14 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2019
    1. and the whole is really the flower of wisdom)

      Vico seems to be opposed, then, to highly specialized education and in favor of breadth of knowledge. This has echoes of Aristotle and Cicero.

    1. genius or observation

      Not, though, through book learning (unless that counts as observation?).

      Calls again to Cicero's discussion of art, where the 'rules' come from observed and practiced successes (not handbooks)

  2. Jan 2019
    1. recede the media concepts they generate

      This brings to mind Cicero's De Oratore, where Crassus discusses art (in the sense of a skill, systematic knowledge of a particular field) and eloquence. Instead of a theory of rhetoric/oratory leading to eloquence, "certain people have observed and collected the practices that eloquent men have followed of their own accord. Thus, eloquence is not the offspring of art, but art [is the offspring] of eloquence." The skill itself always precedes the systematization of the skill.

    1. Seneca

      Cicero also identifies writing as essential in De Oratore. It crops up a few times, but one of them is in Book I, section 150 or so.

  3. Aug 2018
    1. Cicero, always intensively studied for thelight his work sheds on the chaotic political developments of the 60sthrough the 40s BCEand on Hellenistic philosophy, has recently foundmore readers for his rhetorical and political theory.

      New emphasis on "rhetorical and political theory" in Cicero.

    2. Cicero is not principally concerned inhis rhetorical writings with the ethical formation of the privateindividualbut with a civic ideal

      Public > Private

    3. If philosophy maybe “divided into three branches, natural philosophy, dialectic, andethics,” Cicero declares in his dialogue de Oratore (On the Orator), “letus relinquish the first two,” but, he continues, rhetoric must lay claim toethics, “which has always been the property of the orator; . . . this area,concerning human life and customs, he must master” (1.68).

      Ethics.

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  4. Mar 2017
    1. turning my pale plaster-of-paris bust of Cicero out of doors.

      I'm guessing that the character of Cicero might have some reflection to play in these parts. I'd have to research further to draw up a conclusion.

  5. Jun 2015
    1. effeminate Roman noblemen in Ciceronian invective

      Just a note that Cicero uses smell a LOT in De Oratore. He describes the orator, in fact, as a hunting-dog tracking down the scent of an audience in DO 1.223. It makes more sense to me now how that particular sensation might be relevant to audience identification, particularly in the context of porphura.

  6. Nov 2013
    1. Cicero seems to have spoken in an age of gold, Quin-tilian in an age of iron. But nevertheless, com-pared to the eloquent men of that time, he was without doubt counted among the eloquent.

      Cicero mastered eloquence but Quintilian was also eloquent.

    2. In fact I shall not only gladly but also perhaps truly admit that of all the men who are, have been, and will in the future be, he was the most eloquent.

      regarding Cicero: Yep, me too.

  7. Oct 2013
    1. I might reply to this in the words of Cicero, in whom I find this passage: "In my opinion, no man can become a thoroughly accomplished orator unless he shall have attained a knowledge of every subject of importance and of all the liberal arts," but for my argument, it is sufficient that an orator be acquainted with the subject on which he has to speak

      knowledge with all things, knowledge with which one speaks

    2. Cicero, too, in one passage, calls the material of oratory the topics which are submitted to it for discussion, but supposes that particular topics only are submitted to it.

      reference to Cicero