146 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2020
    1. Anomie (/ˈænəˌmi/) is a "condition in which society provides little moral guidance to individuals".[1] It is the breakdown of social bonds between an individual and the community, e.g., under unruly scenarios resulting in fragmentation of social identity and rejection of self-regulatory values.

      I can't help but see this definition and think it needs to be applied to economics immediately. In particular I can think of a few quick examples of economic anomie which are artificially covering up a free market and causing issues within individual communities.

      College Textbooks: Here publishers are marketing to professors who assign particular textbooks and subverting students which are the actual market and consumers of those textbooks. This causes an inflated market and has allowed textbook prices to spiral out of control.

      The American Health Care Market In this example, the health care providers (doctors, hospitals, etc.) have been segmented away from their consumers (patients) by intermediary insurance companies which are driving the market to their own good rather than a free-er set of smaller (and importantly local) markets that would be composed of just the sellers and the buyers. As a result, the consumer of health care has no ability to put a particular price on what they're receiving (and typically they rarely ever ask, even more so when they have insurance). This type of economic anomie is causing terrific havoc within the area.

      (Aside: while the majority of health care markets is very small in size (by distance), I will submit that the advent of medical tourism does a bit to widen potential markets, but this segment of the market is tiny and very privileged in comparison.)

  2. Sep 2020
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  9. Jan 2020
    1. The thing with the HRIA was that as a condition of receiving funding, all the work, including work in progress, had to be submitted to a searchable database so that everyone else receiving funding could see the work and use it to advance their own work—because above anything else, we had a mandate to get advances and therapies to the patients as quickly as possible. The HRIA still allowed for patent filings, but everything, everything, was cross-licensed for the length of the patent, for a statutory fee that went into effect only after a product went to market.

      As Sci-Fi does, the myriad variables are expertly set by the author. The way this world is constructed, tho, feels so very familiar & in a way that seems beyond the norm for comparably radical imaginings.

  10. Dec 2019
  • Oct 2019
  • Sep 2019
    1. Get the portable eyewash station from MONSAM Portable Sinks. They offer a wide range of portable sinks for health and beauty, these portable shampoo bowls are ideal for homes, barber shops, beauty salons and health care facilities.

  • Apr 2019
  • gutenberg.net.au gutenberg.net.au
    1. quack

      Very few controls existed on medical practice in Regency England. In fact, the UK equivalent of the FDA, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, wasn't even established until 2003. Consequently, "quack medicine" and unusual, ineffective treatments for illnesses were often prescribed to patients by poorly trained and unqualified physicians.

      Read more about Georgian quack medicine here

    2. It acts on me like poison

      Here, Arthur's reference to green tea as "poison" is strange even to Charlotte. Yet green tea is confirmed to be popular in England in the 1800s. In support of Arthur's point, a text called Ms. Beeton's Book of Household Management published in 1807, which includes many recipes for various beverages, noted that "strong green tea is highly pernicious [harmful], and should never be partaken of too freely."

      https://qmhistoryoftea.wordpress.com/2015/02/25/englands-green-and-pleasant-tea/

    3. sea air

      Sea air was actually shown to be a remedy to various illnesses in the 18th century. But, this was not commonly believed along the entire medical community.

      https://books.google.com/books?id=NSHa5u76G08C&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

    4. nervous

      Nervousness was considered a "popular disease" in the late 18th century. Most commonly discussed and found in the middle and elite class. Many people of higher class were said to have bad "nerves" or "nervousness" because there was no clear definition of a nervous disorder at the time.

      https://muse.jhu.edu/article/680400

    5. surgeon

      In Jane Austen’s time, or the early part of the 19th century, there was a clear distinction between a doctor, surgeon, and apothecary.

      Doctors and physicians occupied the highest rung on the social ladder. Such citizens could still be considered "upper class" because 1) their training did not include apprenticeship and 2) the profession excluded, supposedly, manual labor

      Because surgeons actually treated the patient by performing physical labor – a trade, so to speak – they occupied a lower rung on the social ladder.

      Apothecaries, who learned their profession through apprenticeship and who were definitely considered to be in “trade," ranked even lower on the social scale.

      Read more here

    6. month at Tunbridge Wells

      Famous mineral spring used to cure ailments. https://www.visittunbridgewells.com/

    7. whooping cough

      Whooping cough is a highly contagious respiratory tract infection, characterized by uncontrollable coughing. In Jane Austen's time, there was no prevention method (ex. vaccine) or cure to prevent whooping cough, hence why Jane herself suffered from it. Rather than consulting a physician for treatment, she used home remedies concocted by her friend and sister-in-law, Martha Lloyd.

      Source

    8. "We are always well stocked," said he, "with all the common remedies for sprains and bruises

      Since medical professionals were rare, expensive, and not terribly helpful, many women learned basic nursing skills to care for their own families, and had their own home remedies, too.

      Source

    9. asses' milk

      From as far back as ancient Egypt, the health benefits of donkey's milk has been recognized. This milk supposedly is "anti-inflammatory and hypoallergenic" and has vitamins and probiotics that make it a more nutritious drink than other animal milk.

      https://foodtravelist.com/donkey-milk-health-benefits/

      Many cultures believed that the nutrients from the milk aided in the prevention of and recovery from diseases.

      https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780128097625000310

    10. physic

      Physic is a dated term that, in this context, refers broadly to "medicinal drugs."

      https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/physic

    11. consumptive

      Consumption is another name for tuberculosis (TB), which is a serious bacterial disease of the lungs. In the 19th century, there were no cures or effective treatments for consumption, making it one of the leading causes of death and a serious fear.

      https://www.lung.org/about-us/blog/2016/01/how-we-conquered-consumption.html

    12. evil lay in her gum

      It is possible Susan was suffering from a headache caused by clenching her teeth or from having sensitive jaw or neck muscles. It is not, and has never been, a legitimate cure to extract teeth as a result. This extreme measure highlights that the Parkers are hypochondriacs.

      https://migrainepal.com/treatments-clenching-grinding-headache-and-migraine/

    13. friction by the hand alone

      Cross friction massage therapy is an actual medical technique for sprained ankles where one applies pressure to the injured ankle using one's hand. This breaks down scar tissue, which would prolong the healing process. Usually, this technique is done a few days after the injury, not immediately as Diana suggests.

      https://collegeofmassage.com/toronto/2013/08/sprained-ankles-and-massage-therapy/

    14. spasmodic bile

      Bile is a bodily fluid that is produced by the liver to help the small intestine digest food. It is possible that Diana is suffering from a condition called Sphincter of Oddi Dysfunction (SOD) where bile gets intermittently backed up between the liver and small intestine resulting in severe and seemingly random abdominal pains.

      https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?ContentTypeID=134&ContentID=181

      Austen is most likely drawing upon her own grievances, as she often complained of "bilious attacks."

      https://mh.bmj.com/content/31/1/3

    15. point of death

      Hypochondria was recognized as a real condition during Austen's time. It was classified as a "nervous disorder," and tended to be reserved only to the elite of society. This seems to be the only illness of Susan, Diana, and Arthur.

      http://jasna.org/publications/persuasions-online/volume-38-no-2/darcy/

    16. sea bathing

      By the mid-18th century, swimming in the cold ocean was a standard therapy for illness or anxiety. The adrenaline from the shock of cold was thought to have soothing effects on the body, calming anxiety and restoring the body-soul balance.

    17. A little of our own bracing sea air will soon set me on my feet again

      18th century England obsessed over the health benefits of the seaside, especially as a cure for tuberculosis. This fascination led to the creation of resort towns, which later spread from England to the new world.

      https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/08/the-historic-healing-power-of-the-beach/279175/

    18. We have neither surgeon nor partner in the parish

      The partner of a surgeon is, in this context, the apothecary. Apothecaries were able to legally dispense medicine while surgeons could legally perform operations.

      https://books.google.com/books?id=Gm-N_969uekC&dq=surgeon+and+partner+jane+austen&source=gbs_navlinks_s

    19. tonic pills

      At the end of the 18th century, tonic pills were believed to be an effective form of dieting. After the extravagance of the Georgian period (especially George IV), it became fashionable and responsible to lose weight during the Regency period.

      https://www.historyextra.com/period/georgian/revealed-how-the-georgians-taught-us-to-diet-300-years-ago/

    20. anti-spasmodic, anti-pulmonary, anti-septic, anti-billious and anti-rheumatic
      1. spasmodic: characterized by spasms or convulsive twitches
      2. pulmonary: relating to lungs
      3. septic: putrefactive, putrefying
      4. billious: Affected by too great a secretion of bile, or from bilious derangement
      5. rheumatic: containing mucous or watery secretions

      www.oed.com

    21. sea air

      In 1753, Dr. Richard Russell popularized the idea that sea air was beneficial to one's health and nervous system in his writing A Dissertation Concerning the Use of Sea-Water in Diseases of the Glands. By the 19th century, it was generally accepted that the air, in addition to the actual water, had health benefits, but this belief was not backed by science.

      http://jasna.org/publications/persuasions-online/volume-38-no-2/darcy/

    22. Three teeth drawn at once—frightful!

      There were no licensed dentists during this period. General physicians extracted teeth and often without anesthetic, making it a very painful (and traumatizing?) process. This explains why Charlotte is so sympathetic towards Miss Parker.

      https://georgianera.wordpress.com/2015/02/05/18th-century-dentistry/

    23. any complaint which asses' milk could possibly relieve

      Donkey milk was considered a viable medical treatment from antiquity (Cleopatra bathed in it) until the turn of the 19th century, when it largely went out of fashion. It was considered a generic cure for a variety of conditions, including gout, scurvy, coughs, colds and asthma. For many, donkey milk caused stomach problems and "lactose intolerance."

      https://georgianera.wordpress.com/tag/asses-milk/

    24. I have a great idea of the efficacy of air

      Treatments for illness often relied on "fresh air" to clear impurities from the body.

      http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/h/health-and-medicine-in-the-19th-century/

    25. rheumatism

      Any disease marked by inflammation and pain in the joints, muscles, or fibrous tissue, especially rheumatoid arthritis.

  • Mar 2019
    1. Can an Evidence-Based Blended Learning Model Serve Healthcare Patients and Adult Education Students?

      Discusses the use of blended-learning incorporating technology especially for adult education programs that reduce education gaps and help the under-employed with career readiness. This also focuses in on adults with chronic disease and how online education might better support their needs. It uses constructivist leanings placing education in the context of activity and environment and recreating the correct environments online.

    1. Sharing of user data is routine, yet far from transparent. Clinicians should be conscious of privacy risks in their own use of apps and, when recommending apps, explain the potential for loss of privacy as part of informed consent. Privacy regulation should emphasise the accountabilities of those who control and process user data. Developers should disclose all data sharing practices and allow users to choose precisely what data are shared and with whom.

      Horrific conclusion, which clearly states that "sharing of user data is routine" where the medical profession is concerned.