4 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2019
    1. simply to repeat,

      'Simple' repetition is one way to look at it, but Muckelbauer's Future of Invention provides an entirely different take on the value of repetition, of reproducing. Though both Quintilian and Erasmus return to similar ground again and again, they and the layout of the land are not precisely as they were before.

    2. paideia

      A paideia is similar in concept (though not identical to) to our idea of a curriculum or pedagogy; it's essentially a course of study that a Greek youth would begin at a young age and continue into their late teens. Interestingly, it is a holistic program, one that encompasses all areas of intellectual and physical pursuit. Quintilian's 12-volume Institutes of Oratory, referenced here, is a kind of instruction book for such a program. As Lanham notes, the goal here was to ultimately cultivate a virtuous, learned man that might participate productively in political life.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paideia

  2. Nov 2013
    1. I propose to under-take against Quintilian, for I shall undertake to teach that his instructions on oratory were not correctly ordered, organized, described - es-pecially so since he seems to define an orator brilliantly at the start, then to divide elegantly the parts of the subjects covered by the definition and finally to delineate the property and nature of each part with extreme care and accuracy.
    2. Cicero seems to have spoken in an age of gold, Quin-tilian in an age of iron. But nevertheless, com-pared to the eloquent men of that time, he was without doubt counted among the eloquent.

      Cicero mastered eloquence but Quintilian was also eloquent.