset:item; } li { display:block; } li:before { content:counter(item) '. '; counter-increment:item; }
  14. Feb 2020
  15. Jan 2020
    1. Black artists and cultural leaders have been compiling documents of this sort since the 1700s, first as part of an ongoing argument against White supremacy and slavery. Later, during Reconstruction, as a reminder to the newly literate Black population “that they were not alone.” Later still, to catalog the abundance of the Harlem Renaissance

      I'd love to have copies of these lists. Or perhaps even an anthology of works that appear on them?

      Perhaps it would be useful to publish an entire series of these works under a bigger banner? Perhaps an OER edition that could be shared?

  16. Mar 2019
    1. 7 things you should know about This page offers two lists of technologies. One relates to learning technologies and the other to campus IT. In either case, one clicks "see all" and is shown a list of many up and coming technologies. One can click the links to get a discussion of seven things the user should know about these technologies. Reports are two pages and follow a set format that includes a brief story or illustration. These introduce the visitor to the use of the technology but do not provide extensive explanation; it is an introduction. Technologies listed on these pages are often but not always technologies that the average instructional designer may put to use. Rating: 3/5

    1. This page is a simply presented list of many learning theories, both popular and less well known. The layout is clean. The pages to which the listed items link are somewhat minimal in nature so this would give a basic tour or overview of the models and would allow viewers to review the names of some of the learning theories. This page does not prioritize learning theories or identify and establish those theories that are the most prominent.

  17. Feb 2019
    1. <ul>   <li>Coffee</li>  <li>Tea</li>   <li>Milk</li> </ul>

      Basic List. If you change the

        ...
      to
        ...
      you will get an ordered list

  18. Dec 2018
  19. Mar 2018
    1. Knoll workstation fabric panel, 3'6" by 2', with crepe Knoll workstation fabric panel, 3'6" by 2'6", with crepe Knoll workstation fabric panel, 3'6" by 3'6", with crepe BPI workstation 1/2 plexiglass panel, 5'6" by 2'6"

      List of objects: connection to The Pale King and Zero Kerning by Craig Dworkin

      Similar goal? Collecting to detach from original function?

  20. Feb 2018
  21. Nov 2017
  22. Jul 2017
  23. Mar 2017
    1. In commenting on the development of H-Net, a consortium of close to 100 scholarlydiscussion groups with a collective membership of over 50,000 participants, Peter Knupfer,the organization’s associate director explained the value of the SDG.Knupfer (1996)notedthat SDGs have brought the information revolution to the desktops of working scholarsaround the world. SDGs have not only increased the opportunities for scholars to conversewith each other, they have pried open previously restricted fields of editing and informationmanagement. Through SDGs, the Internet is best exploited as a collective enterprise byacademics and teachers who mediate an environment many regard as forbidding and hostile.As an example of this power, H-Net is particularly illustrative of how an internationalconsortium of scholars can use these electronic networks to advance humanities and socialscience teaching and research

      Claims about the power of SDGs

  24. Feb 2017
    1. The first is properest for, dissuading; Che second, as halh been already hinted, for pcrsuad· ing; the third is equally accommodated to both.

      Summary: "The First" = the "inert, torpid" passions like "sorrow, fear, shame"

      "The second" = passions that "elevate the soul" and move to action, like "hope, patriotism, ambition"

      "The third" = passions that are "intermediate" and can go either way, such as "joy, love, esteem and compassion"

  25. Aug 2015
  26. Mar 2015