4 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2019
    1. such as analyzing and evaluating concepts, processes, procedures, and principles, rather than just remembering facts (rote learning)

      different from UbD in this way

  2. Mar 2019
    1. This is Bloom's taxonomy of cognitive objectives. I selected this page because it explains both the old and new versions of the taxonomy. When writing instructional objectives for adult learning and training, one should identify the level of learning in Blooms that is needed. This is not the most attractive presentation but it is one of the more thorough ones. rating 4/5

    1. This is one of many pages that lists verbs at various levels of Bloom's old taxonomy (verb lists for the new version are easy to find as well). This one has green bars across the page so may not be best for those who are trying to preserve ink though it is easy and attractive to use if referring to it on the screen. Rating 4/5

  3. Jan 2019
    1. To be considered knowledgeable, all you need to do is remember what you learn, understand what you learn, and then apply what you learn.

      I agree with Sean’s critique here insofar as he’s - to my reading - warning against a vision of learning that’s more concerned with mass complacency than individual critical thinking. Yet I find Bloom’s Taxonomy to be a helpful launch point. For instance, I think it’s important for teachers to help students remember what they’ve previously learned in order to build on that knowledge. I think building knowledge does require recall; otherwise, new information remains in isolation. The problem arises when teachers and students alike do not engage in the more complex acts of analyzing and evaluating. For me, when I’m (co)designing a lesson, I return to Bloom not as a tablet delivered from on high, but as a taxonomy of possibility, a collection of verbs that stimulates my own thinking about the types of learning that might happen in a certain class with a specific set of students.