88 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2019
    1. black Americans have been making rapid progress along most important dimensions of well-being since the turn of the millennium.

      testing annotatioins

  2. Apr 2019
    1. the manuscripts that were discovered nine years ago, now in the University of Arkansas library with many of her other papers, are mostly complete and easily performed.

      I do recall this happening way more than it should. Not only just A.A but many other colored people. Thousands of art just now being discovered. As a woman of afo-latina descent it makes me proud to know more and more blacks of all ethnicities are becoming prominent in art today.

  3. Jan 2019
    1. We regularly, in the interests of Plato-worship, disembody language and reason, with the narrow-mindedness Mark Johnson points out in an important recent book, The Body in the Mindl3 Our persistent evasion of the "Q" question makes for a great deal of self-centered, self-serving preaching and a great deal of self-satisfied practice. We do sometimes follow that master of contemptuous, self-satisfied self-absorp-tion, the Platonic Socrates, closely indeed.

      This reminds me of Albert Camus' thoughts on absurdity, and what James Cone says in his book Black Theology and Black Power: "All aspects of this society have participated in the act of enslaving blacks, extinguishing Indians, and annihilating all who question white society's right to decide who is human....Absurdity arises as the black man seeks to understand his place in the white world. The black man does not view himself as absurd; he views himself as human. But as he meets the white world and its values, he is confronted with an almighty No and is defined as a thing. This produces the absurdity."

    1. Africans in the Atlantic world, printed discourse was part of a larger "racial complex" that both supported imperial plantation systems and denied people of color equality in the civic realm. This racial complex was constituted in a variety of printed forms, from slave laws stored in dusty bookshelves to denigrating racial labels in popular plays, novels, and pieces of travel writing. By the latter half of the eighteenth century, however, a vanguard of black writers, readers, and letter writers came to view printed discourse as a potential means of surmounting racial oppres sion. According to the literary scholar John Ernest, letters, literacy, print, and the book all became part of a "liberation historiography"—a "specifically textual" response by black writers to racial hierarchies established not only in law and politics but in print.

      This section truly highlights the contradictory nature of the print medium as an information technology that was used by imperial whites to marginalize black voices and on the other hand was used to by black writers to tackle, overcome racial oppression and reclaim the black voice.

  4. Nov 2018
  5. Oct 2018
  6. Aug 2018
    1. You might have seen the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter in the previous step. In this 6-minute video, #BlackTwitter after #Ferguson, we meet activists who were involved in the movement and learn about their own uses of Twitter as a platform of protest. Hashtags, when used like this, can be extremely complex in the way they represent ideas, communities and individuals.
  7. Jul 2018
    1. The Blue Lives Matter movement, which began after the December 20, 2014, slaying of two New York City police officers, soon adopted the Thin Blue Line flag. The murders were the catalyst for what quickly became a rebuttal to Black Lives Matter, its insistence that we pay more attention to killer cops than to cops killed in the line of duty.
  8. May 2018
    1. China’s ‘social credit system’ monitors citizen behavior and punishes them with travel bans, bans from four and five star hotels, preventing them from sending children to expensive schools, and throttling internet speeds.

      This is so Black Mirror.

  9. Apr 2018
    1. Her words reveal the conflict between allegiance to hercultural background and her adopted culture.

      conflict between both of her cultures. her cultural background is one of patrice lumbaba who was killed. meaning her only identity were two european royaltyis and a horribly alteres portrayal, embodiment of Jesus

    2. FindingGod’s strength within was the emotional and spiritualfoundation and the necessary antecedent of “regaining mycomposure.”

      this is good and all but I dont think she found strength in God. it might've been the opposite. closer reading needed

      Sarah's relationship with God has been completely skewed. Her mother urged herfather to be "jesus" a savior to the black race. he was supposed to heal the misery of the black man, but instead he ended up wanting to escape his blackness.

      Her foundation of christ is just as broken as her foundation in her father. by her line "I always belived my father to be God" it means that she used to have faith in him. used to have faith in him as a black man like her mother did. but when he went off and married a white woman she lost her ability to have faith in anything.

      to her, her father marrying a white woman would be like jesus endorsing the anti-christ. it is absolutely blasphemous in chrisitan belief and would challenge the entire lifestyle and existance of a christians religious identity.

    3. n fact, some women preferred a Whitetherapist, feeling that would ensure that their private sufferingwould remain private in their closely-knit West Indiancommunity, and would provide an “outside” perspective

      This preferance for white women therapists in this exact respect can actually be harmdul. because a white woman is not truly what she needs to talk to. also sarah has been looking for solace in a white people, she doesn't need an outside perspective, what she needs is someone who actually understands her.

      this reaching for white people is what caused her confusion in the first place. Her desire for whiteness while being black- or rather her refusal to ackowledge the power/strength/beauty of her blackness is what kills her.

      At once she states that she bludgeoned her father with a black mask/head. this is a metaphor that she was so hurt that her father chose the white life that she'd rather have him die as a black beast than to see him live as black man married to a white woman. so she killed him in an ugly portrayal of blackness- to justify her desire to be affiliated with white people. She doesn't want to claim her father or ackowledge her hypocrisy.

      In fact, we can read her boyfriend as her therapist. he's white, jewish, and seems to find amusement in her lies, hatred, and body. this amusement of problems is because he's so far detached from the situation he can't provide any empathy and understanding to her actions and much less read into her obvious cries for help.

      read more into the need for black ppl to see black therapists*

  10. Mar 2018
    1. It is to explore thesocial processes that often depict Black women as liberated from tradi-tional white norms of femininity while such women continue to experi-ence poverty, violence, and illness at rates that exceed those of theirso-called fragile white sisters.

      Sarah clearly states how much she yearns to be like her white counterparts. that could be a peak of her wisdom on who has it easier in te first place.

      she already experiences the poverty, violence and (mental) illness that her blackness has had to offer her. and she doesn't want to be liberated from white feminity she wants to indulge in it. the same way that her father is indulging in the spoils of a white woman and a white lifestyle.

    1. Earning $27 million it is only $18 million away from passing  2012's The Avengers as the highest-grossing superhero film of all-time, domestically.

      It's totally going to pass the Avengers. I for one will go again if it looks like it is slow to pass...

  11. www.wired.com www.wired.com
    1. What should a superhero movie be? What can it be? With Black Panther, we finally have an answer worthy of our time.

      Totally agree!

  12. Feb 2018
    1. An episode in the third season of the TV show “Black Mirror” portrays a world in which people spend nearly all their time using their phones to rate virtually everyone else on a five-star scale.

      Black Mirror made me think about rating systems. Similar to the book The Circle and user surveys.

  13. Jan 2018
  14. Aug 2017
  15. Jul 2017
  16. May 2017
    1. If all things go well, we’re about to finally see what a black hole looks like, as the Event Horizon Telescope connects six telescopes sprawled across the world and makes them work in tandem to image the supermassive black hole at the center our very own Milky Way galaxy.

      Black holes

    1. Rap Brown

      Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin (born Hubert Gerold Brown, October 4, 1943), also known as H. Rap Brown, was the fifth chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in the 1960s, and during a short-lived (six months) alliance between SNCC and the Black Panther Party, he served as their minister of justice. He is perhaps most famous for his proclamations during that period that "violence is as American as cherry pie" and that "If America don't come around, we're gonna burn it down." He is also known for his autobiography Die Nigger Die!. He is currently serving a life sentence for murder following the 2000 shooting of two Fulton County Sheriff's deputies. One deputy, Ricky Kinchen, died in the shooting. (Taken from Wikipedia)

    1. Black America's PAC

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

  17. Apr 2017
  18. Mar 2017
  19. Feb 2017
    1. he did not scruple to chastise African Ameri-cans, particularly black men, for running after trivial pursuits, for lacking in educa-tional and professional ambition, and for avoiding the challenging task of speaking up for their people's rights.

      The Black Lives Matter movement has a similar dialogue embedded in it:

      But this call to "be better" puts the onus back on the oppressed on a whole other level:

    1. criminal history as proof that he was a bad actor

      As a student recently wrote in a brainstorm of questions, "Why are people judged by what they were?" https://www.instagram.com/p/86A-X7OmNX/?taken-by=paulrallison That's something else going from a "criminal history" to a trait: "bad actor." Maybe he was unlucky enough to not be able to escape the criminal justice system. Maybe he was a good person who had something terrible follow him.

    1. northeast Portland

      Here's a history of this the process of gentrification that Linda Christensen uses in here gentrification curriculum: BLEEDING ALBINA: A HISTORY OF COMMUNITY DISINVESTMENT, 1940–2000

    2. "Thank God for gentrification," one of the men yelled into a megaphone. "Someone had to clean up the neighborhood."

      The three men yelling this at Black Lives Matter demonstrators must not have learned their lessons in Linda Christensen's English class at Jefferson High School http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Resources/Journals/EJ/1052-nov2015/EJ1052Focus.pdf

  20. Jan 2017
    1. composition, even the most poetical, is nothing arts is observed, even during the most polished but a chain of propositions and reasonings

      Black boxes unpacked.

    2. It is evident that none of the rules of composi-1 l tion are fixed by reasonings a priori,

      They are, in other words, not black boxes.

    3. Standard of Taste

      This is the black box that Hume hopes to unpack.

    1. An anomaly is thus a mere difference in degree for which the norm will serve as metric.

      Normal is a powerful, potent, and potentially pernicious black box. And it is frequently a black box deployed against rhetoric.

    2. Norms, have long inhabited the architect’s toolset

      I want to highlight the useful understanding of norms as tools: this very quickly begins to unpack the black box that is normal. Lemos turns norms" into Morty's car battery*.

    1. SuchshiftingiswhatRamushatedthemost:"Forartsoughttoconsistofsubjectsthatareconstant,perpetual,andunchanging,andtheyshouldconsideronlythoseconceptswhichPlatosaysarearchetypalandeternal"(99)

      Ramus wants black boxes that cannot be unpacked (or excavated).

  21. Oct 2016
    1. n a study cited by the Swiss group last month, researchers found Twitter data alone a more reliable predictor of heart disease than all standard health and socioeconomic measures combined.

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    Annotators

  22. Sep 2016
    1. The 2010 census showed 1.2 million Latinos who identified as black, or 2.5 percent of the Hispanic population.

      thats crazy... i never realized this

    2. who say they feel the sting of racism much the same as other blacks.

      latinos feel like they get the same racism as black people

  23. Jul 2016
    1. That is what Barack and I think about every day as we try to guide and protect our girls through the challenges of this unusual life in the spotlight, how we urge them to ignore those who question their father’s citizenship or faith.

      Many writers and thinkers have speculated about how the first black family has dealt with the what historian Carol Anderson calls the inevitable "white rage" backlash to Obama's election. Having served her time, Michelle seems more willing to take the criticisms head-on. This is what many of us would call "shade".

    2. How we insist that the hateful language they hear from public figures on TV does not represent the true spirit of this country.

      This line does some work. On one level, it is red meat for colorblind white (and some non-white) liberals who require all black figures to be hopeful (I've discussed this more here: http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2015/08/between-the-world-and-me-book-club-not-trying-to-get-into-heaven/400271/).

      On another level, it is doing some inter-group communication or what Stuart Hall called encoding/decoding and what Mark Anthony Neal translates into "black code" when he talks about Hall's work through modern media cultures. Obama is signaling here that she has noted those who have directed racist, sexist, classist rhetoric at her family. She has taken note.

    1. The locals refer to Tepito as the Barrio Bravo, the fierce neighborhood, for its reputation of criminality involving counterfeit goods, robbery, and drug selling.
  24. Jun 2016
    1. Title: LGBT and Black Lives Matter – What About Gay Rights for People of Color?

      Keywords: black youth, lgbt people

      Summary: The Court's Obergefell v. Hodges decision wouldn't be handed down for nearly two months; on this day, the justices were hearing the case.<br>The plaintiffs were attempting to establish the right of same-sex couples to marry in Kentucky, Michigan, Tennessee and Ohio; the marriage-equality activists who surrounded me were hoping the justices would use the Fourteenth Amendment's Equal Protection Clause not to just affirm a right to marriage in all fifty states but also to create a federal precedent under which any number of other rights for LGBT people might be argued for in the future.<br>This was stage-managed political theater, and the Human Rights Campaign, the LGBT-rights advocacy group, was its director.<br>Gay Men's Chorus belted out the Civil Rights-era protest song "We Shall Overcome."<br>The caucasity of the crowd couldn't be ignored.<br>That unseemly co-optation festered in my mind as I drove forty miles up I-95 to a city on fire.<br>Gray had been allegedly illegally arrested—even State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby later stated so—before he was shackled, thrown in the back of a van without being strapped in, and given a "rough ride" that is believed to have severed his spine.<br>Baltimore had quickly emerged as the new ground zero for the burgeoning Black Lives Matter movement, but the threat of ongoing violence was getting all the news.<br>As day faded into night, the nation wondered if more fires and mayhem would come.<br>Then something unexpected happened, something amazing: Black youth took control and started dancing.<br>They defiantly asserted themselves.<br>No tear gas stung our eyes.<br>These young people stared down the threat of police brutality and defiantly asserted themselves: 'We, by voguing, claim this space as our own.'<br>

  25. Apr 2016
    1. Mexico’s 2015 population survey, released Dec. 8, counted 1.38 million people of African heritage, representing 1.2% of the country’s population (link in Spanish.) Most live in three coastal states, including Guerrero, where they account for nearly 7% of the population, and overall they are poorer and less educated than the national average, Mexico’s census bureau (INEGI by its acronym in Spanish) has found.

      Mexico has started counting its Mexican population.

    1. “Language in the Inner City,”

      Labov’s key text on the sociolinguistics of African American Vernacular English, with special attention to verbal eloquence (such as ritual insults, similar to Hip Hop taunts) regardless of literacy levels.

  26. Dec 2015
    1. The most recent Population and Housing Census conducted in Cuba confirmed that black and mixed-race people are the poorest in Cuba, a problem that will be difficult to overcome by any post-Castro government. A future Cuba will also have to devote considerable efforts to come in aid of an aged population, the chronically ill, alcoholics, drug-addicts and the numerous single-mother families where fathers have been absent for three generations.

      Orlando Zapata's National Civic Resistance and Disobedience Front protesting racism and "Potential Criminality law"

    1. There's little question that, whatever else the Cuban Revolution has done or not done, it triumphed with a strong and progressive platform on race. At every single official level, it explicitly and forcibly banned racial discrimination. In fact, it may have done so too forcefully. Because Cuba is a top-down society -- especially under Fidel Castro -- the new anti-racism codes rained down without explanation and, more importantly, without process. People understood that racism was no longer tolerated but not how they participated in racist structures, how they were affected by the legacy of racism and, least of all, how light-skinned Cubans -- especially on the island -- benefited from those legacies.

      Article on the existence of modern racism in Cuba

    1. Latin America's past of slavery and colonization is linked to anti-black racism, which some countries have tried to fight with anti-discrimination and affirmative action policies. Denying the existence of the black population by not counting them in the national census is one major way structural racism plays out in Latin American countries although anti-blackness is a pervasive issue in other issues, as well.

      Mexico Takes Big Steps In Finally Recognizing Afro-Latinos

  27. Nov 2015
    1. "It makes me feel like a failure," he said of that photo. "I'm sitting here wishing I had done more. I wish I had made one more phone call. I wish we would have been able to give him a few more hours."

      I'm deeply saddened by this response. I've felt it so often. But what would Jamar have been able to do with those few more hours? What could have stopped this tragedy from speeding down to its inevitable end.

    2. he didn't have the structure to be the person he wanted to be

      What does that mean?!? Is it something in him? In our schools? In his experiences in his adoptive family? In not having a steady job? In getting pushed in and out of jail? What?

    3. Clark's sly grin in a selfie, wearing his Copeland Trucking hat.

      Jamar Clark

    4. terroristic threats

      Come again?

    5. "He cared about his family being connected with each other. He cared about having somebody care about him."

      I guess this is a basic human need: connection. But I'm struck with how sensitive Jamar was about this need. This sentence makes me want to write a song or a poem about Jamar, the lovely repetition of "cared" and "care."

    6. When things were going well, he was a nurturing, loving man who was drawn to her four children,

      This sentence and others in this article point to Jamar's connections to family: biological and adoptive parents, 14 siblings, wanting a family of his own, and a nurturing, loving man. And the police call him a "bad actor." Which is it? I guess he could be both. What does this phrase "When things were going well..." mean? Does it mean when Tim was providing employment and a motel room?

    7. The system failed miserably

      That seems pretty clear by now, a tragic series of events with Jamar going "in and out" of prison for three of his most precious years, his early 20's. But what can we imagine instead? How might "the system" respond to "troubled youth"? Who can we help now to avoid Jamar's path?

    8. Hoag was sure

      What gave Tim Hoag this optimism? What was he missing? Or is it just luck who can move past "it" and who can't.

    9. Clark spent much of his 20's in and out of prison

      Once back on the streets there were times when I couldn't afford to take the bus I didn't know where I was going to sleep at night Thank God for Tim who would get me a motel room, and a job when he could.

      I've made mistakes in my life, and I've paid my dues.

      When the cops stopped us after a high speed chase in July, did they have to beat me too?

    10. Tim Hoag and his wife hired Clark earlier this year

      I want to know more about Tim Hoag and his wife and their rental properties. And how Jamar came into their orbit. How could government have supported Tim Hoag and his wife in their reaching out to Jamar?

      Here's the beginning of a lead to learn more about Tim Hoag. He's the President of Copland Trucking. http://www.copelandtruc-king.com/team.htm Image Description

    11. petty misdemeanor for possessing a small amount of marijuana in 2009.

      Piecing this together, it seems that many of Jamar's troubles started with this "petty misdemeanor" for marijuana possession when he was 18. How can we see this story as being about a young Black man who was ensnared in a system of prison and crime that would only make things worse for him.

    12. At times he couldn't afford bus fare for work and struggled with stable housing. Hoag put him up at a motel for a few days to help out, and gave him as many hours of work at Copeland Trucking as he could, helping in the warehouse or on moves.

      I'm writing this from a workshop that Renee Watson and Linda Christensen are doing at NCTE about housing and racism in Portland. Reading this sentence, I can't help wonder how housing and incarceration and racism and joblessness are at the heart of Jamar's anger and difficulties in his relationship with his girlfriend. And given his struggles for stable housing, doesn't that help us understand what is going on with Jamar as he faces the police after having another fight with his girlfriend. The last sentence in this article must be given attention. How could we have done one more thing to help him?

    13. protesters outside the police precinct insist Clark was handcuffed before he was shot, which police dispute.

      Okay, so which of these is more credible. Isn't it irresponsible journalism to just report such an important detail as he said/she said? Which of the people who the reporter interviewed seemed most credible? Who was actually there?

    14. a July arrest for fleeing police in a high-speed chase.

      Sarah Gartnor, a friend of Chris Rodgers -- who took us over to the 4th Precinct yesterday (Thursday) -- told us that when she was sitting in the Mayor's living room the night before as part of a protest, a special prosecutor told her and her fellow protesters that Jamar had been beaten at the end of this high-speed chase. He was about to testify about that beating in January, he told her.

    15. on probation

      He's had a hard time, but this sounds ugly.

    16. three years in and out of prison

      What does this mean? Was he is prison or not?

    17. they contend he was reaching for an officer's gun when he was shot.

      Okay, he was either reaching for a gun or he was handcuffed. How does a reporter merely report this without pointing out that this is clearly NOT what many witnesses said happened. And I would assume that she did follow-up interviews with quoting these eye-witnesses. what did these "union reps" have to say about why their story is so different?

    18. police union representatives

      Putting this out there like this: Are we expected to trust this or not. Is this totally up to the reader and his/her background as to whether or not we are to trust the "police union representatives?" Certainly we can all agree that these reps have a reason to make Clark look bad. Why doesn't the writer remind us of that fact?

    19. He cared deeply about his parents — biological and adoptive — and his 14 siblings, and had a job and hopes of going to college.

      What a sentence! I keep reading it and wondering what he would say if he could read it. Twenty-four -- with the last three years in prison, living at times in a motel, and he cared deeply about his parents and 14 siblings!

    20. troubled past that Jamar Clark struggled for years to escape

      Is this a formula? Dragging up a victim's past? And what's going to happen as I read this (again). On my first reading, I was upset with how Jamar was trying (sometimes unsuccessfully) to escape the criminal justice system, and now it finally caught up to him.

  28. Oct 2015
    1. The “patriotic” and supposed “Spanish Only” blanquit@s also can articulate English and Spanish very well while the poor and scrutinized in public schools learn only Spanish. Isn’t it easier and more fruitful to speak about race, language, diaspora openly instead of having a racist and irrational “todos somos iguales” discourse? I guess white supremacy and privilege are more important than caring for our own people. But yes, many white Puerto Ricans have done incredible work for Afro-Puerto Ricans, other black bodies and low-income Puerto Ricans of all hues but rest assured; they are the overwhelming minority.

      William Garcia explains his stance on the importance of acknowledging racism in Puerto Rico gives counter arguments to those who deny it's existence .

  29. Sep 2015
    1. Behind Closed Doors: 'Colorism' in the Caribbean

      Interesting Interview of how being black is perceived in the Caribbean, more specifically in the Dominican Republic.