7 Matching Annotations
  1. Dec 2019
    1. broaden the definition of a ‘researcher’ to include a molecular biologist and basic science researcher, and to widen the scope of research ethics

      In order to adapt to new contexts, policy diffusion often triggers such semantic drift of key concepts.

      Would be great to see that linked to the policy learning framework.

    2. CIOMS Guidelines serve as a helpful reference in the drafting of a new regulation

      Good example of policy diffusion

    3. based on the recommendations and standards set out by international organisations like the World Medical Association and CIOMS

      Reference to policy diffusion

    4. Regarding recommended practices in international ethical policy documents, these are not sufficiently disseminated or internalized, hence gaps still exist in relation to best practices and critical aspects of data practices. To address this challenge, it is not only essential to disseminate and promote these policies, but to also adapt them to the contexts and situations where they are applicable through training and capacity building.

      Given that the article is framed as being about policy diffusion and using a policy learning framework, I would have expected more details here.

  2. Jul 2019
    1. The web, in yet another example of its leveling effect, allows nearly everyone to see nearly every interface. Thus designers can learn rapidly from what others have done, and users can see if one web site's experience is substandard compared to others.
  3. Jun 2017
    1. Roewan Crowe, Associate Professor, Women’s and Gender Studies & Co-Director, Institute for Women’s & Gender Studies, University of Winnipeg. 2. Catherine Taylor, Professor, Faculty of Education and Dept of Rhetoric & Communications, University of Winnipeg. 3. Robin Jarvis Brownlie, Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Manitoba 4. Angela Failler, Chancellor’s Research Chair, Associate Professor, Women’s and Gender Studies, Research Affiliate Institute for Women’s and Gender Studies, University of Winnipeg. 5. Adele Perry, Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair, Department of History, University of Manitoba.

      Interesting to track this to the diffusion of ideas. Started in Manitoba.

  4. Feb 2014
    1. By contrast, any positive or negative effects that intellectual property rights have on the wider populace are diffused, and any individual member of the wider populace has little motive (and potentially insufficient means) to overco me the significant barriers to active political lobbying. As a result, the intrinsic trend is for intellectual INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY: POLICY FOR INNOVATION 11   property holders to actively lobby, largely unopposed, for greater rights protections. (Fisher, 1999, Sect. II. C.)

      Both positive and negative effects stemming from intellectual property rights to the wider populace are diffused, thus the wider populace has little motive to oppose changes to laws and policies that support intellectual property.