5 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2022
    1. This strategy has been shown to substantially increase student achievement across all grade levels (elementary through college) and with students who present with various disabilities (Haydon, Mancil, Kroeger, McLeskey, & Lin, 2011).

      Guided notes (or skeletal notes with broad topic headings) are a useful pedagogical scaffolding technique to encourage students to take notes. Methods like this have been show to improve student outcomes at all levels as well as for those with disabilities.

  2. Jan 2022
    1. les lettres que je reçois des Services adaptés en rendent plusieurs visibles

      Most of us have received those letters, indicating that some learners will require special accommodations. And students learn to fit the description. Reminds me of those learners in my classes who expressed surprise at obtaining a high grade on an assignment.

      For instance, a musician in my ethnomusicology course, back in 2006, came to me with something of a complaint:

      You gave me an A on this assignment!

      Right. What's the problem?

      I have a learning disability!

      Erm... Not in my course, you don't! ;-)

      Students like this musician had done exactly the work required to fulfill the requirements... which didn't match expected requirements (which are overwhelmingly scriptocentric).

      Conversely, some learners assume they'll always get good grades ("I'm an A student!"), typically because their writing style matches academic expectations.

      Surely, there's research on this labelling effect. Now, I'm not saying that it's the only effect coming from these letters (or from "dean's lists"). Accommodations can be particularly important in courses where there's a pressure to perform in a certain way. And it sounds like grade-based rewards are important in several social systems. I'm merely thinking of links between Howie Becker's best-known book and his unsung work.

  3. Aug 2021
  4. Nov 2019
    1. In this article we learn about the transition for the disabled student to life beyond high school. Initially, students with disabilities in school are assigned and Individualized Education Program (IEP) to evaluate skills and determine services needed for the success, progression, and learning of the student. Once students are 16 and older or leave school how do they deal with work, home, or even continuing education? The article provides details on implementing simulations in the "acquisition of functional skills, and how "when paired" with technology or digital simulations the student can practice more and maintain skills better. The article offers a great charts for trying technology based software, multimedia, training activities, with students with disabilities and outcomes. 10/10

  5. Nov 2018