36 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2018
    1. the most intimate part of their bodies is often used as a catchword for weakness.

      Could the use of modalities erase this stigma? The women's march and the pussyhat have tried and failed, but are there some other combinations of modalities that could make a larger impact?

    2. Access Hollywood recording

      Why was only one modality needed to convey trumps message? Yet the message of the pussy hat included visual,aural, gestural, and spatial modality and was still misunderstood?

    3. Access Hollywood recording

      This recording is considered aural modality. Normally when a modality is used you must weigh the affordances, to decide which type best gets your point across, or if a combination is needed. In this case only one type of modality was needed to convey his message.

    4. But the color has nothing to do with race, according to Suh, who is Asian American. She said the group chose pink because it is associated with femininity.

      This is an example of an affordance of using visual modality. Because only one form of modality was used the interpretation went astray. If for example linguistic modality of what the author actually meant was incorporated into the discussion of the hat, people wouldn't misinterpret its meaning.

    5. The cat-eared “pussyhat”

      The use of cat ears is a form of visual modality, and labeling the hat a "pussyhat" is considered linguistic modality. The use of both these modes is considered multi modality. This multi modality is used to represent a specific idea. Since this idea is misinterpreted, it begs the question of what type of modality could have been added to convey a clearer message. Perhaps aural modality from the creator explaining her vision.

  2. Feb 2018
    1. marginalized

      A term used to describe a person, group, or concept as insignificant or peripheral. This term is important because it explains why the "pussyhat" was created in the first place. And also explains why there were so many marginalized people that had an issue with the hat. If this linguistic modality was used in conjunction with the visual modality of the hat, it's meaning wouldn't have seemed so myopic to those complaining in this article.

    2. cisgender (a person who identifies with their birth sex)

      This is an example of Linguistic modality in the form of spatial modality. This word is used to help the readers get through the text without difficulty by organizing people into categories.

    3.  People gather for the Women's March in Washington U.S., January 21, 2017. Shannon Stapleton / Reuters

      This photo is very multimodal. The signs are a form of linguistic modality used to portray the ideas of the people in the march. The visual aspect of a sea of pink hats and women shows us who the march is about. The gestural aspect of body language depicts a multitude of emotions. Emotions that are later expressed in this article.

    4. Pink 'Pussyhat' Creator Addresses Criticism Over Name

      My chosen supplemental reading is "Pink"pussyhat" creator addresses criticism over name." This reading mainly focuses on the how the visual modality of the hat evoked many different responses, and emotions based off the person viewing it. This article also mentions what the author really wanted the hat to symbolize.

    5. “The hat won’t prove anything. The actions of the people will."

      This is an example of what Ball means by affordances. The hat is an example of the visual and the interactions between people is considered spatial. The affordances of the visual modality i.e the hat limit the understanding of the message. The author is saying, the use of spatial modality is enough to convey the true message.

    6. She believes that in order for movements to be truly intersectional they must center around the most marginalized.

      She only believes this movement isn't inter-sectional because that was her interpretation of the visual modality of the color pink and the linguistic modality of the name "pussy hat." The use of different modalities would probably change her entire interpretation.

    7. the hat’s symbolism is disrespectful of grassroots movements that have tried to create a progressive conversation around the “anatomy of all people.”

      I believe she is stating that to her the hat is used as a form of spatial modality, representing the separation of all genders.

    8. “The fact that this hat is on the cover of [Time Magazine and The New Yorker] at a time where immigrants and refugees are being held captive essentially and being forced to reconcile that they may never be able to return to the place they call home, just shows how out of alignment America is with the things that really matter,”

      Don't both issues matter? The visual representation of the hat represents the slow moving struggle for women's equality. It's not just about the hat it's how the different modalities used represent various issues.

    9. “My belief is that pink is considered a little bit frivolous, girly, weak, soft, effeminate, and honestly, I don’t think it’s the color, I think it’s a code for women,” Suh said.

      Here the author explains how the visual modality of the color pink evokes a linguistic and in a way spatial modality, in that this language shows a separation between the genders.

    1. Print your own destruction

      When Haltman states that ones relationship to an object becomes more complex could he be referring to the polarity he mentioned earlier in the text? This complex relationship to 3D printing possibly leading to our own destruction and the polarity of using this for good and evil is exactly what Haltman is refering to when he says “the most persistent object metaphors expressive of belief” seem embedded in polarities.

    2. Print your own destruction

      I wonder if this applies to Haltmans conception of self conciousness? When he states that "The more self-conscious one becomes,the more complex one’s relationship to an object becomes,physically and ocularly as well as psychologically and experientially." Are makers consciously printing there own destruction?

    3. bowling alone (as political scientist Robert D. Putnam characterized our turn-of-the-century decline of social involvement) to making together. For libertarians, the maker movement fits into the common narrative of the “self-made man” who wields market power; only now self-making takes on a more literal meaning.

      This is an example of the nuanced language Haltman refers to. Descriptive language such as "bowling alone, "self-made man." According to Haltman this "Description provides the bridge between the realm of the material and that of concepts and ideas."

    4. Opinion

      This article being an opinion post reflects Haltman's idea of turning to matters more subjective. Haltman suggest asking yourself "How does the object make you feel?"

    5. For many people, and more vocally the sages — those who write books and give TED talks, for instance — the movement is also about making freedom.

      This is a perfect example of Haltman's idea of "studying an object to formalize our observations in language." These books and TED talks are a result of Haltman's idea of material culture leading to descriptions and nuanced language. Leading to a better understanding of the object and language as a whole.

    6. myopic individualism

      Refers to the nearsighted Individualistic approach to the maker movement. It is important because this approach has been infringing on the economic virility of the maker movement as a whole.

    7. simplistic economic individualism

      Simplistic economic individualism refers to those 3D printing as being disunited. It's important because this disunity could be the downfall of the "maker movement." If united, makers can disrupt the existing economy.

    8. There’s no financial security and no time for rest when everybody is constantly working the maker hustle — all part of the extreme capitalistic tenet of turning every part of life into an economic activity.

      This is similar to the "material culture" that Haltman is referring to. Haltman states "Material culture begins with a world of objects but takes place in a world of words." this extreme capitalistic tent is what makes material culture possible. Which therefore makes it possible to "work“with”material objects,i.e.refer"to"them,the medium in which we work as cultural historians is language." Leading to the study of said objects.

    9. Today a small contingent experiences new opportunities to express itself creatively.

      The main text agrees with the supplemental text, by stating that visual analysis and verbal expression go hand in hand. Since the supplemental text is concerning 3D printing of objects and the main text regards using objects to expand language both texts are a fusion of visual analysis and verbal expression.

    10. Makers and takers

      Both my primary and supplemental text mention polarity. "The persistent object metaphors expressive of belief seem embedded in polarities"The Haltman text mentions them in object metaphors in the same way my supplemental text uses the expression of makers and takers as a metaphor for what is to come with the use of 3D printing.

    11. 3-D print your way to freedom and prosperity

      The supplemental text I am applying is "3D print your way to freedom". This text unlike the "Hallman" text is an online news article discussing the affects of 3D printing on both society and the economy. Whereas Hallman's is an anthology of essays, used to help build a better understanding of things.

  3. Jan 2018
    1. The crayon, or perhaps more accurately “crayon-like object”, is 22-milimetres long and seven-millimetres wide, an elongated structure comprised primarily of haematitite, although with some small hard pieces of other minerals embedded.

      Haltman says "material objects begin in a world of objects but takes place in a world of words." Finding this crayon is congruent to this belief because this object opens a door to a new "world of words." Although primitive in language this crayon would begin a new "nuanced vocabulary" for early man.

    1. Materialculturebeginswithaworldofobjectsbuttakesplaceinaworldofwords.Whilewework“with”materialobjects,i.e.refer"to"them,themediuminwhichweworkasculturalhistoriansislanguage.

      Material culture is our worlds abundant interaction with objects. This is significant to the text because material culture is everywhere, and we use these objects to observe and formulate words associated with the objects in the material world. Building a better understanding of the language we use. ![]https://images.pexels.com/photos/374894/pexels-photo-374894.jpeg?w=1260&h=750&auto=compress&cs=tinysrgb()

    2. Aresearchprospectus

      a formal proposal of a research project developed to convince a reader. It's significant because it gives you a clear insight into what about your object you should be interpreting. Which is a very important feature of this document.

    3. Themoreself-consciousonebecomes,themorecomplexone’srelationshiptoanobjectbecomes

      Does having a more complex relationship to and object improve ones language?

    4. Themoreself-consciousonebecomes,themorecomplexone’srelationshiptoanobjectbecomes

      How does one become more self-conscious?

    5. Composingandrevisinganobjective-as-possibledescriptionfreesonetomovefromanarrowfocusontheobjectitselftoafocusontherelationshipbetweentheobjectandoneselfasitsperceiver.

      The supplemental text states that people who believe in the maker movement have embraced a "naively apolitical, techno-economic, capitalist utopia" by believing that 3D printing won't be used by corporations. According to the main text these people must "move from a narrow focus on the object itself to focus on the relationship between the object and oneself." Both readings believe that this "narrow focus" must be changed.

    6. “fusionofvisualanalysisandverbalexpression.”

      The main text agrees with the supplemental text, by stating that visual analysis and verbal expression go hand in hand. Since the supplemental text is concerning 3D printing of objects and the main text regards using objects to expand language both texts are a fusion of visual analysis and verbal expression.

    7. nominative,forthemostpart)

      What is nominative language?

    8. Technicallyaccuratelanguage(nominative,forthemostpart

      What is considered technically accurate language?

    9. Theyconstituteasortofpedagogicsampler,ananthologyofessaysinthestrictlyetymologicalsense:experimentsinorelaborationsofarigorouslypractical(asopposedtopurelytheoretical)approachtounderstandingthings.

      The supplemental text I am applying is "3D print your way to freedom". This text unlike the "Hallman" text is an online news article discussing the affects of 3D printing on both society and the economy. Whereas Hallman's is an anthology of essays, used to help build a better understanding of things.

    10. Prowngoesontosuggestthat“themostpersistentobjectmetaphorsexpressiveofbelief”seemembeddedinpolarities

      Both my primary and supplemental text mention polarity. The Hallman text mentions them in object metaphors in the same way my supplemental text uses the expression of makers and takers as a metaphor for what is to come with the use of 3D printing.