2 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2017
    1. Roewan Crowe, Associate Professor, Women’s and Gender Studies & Co-Director, Institute for Women’s & Gender Studies, University of Winnipeg. 2. Catherine Taylor, Professor, Faculty of Education and Dept of Rhetoric & Communications, University of Winnipeg. 3. Robin Jarvis Brownlie, Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Manitoba 4. Angela Failler, Chancellor’s Research Chair, Associate Professor, Women’s and Gender Studies, Research Affiliate Institute for Women’s and Gender Studies, University of Winnipeg. 5. Adele Perry, Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair, Department of History, University of Manitoba.

      Interesting to track this to the diffusion of ideas. Started in Manitoba.

  2. Feb 2014
    1. By contrast, any positive or negative effects that intellectual property rights have on the wider populace are diffused, and any individual member of the wider populace has little motive (and potentially insufficient means) to overco me the significant barriers to active political lobbying. As a result, the intrinsic trend is for intellectual INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY: POLICY FOR INNOVATION 11   property holders to actively lobby, largely unopposed, for greater rights protections. (Fisher, 1999, Sect. II. C.)

      Both positive and negative effects stemming from intellectual property rights to the wider populace are diffused, thus the wider populace has little motive to oppose changes to laws and policies that support intellectual property.