44 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2021
    1. Anne: Were you living in that rural area before you left?Juan: No, before I left, I was living here in Mexico City, but not in the center. I was living in the outside of the center, where they were barely making houses. In a way it is, as well, rural parts because the conditions that we lived in weren't the best. We did have a roof over our heads and we did have food, but things could have been better when I was younger.

      Mexico before the US, Mexican childhood, Memories

    1. Anne: Yeah.Ben: Them shelters can't possibly hold all them people, they can't. And so, all these people running around—they're running around the monument right now—laying there around. I see them laying around, the same people laying on the streets. But here in Mexico City, it's not that bad. You go to the border and the border cities where all along the Texas border, those are main dumping grounds for ICE [Immigration and Customs Enforcement]. All these border detentions that are on the border states, they're daily buses are driving and dumping people off. Detentions from up north, they wait until they fill up a plane, or planes, then they ship them. But here, they catch. It's every day they're dumping people. And there’s gotta be something done about that. I think that there's assistance for just about any and everything else. I do think that it would be in the best interest of the government to assist deportees that are coming back. It would probably save them a lot of money—it'd probably save them more to get them home and give them a little bit of cash, give them a bus ticket home to where they're from, and it would be a lot less expensive than all the chaos that's going on right now.Anne: Seems that the US also has really ignored the whole problem, the families that they're breaking up.Ben: Yeah.Anne: You've thought about that, in terms of US policy, ways that they can eliminate the hardship that your family is going through because you're here?Ben: Yeah.Anne: I mean not just the financial, emotional but everything. And it seems like it’s not even in the equation.Ben: Yes, that's true, that's not even in the equation. [Pause]. That's tough. But yes, I think [Pause] that [Pause] they're not looking at individual cases when looking at this immigration issue. I mean if they really, if the immigration person were really doing their job, then the judge did his job and really take the time to look at each individual case, some of these separations wouldn't happen. But they're not doing that, to me they're just trying to pile up numbers. I know many a case where…Just an example, one gentleman, taking care of his family, has residency, he's a legal resident. One DWI and it's over with, he's gone.Anne: He's a legal resident?Ben: A legal resident. One DWI and that's it, he's gone. And I've known of others that had up to three and they're still there. I know some that have felonies and they're still there. Then one DWI, that's not being fair. The biggest injustice I think is going after all these Dreamers and using the information that they filled out on their DACA paperwork to go track them down. I agree that there has to be some type of people should be picked up, but they're not chasing those people. They're going for the easy numbers because, you know what? Those guys they don't have paperwork where they can go pick them up, they’re not going to school here, going there. It's harder to catch them, so you know what? We can drum up 10-15,000 people right here, beef our numbers up. We got the addresses, let's just go get them.Ben: And that's kind of what they're doing, not really doing their job. Just to say that “We're doing something.” With 9/11, I remember that they, within the first few days, 20 something hundred arrests that they were attributing as terrorist arrests. But you know who they were picking up? They were picking up Mexicans most of them. It was not 20 something hundred Middle Easterners. But regardless, they were numbers. They had to show that they were doing something. But that's that [Chuckles].Ben: The US, there's a lot that they could be doing, because they can deport 100,000, but they know they gotta replace those 100,000 for the workforce. One thing I know is I know the ins and outs of labor in the US. That is one thing that I do know. And I do know that there's unwritten policies that look the other way, look the other way while we get this done. We need this done, look the other way. Hurricane Katrina was one, we had immigration, immigration was about the only police patrolling the area at the time and they weren't bothering anybody—it was hands off until they get this cleaned up. And once all the toxic clean-up was out of the way, then they started to enforce, but still not full force again.Ben: So, there's a lot to the government, part to blame there. Instead of locking them up, they should really create some type of labor program.Anne: People can come and go.Ben: People can come, instead of coming across and, to me, instead of somebody going to work over there and pay $6,000 to a coyote, they could pay $1,500 at a processing center to apply and get placed in a job by the US government legally. But you know what? US government don't wanna do that, because they want to keep them costs down. And so, does private business, they need to keep them costs down. It's like, would you like to pay $30 for a Big Mac? [Laughs].Anne: You’re saying that McDonald's is just using a lot of undocumented and paying them really?Ben: Well the whole concept of migrant labor, the migrant labor force, is to keep the cost of products down and housing as well. If it wasn't for migrant labor and this underground labor networks that are operating, a $250,000 house would've probably cost you a million. And a lot of people wouldn't be able to, a lot of people can't afford a $200,000 house [Chuckles].Anne: No. Well I thank you very much.Ben: Thank you all for coming, coming to help us out and spread the news.Anne: You’ve probably been asked this question, but do you consider yourself an American? A Mexican?Ben: You know, honestly deep inside, American. That's how I've always felt. But right now, after this happened, it's like have you ever, there was a book called The Man with No Country, are you familiar with that?Anne: Yeah.Ben: That's, when I was deported, that's the first thing that, that's what came to my mind, The Man with No Country, not here, not there, not accepted here, not accepted over there. And when I got here it's like, no paperwork, no drivers, no identification, and I had a harder time getting a driver's license, getting my voter registration—which is the main source of ID here—the toughest time here then I did getting ID in the United States. And I was illegal in the United States and I was able to, anything I needed, I could get over there. And here, I'm here, I had a hard time. It took me a few months.Anne: It's really too bad.Ben: Yeah. Kind of rough. I don't know if it had been easier here, in the big city, but over there it was pretty rough, hard getting around.Anne: Well, I wish you the best of luck.Ben: Oh, thank you—Anne: I think that you're, you think you're going to be fine, so I think you're going to be fine. And you must be very proud of your family, they seem really great.Ben: Oh, I am, they're going, they're moving forward, that was the purpose of heading that way.

      Reflections

  2. Jun 2021
    1. Anita: How old are you Ivan?Ivan: How old? I'm twenty-seven years old.Anita: You were born in Mexico?Ivan: Yes. I was born in Mexico.Anita: Where in Mexico?Ivan: In the city of Mexico.

      Mexico, before the US, Mexican childhood

    1. In Mexico, it's really hard to get an opportunity. A lot of people are where they are because they know someone [Laughs] or because they've paid to be there and it's really hard trying to be what they would say, the working class. Trying to work your way to a point where you know you're successful and you can say, "I've done a lot of things." But if you're not the cousin of the owner, or if you're not a family member related to somebody in power, it's like you don't have a chance.
    1. I told my dad, "Dad, remember the last time you told me that it was this," he started laughing like in my face, like, "Oh, what are you talking about?"

      Returning to Mexico - being reliant on his father - being alone- untrusting of father

    2. So, yeah. Hopefully I'll find something. They actually told me they had some openings here, but if that doesn't work out, I know I could always go back to Teletech. Hopefully something's got to give.

      Return to Mexico - looking for employment

    1. My dad's family is on the wealthier side and a little bit on the powerful side, and my mom has no money nor connections, and she's poor. When they were divorcing, by the end of their marriage—I think it was the most awful marriage that I've seen—he was threatening her with taking us away and completely … you know she would never see us ever, so like a thief in the night, she grabbed my two sisters and I and she moved us to the States.

      Before the US, in Mexico - Childhood, memories - migration to the US - Domestic violence

  3. May 2021
  4. Apr 2021
    1. La desinhibición a los actos violentos y su diafanada presencia a lo largo de la historia del ser humano, se han visto incitadas y provocadas durante nuestra época por el sistema social con el cual hemos sido instruidos. Cabe denotar que la autora hace énfasis en la violencia de género, parafraseando conceptualizaciones de la ideología feminista nos explica: la postura social de la masculinidad y la feminidad, sus interrelaciones afectadas por la corrosión del comportamiento sustentándolo con una explicación psicoanalítica y la afectación que las organizaciones y el ser humano efectúan sobre el ser humano.. Al final de texto Rita hace un comunicado dirigido a los hombres, induce la idea de ser participes en la solución del problema social puesto que no somos ajenos a él. De esta forma este texto es dirigido para toda persona que deseé informarse sobre uno de los problemas sociales más importantes de nuestra historia, pues Desde el 2009 las muertes violentas de mujeres —y de hombres— se dispararon de manera significativa; sólo en 2010 y 2011 los homicidios femeninos casi se duplicaron. Esta tendencia sólo se revirtió en 2014 y 2015, en el 2016 y hasta el momento la cifra continúa con alzas. Los registros también evidencian una creciente tendencia de las muertes violentas de mujeres. Aún con el confinamiento estricto que paralizó gran parte de las actividades y la movilidad el total de asesinatos de mujeres creció 0.6% en comparación con el mismo periodo del 2019. Como último quiero remarcar lo que dijo la autora "Los hombres deben entrar en las luchas contra el patriarcado, pero que no deben hacerlo por nosotras y para protegernos del sufrimiento que la violencia de género nos inflige, sino por ellos mismos, para liberarse del mandato de la masculinidad."

  5. Mar 2021
    1. Coronavirus Pandemic Data Explorer. (n.d.). Our World in Data. Retrieved March 3, 2021, from https://ourworldindata.org/coronavirus-data-explorer

      is:webpage lang:en COVID-19 graph case death Germany Sweden UK Afghanistan Africa Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antigua Barbuda Argentina Armenia Asia Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Colombia Comoros Congo Costa Rica Cote d'ivoire Croatia Cuba Cyprus Czechia Democratic Republic of Congo Denmark Djobouti Dominica Dominician Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Eswatini Ethiopia Europe Europian Union Faeroe Islands Falkland Islands Fiji Finland France Gabon Gambia Georgia Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Isle of Man israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Mashall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nepal Netherlands New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria North America North Macedonia Northern Cyprus Norway Oceania Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philipines Poland Portugal Qatar Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Helena Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Vincent Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South America South Korea South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Timor Togo Trinidad Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates USA Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican Venezuela Vietnam World Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe test vaccine chart map table data case fatality rate mortality

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  6. Feb 2021
    1. https://desinformemonos.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/el-traspatio-4.jpg

      Entre 2008 y 2013, en el terreno llamado Arroyo El Navajo, ubicado a 94 kilómetros de la frontera con Estados Unidos, se encontraron los fragmentos de huesos de al menos 24 mujeres que fueron secuestradas en Ciudad Juárez durante el periodo en el que la zona estuvo militarizada por el despliegue de agentes federales y soldados, como parte del “Operativo Conjunto Chihuahua

    1. Hodcroft, E. B., Domman, D. B., Oguntuyo, K., Snyder, D. J., Diest, M. V., Densmore, K. H., Schwalm, K. C., Femling, J., Carroll, J. L., Scott, R. S., Whyte, M. M., Edwards, M. D., Hull, N. C., Kevil, C. G., Vanchiere, J. A., Lee, B., Dinwiddie, D. L., Cooper, V. S., & Kamil, J. P. (2021). Emergence in late 2020 of multiple lineages of SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein variants affecting amino acid position 677. MedRxiv, 2021.02.12.21251658. https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.02.12.21251658

  7. Jan 2021
  8. Oct 2020
  9. Aug 2020
  10. Jul 2020
  11. May 2020
  12. Apr 2020
  13. Feb 2020
  14. Nov 2019
    1. Private post-secondary institutions that provide educational services in the State of New Mexico are subject to either the New Mexico Post-Secondary Educational Institution Act (Section 21-23-1 et seq. NMSA 1978) or the Interstate Distance Education Act (Section 21-23B-1 et seq. NMSA 1978) and can use this site to apply for State Authorization or submit other required applications to comply with State regulations. Students may request transcripts of closed schools where the New Mexico Higher Education Department is the designated custodian of records or may file complaints against any post-secondary institution that provides educational services in our State.

      The NMHE website is about providing academic, financial and policies to new mexico public higher education institutions and community.

  15. Mar 2019
  16. Dec 2018
    1. La Corte IDH ordena al Estado realizar una investigación exhaustiva de los hechos, que incluya a todas las formas de responsabilidad a nivel federal y estatal, sentando un precedente importante al explicitar que el Estado mexicano tiene el deber de esclarecer la participación de la cadena de mando. En relación con los actos cometidos contra las mujeres de Atenco, reconoce que la violencia del operativo utilizó la violencia sexual como práctica represiva. En este sentido,la  Corte ordena al Estado, entre otras cosas, implementar medidas de atención a las mujeres y también para revertir las condiciones que permiten hasta hoy la comisión de tortura sexual y represión policiaca. Como ha sido reconocido por la Suprema Corte de Justicia de la Nación, las sentencias de la Corte IDH son de carácter vinculante para México, por lo que el Estado está obligado

      Aquí sí no hay amnistía que valga... Atenco a la Corte Internacional de Derechos Humanos, caiga quien caiga y tope donde tenga que topar.

    1. Al aproximarse al rancho de Guzmán por primera vez, Flores dijo estar muy nervioso y ponerse aún más tenso al ver en el camino el cadáver de un hombre desnudo atado con cadenas a un árbol.

      Y al aproximarse, vio que en un árbol...

      Esto es un boquete de la realidad. O quizás un lugar de hiperrealidad. Esto ya no debe ser.

    1. Penchyna Grub asumió la Dirección General del Infonavit el 29 de febrero de 2016 y entregó el cargo el pasado 30 de noviembre. Penchyna, quien fue uno de los priistas encargados de sacar la Reforma Energética del Presidente Peña Nieto en 2013

      Reseña: priísta, Infonavit, aviones de lujo.

    1. “El Juez debe tomar en cuenta que Guillermo Padrés se presentó voluntariamente ante la autoridad, a fin responder sobre las acusaciones que se habían presentado en su contra, elemento que consideramos que debe ser considerado por el poder Judicial. Lleva dos años en prisión y siguen sin acreditarse los señalamientos en su contra”, expuso el vocero del PAN.

      Les ha pegado la Cuarta Transformación. Se vieron las barbas remojar sin siquiera haber visto las del vecino cortar.

  17. Nov 2018
    1. The plan, called “Remain in Mexico,” amounts to a major break with current screening procedures, which generally allow those who establish a fear of return to their home countries to avoid immediate deportation and remain in the United States until they can get a hearing with an immigration judge.

      What a creative name!

  18. Sep 2018
    1. Considero que este fragmento es importante ya que demuestra la visión de algunas de las empresas mexicanas, que es no abrirse a personas ajenas a la familia. Es una idea compartida en nuestro contexto y por lo que he checado en otros artículos también de los demás países de américa latina, es un dato interesante.

  19. Mar 2018
  20. Feb 2018
    1. I believe in the sweetness of Jesus And Buddha - I believe, In St. Francis, Avaloki Tesvara,

      Religious eclecticism: multiple faiths. This is from the collection of poems Mexico City Blues. In an interview, when asked to whom he prayed, Kerouac replied: "I pray to my little brother, who died, and to my father, and to Buddha, and to Jesus Christ, and to the Virgin Mary" (Carlisle 205). This is the link to the book: https://books.google.ie/books/about/Moral_Powers_Fragile_Beliefs.html?id=C6j45qICcO4C&redir_esc=y.

      Famously, Kerouac remained, throughout his life, a Christian, and always considered himself one. It would be interesting to look into the contrast between Christianity and Buddhism as concerns suffering (one elevates it, while the other aims at its annihilation) and how Kerouac approached it too. I remember one article which talked about Kerouac as mainly "a sufferer", possibly from The Times: find it again.

  21. Nov 2016
    1. Ver punto 4.5.1. Abierto a comentarios. Si deseas comentar anónimamente o sin registrarte, haz el Log in como:

      Usuario: Anonimo<br> Contraseña: anonimo

    1. he later returned to Mexico and formed his own military force known as Division del Norte (Division of the North).

      made his own military force

  22. Apr 2016
    1. Mexico’s 2015 population survey, released Dec. 8, counted 1.38 million people of African heritage, representing 1.2% of the country’s population (link in Spanish.) Most live in three coastal states, including Guerrero, where they account for nearly 7% of the population, and overall they are poorer and less educated than the national average, Mexico’s census bureau (INEGI by its acronym in Spanish) has found.

      Mexico has started counting its Mexican population.

  23. Dec 2015
    1. Latin America's past of slavery and colonization is linked to anti-black racism, which some countries have tried to fight with anti-discrimination and affirmative action policies. Denying the existence of the black population by not counting them in the national census is one major way structural racism plays out in Latin American countries although anti-blackness is a pervasive issue in other issues, as well.

      Mexico Takes Big Steps In Finally Recognizing Afro-Latinos

  24. Oct 2015
    1. Taking on Corruption in Latin America

      This article discusses the difficulty in attacking corruption. It uses Guatemala and Brazil as examples of direct corruption through embezzlement and fraud schemes with Chile and Mexico where corruption is rooted in access to political knowledge and nepotism. In Chile and Mexico, the link is less direct and investigations cannot be traced as concretely as was the case in Brazil and Guatemala. This can make tackling corruption extremely difficult where these cases are more difficult to prove.

  25. Sep 2015
    1. Ancient tunnels discovered underneath Mexican city of Puebla

      Construction often uncovers archaeological features in cities. Commercial archaeologists are often called into construction sites in order to excavate the material.