382 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Aug 2022
    1. David Quammen on Books

      Of course anyone who truly loves books buys more of them than he or she can hope to read in one fleeting lifetime. A good book, resting unopened in its slot on a shelf, full of majestic potentiality, is the most comforting sort of intellectual wallpaper.<br /> —David Quammen (1948 ― ), science, nature, and travel writer in The Boilerplate Rhino: Nature in the Eye of the Beholder

      Syndication link: - https://boffosocko.com/2016/08/03/intellectual-wallpaper/

  3. Jul 2022
    1. It’s very rare that a book gets outthere into the world that has nothing relevant to say toanybody, but your interests may be specific enough thatit may have nothing in it you need to know.

      Similar to Pliny's aphorism "There is no book so bad it does not contain something good.”

    1. Citing Pliny’s “no book so bad,” Gesner made a point of accumulating information about all the texts he could learn about, barbarian and Christian, in manuscript and in print, extant and not, without separating the good from the bad: “We only wanted to list them, and we have left to others free selection and judgment.”202
    1. Democracy: The God That Failed
    2. In his biography of Thiel, The Contrarian: Peter Thiel and Silicon Valley’s Pursuit of Power, Max Chafkin writes
    1. It wasnot until we had completely re-sorted all our innumerable sheets ofpaper according to subjects, thus bringing together all the facts relatingto each, whatever the trade concerned, or the place or the date—andhad shuffled and reshuffled these sheets according to various tentativehypotheses—that a clear, comprehensive and verifiable theory of theworking and results of Trade Unionism emerged in our minds; tobe embodied, after further researches by way of verification, in ourIndustrial Democracy (1897).

      Beatrice Webb was using her custom note taking system in the lead up to the research that resulted in the publication of Industrial Democracy (1897).

      Is there evidence that she was practicing this note taking/database practice earlier than this?

    1. In The Seven Sins of Memory: How the Mind Forgets and Remembers, Schacter identifies seven ways ("sins") that memory can fail us. The seven sins are: Transience, Absent-Mindedness, Blocking, Misattribution, Suggestibility, Persistence, and Bias.[2]
  4. Jun 2022
    1. you can actually see my entire guide 00:27:53 to using hypothesis on my website there's the link there's videos for how to use it with the lms or as a standalone with my assignment all laid out for you and next slide you can also read the full article in 00:28:06 digital reading and writing and composition studies thank
    1. Plan for distraction. If you find it hard to stay focused, don’t fret: it’s completely normal. Our mind is designed to be distracted, to keep on scanning the room around us for new information — or potential danger. Instead of beating yourself up, try to plan your work around your goals and triggers. If your goal is to write a report for an upcoming meeting, you will need a few hours of uninterrupted work. What triggers could get in the way of your focus? Is it your phone, chatty colleagues? Adapt your workspace to minimize these distractions, whether it’s leaving your phone in another room, blocking distracting apps, or locking yourself up in a meeting room with a “do not disturb” post-it note.

      From NessLabs "TEA framework of productivity". This is a not very useful overview on planning for Distraction (lose the door, wae headphones, ect)

    1. If a guy got lucky at a restaurant, it got included.” Jauregui waxes poetic about The Address Book, calling it “sexual memory…told by spaces.”

      Something interesting here about a "gossipy collaboration" of an address book that crystallized a "sexual memory...told by spaces".

    1. Tiago's book follows the general method of the commonplace book, but relies more heavily on a folder-based method and places far less emphasis and value on having a solid index. There isn't any real focus on linking ideas other than putting some things together in the same folder. His experience with the history of the space in feels like it only goes back to some early Ryan Holiday blog posts. He erroneously credits Luhmann with inventing the zettelkasten and Anne-Laure Le Cunff created digital gardens. He's already retracted these in sketch errata here: https://www.buildingasecondbrain.com/endnotes.

      I'll give him at least some credit that there is some reasonable evidence that he actually used his system to write his own book, but the number and depth of his references and experience is exceptionally shallow given the number of years he's been in the space, particularly professionally. He also has some interesting anecdotes and examples of various people including and array of artists and writers which aren't frequently mentioned in the note taking space, so I'll give him points for some diversity of players as well. I'm mostly left with the feeling that he wrote the book because of the general adage that "thought leaders in their space should have a published book in their area to have credibility". Whether or not one can call him a thought leader for "re-inventing" something that Rudolphus Agricola and Desiderius Erasmus firmly ensconced into Western culture about 500 years ago is debatable.

      Stylistically, I'd call his prose a bit florid and too often self-help-y. The four letter acronyms become a bit much after a while. It wavers dangerously close to those who are prone to the sirens' call of the #ProductivityPorn space.

      If you've read a handful of the big articles in the note taking, tools for thought, digital gardens, zettelkasten space, Ahren's book, or regularly keep up with r/antinet or r/Zettelkasten, chances are that you'll be sorely disappointed and not find much insight. If you have friends that don't need the horsepower of Ahrens or zettelkasten, then it might be a reasonable substitute, but then it could have been half the length for the reader.

    1. We are the leading independent Open Access publisher in the Humanities and Social Sciences in the UK: a not-for-profit Social Enterprise run by scholars who are committed to making high-quality research freely available to readers around the world. All our books are available to read online and download for free, with no Book Processing Charges (BPCs) for authors. We publish monographs and textbooks in all areas, offering the academic excellence of a traditional press combined with the speed, convenience and accessibility of digital publishing. We also publish bespoke Series for Universities and Research Centers and invite libraries to support Open Access publishing by joining our Membership Programme.
    1. 人们总是抗拒变革,为什么?詹姆斯·亚当斯(JamesAdams)在《概念障碍》(ConceptualBlockbusting)一书中指出,在面对变革时共有四种障碍,分别是感知障碍(Percep-tualblocks)、情感障碍(emotionalblocks)、文化和环境障碍(culturalandenvironmentalblocks)、知识和表达障碍(intel-lectualandexpressiveblocks)。感知障碍主要是指让人无法清楚认知问题本身造成的障碍,这主要是认知方式造成的,对环境、问题、事件本身缺乏充分的了解,无法从不同角度看问题等等;情感障碍主要是影响变革的情绪、情感障碍,比如说人们害怕风险和失败,害怕不确定性,不喜欢打破习惯,对新观点过早下判断等;文化和环境障碍是来自于外部环境,社会常常会强加一些抑制变革过程的严格准则,对传统的依赖也会阻碍创造性思维;知识障碍主要是因为缺乏解决问题相应的知识基础,或者使用错误的策略解决问题,缺乏灵活性,表达障碍主要是无法有效交流造成的。

      Conceptual Blockbusting

    1. level 2ojboal · 2 hr. agoNot quite understanding the value of Locke's method: far as I understand it, rather than having a list of keywords or phrases, Locke's index is instead based on a combination of first letter and vowel. I can understand how that might be useful for the sake of compression, but doesn't that mean you don't have the benefit of "index as list of keywords/phrases" (or did I miss something)?

      Locke's method is certainly a compact one and is specifically designed for notebooks of several hundred pages where you're slowly growing the index as you go within a limited and usually predetermined amount of space. If you're using an index card or digital system where space isn't an issue, then that specific method may not be as ideal. Whichever option you ultimately choose, it's certainly incredibly valuable and worthwhile to have an index of some sort.

      For those into specifics, here's some detail about creating an index using Hypothes.is data in Obsidian: https://boffosocko.com/2022/05/20/creating-a-commonplace-book-or-zettelkasten-index-from-hypothes-is-tags/ and here's some detail for how I did it for a website built on WordPress: https://boffosocko.com/2021/09/04/an-index-for-my-digital-commonplace-book/

      I'm curious to see how others do this in their tool sets, particularly in ways that remove some of the tedium.

    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awce_j2myQw

      Francis Ford Coppola talks about his notes and notebook on The Godfather.

      He went to the Cafe Trieste to work.

      Coppola had an Olivetti typewriter. (4:20)

      Sections on pitfalls

      I didn't need a script cause I could have made the movie just from this notebook.

    1. Now he’s giving the public a peek into that creative process with The Godfather Notebook (Regan Arts, Nov. 15, $50), an exact reproduction of his original, right down to the handwriting, plus rarely seen photos. A signed $500 limited edition even comes in a replica three-ring binder.

      Francis Ford Coppola published an exact reproduction of his original prompt book for The Godfather called The Godfather Notebook (Regan Arts, 2016).

    2. To organize his thoughts, Coppola made a “prompt book,” a theater trick he learned in college at Hofstra. Into a three-ring binder he stuffed his annotated copy of the novel, scene-by-scene breakdowns, notes on the times and setting, cliches to avoid and casting ideas.

      Francis Ford Coppola created and used a prompt book to organize his notes and annotations on Mario Puzo's The Godfather to create the 1972 Paramount blockbuster.

      Having learned the stage managers' technique of keeping a prompt book at Hofstra, his contained an annotated copy of the novel with scene-by-scene breakdowns, notes on setting, cliches to avoid, and even casting ideas.

    1. a short documentary titled Francis Coppola’s Notebook3released in 2001, Coppola explained his process.

      I've seen a short snippet of this, but I suspect it's longer and has more depth.


      The citation of this documentary here via IMDb.com is just lame. Cite the actual movie and details for finding and watching it please.


      Apparently the entirety of the piece is just the 10 minutes I saw.

    2. Coppola’s strategy for making the complex, multifaceted filmrested on a technique he learned studying theater at HofstraCollege, known as a “prompt book.”
    1. The course Marginalia in Books from Christopher Ohge is just crying out to have an annotated syllabus.

      Wish I could follow along directly, but there's some excellent reference material hiding in the brief outline of the course.


      Perhaps a list of interesting people here too for speaking at https://iannotate.org/ 2022 hiding in here? A session on the history of annotation and marginalia could be cool there.

    2. Archaeology of Reading project

      https://archaeologyofreading.org/

      The Archaeology of Reading in Early Modern Europe (AOR) uses digital technologies to enable the systematic exploration of the historical reading practices of Renaissance scholars nearly 450 years ago. This is possible through AOR’s corpus of thirty-six fully digitized and searchable versions of early printed books filled with tens of thousands of handwritten notes, left by two of the most dedicated readers of the early modern period: John Dee and Gabriel Harvey.


      Perhaps some overlap here with: - Workshop in the History of Material Texts https://pennmaterialtexts.org/about/events/ - Book Traces https://booktraces.org via Andrew Stauffer, et al. - Schoenberg Institute's Coffe with a Codex https://schoenberginstitute.org/coffee-with-a-codex/ (perhaps to a lesser degree)

    1. Spreading the Word. Communicating about the concept by highlighting the work of institutions that have established zero-textbook-cost degrees has great potential to attract mainstream media and create an atmosphere of excitement around the idea.

      The library is a great channel for spreading the word. Through the library we can engage with both teachers and learners and can help get them excited over the idea. There are great potential benefits to both sides, as teachers can actually tailor the material to their own contexts and learning goals. And the benefits for students of course is the affordability and access to the resources meaning there is no discrepancy between students who are financially comfortable from those who struggle to afford the basic resource requirement of courses they are enrolled in. it should be a requirement, of public institutions in particular, to make at least the core course work available to the students enrolled.

    1. Around 1941, Barzun took on a larger classroom, becoming the moderator of the CBS radio program “Invitation to Learning,” which aired on Sunday mornings and featured four or five intellectual lights discussing books. From commenting on books, it was, apparently, a short step to selling them. In 1951, Barzun, Trilling, and W. H. Auden started up the Readers’ Subscription Book Club, writing monthly appreciations of books that they thought the public would benefit from reading. The club lasted for eleven years, partly on the strength of the recommended books, which ranged from Kenneth Grahame’s “The Wind in the Willows” to Hannah Arendt’s “The Human Condition,” and partly on the strength of the editors’ reputations.
    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWkwOefBPZY

      Some of the basic outline of this looks like OER (Open Educational Resources) and its "five Rs": Retain, Reuse, Revise, Remix and/or Redistribute content. (To which I've already suggested the sixth: Request update (or revision control).

      Some of this is similar to:

      The Read Write Web is no longer sufficient. I want the Read Fork Write Merge Web. #osb11 lunch table. #diso #indieweb [Tantek Çelik](http://tantek.com/2011/174/t1/read-fork-write-merge-web-osb110

      Idea of collections of learning as collections or "playlists" or "readlists". Similar to the old tool Readlist which bundled articles into books relatively easily. See also: https://boffosocko.com/2022/03/26/indieweb-readlists-tools-and-brainstorming/

      Use of Wiki version histories

      Some of this has the form of a Wiki but with smaller nuggets of information (sort of like Tiddlywiki perhaps, which also allows for creating custom orderings of things which had specific URLs for displaying and sharing them.) The Zettelkasten idea has some of this embedded into it. Shared zettelkasten could be an interesting thing.

      Data is the new soil. A way to reframe "data is the new oil" but as a part of the commons. This fits well into the gardens and streams metaphor.

      Jerry, have you seen Matt Ridley's work on Ideas Have Sex? https://www.ted.com/talks/matt_ridley_when_ideas_have_sex Of course you have: https://app.thebrain.com/brains/3d80058c-14d8-5361-0b61-a061f89baf87/thoughts/3e2c5c75-fc49-0688-f455-6de58e4487f1/attachments/8aab91d4-5fc8-93fe-7850-d6fa828c10a9

      I've heard Jerry mention the idea of "crystallization of knowledge" before. How can we concretely link this version with Cesar Hidalgo's work, esp. Why Information Grows.

      Cross reference Jerry's Brain: https://app.thebrain.com/brains/3d80058c-14d8-5361-0b61-a061f89baf87/thoughts/4bfe6526-9884-4b6d-9548-23659da7811e/notes

  5. May 2022
    1. Thus, the sensitive seismographer of avant-garde develop-ments, Walter Benjamin, logically conceived of this scenario in 1928, of communicationwith card indices rather than books: “And even today, as the current scientific methodteaches us, the book is an archaic intermediate between two different card indexsystems. For everything substantial is found in the slip box of the researcher who wroteit and the scholar who studies in it, assimilated into its own card index.” 47
      1. Walter Benjamin, Einbahnstra ß e, in Gesammelte Schriften, vol. 4 (Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp Verlag, 1928/1981), 98 – 140, at 103.

      Does Walter Benjamin prefigure the idea of card indexes conversing with themselves in a communicative method similar to that of Vannevar Bush's Memex?

      This definitely sounds like the sort of digital garden inter-communication afforded by the Anagora as suggested by @Flancian.

    1. From this he concluded he was “an arrogant jerk”, he writes in his book, leading to a wave of soul-searching and from there his “principles”. Their gist is that executives need to embrace their worst failures, study them, give each other honest feedback — or tough love — about their character and skills, and aggressively debate their views with “radical transparency”. Employees not only rank each other on iPads, but also record all their interactions.

      .

    2. Now, however, he has changed tack: by publishing Principles: Life & Work, he says he hopes to show that the critics are wrong

      .

    1. Every bit of new information fills in the blanks of a time that has long since passed out of living memory.

      Our written records have increased incalculably because our living memory doesn't serve us or our society or culture the way it previously did in pre-literate times. The erasure of cruelties and tyrrany is all to easy when we rely only on literacy, particularly when book banning and erasure can easily become the norm.

    1. Don't think of this asa a book. Think of it as a flashlight. You and your team have fumbled in the dark long enough. Now you've got something bright and powerful to help you find a new way.

    Tags

    Annotators

  6. Apr 2022
    1. Book review

      Cook, Trevor. “Review: Blair, Ann M. Too Much to Know: Managing Scholarly Information Before the Modern Age. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2010. Pp. Xv, 397. ISBN 978-0-300-11251-1 (Hardcover) $45.” Renaissance and Reformation 33, no. 4 (December 12, 2011): 109–11. https://doi.org/10.33137/rr.v33i4.15975.

      Note that they've accidentally used the word "in" instead of "Before" in the title of the book.

    1. Much of Barthes’ intellectual and pedagogical work was producedusing his cards, not just his published texts. For example, Barthes’Collège de France seminar on the topic of the Neutral, thepenultimate course he would take prior to his death, consisted offour bundles of about 800 cards on which was recorded everythingfrom ‘bibliographic indications, some summaries, notes, andprojects on abandoned figures’ (Clerc, 2005: xxi-xxii).

      In addition to using his card index for producing his published works, Barthes also used his note taking system for teaching as well. His final course on the topic of the Neutral, which he taught as a seminar at Collège de France, was contained in four bundles consisting of 800 cards which contained everything from notes, summaries, figures, and bibliographic entries.


      Given this and the easy portability of index cards, should we instead of recommending notebooks, laptops, or systems like Cornell notes, recommend students take notes directly on their note cards and revise them from there? The physicality of the medium may also have other benefits in terms of touch, smell, use of colors on them, etc. for memory and easy regular use. They could also be used physically for spaced repetition relatively quickly.

      Teachers using their index cards of notes physically in class or in discussions has the benefit of modeling the sort of note taking behaviors we might ask of our students. Imagine a classroom that has access to a teacher's public notes (electronic perhaps) which could be searched and cross linked by the students in real-time. This would also allow students to go beyond the immediate topic at hand, but see how that topic may dovetail with the teachers' other research work and interests. This also gives greater meaning to introductory coursework to allow students to see how it underpins other related and advanced intellectual endeavors and invites the student into those spaces as well. This sort of practice could bring to bear the full weight of the literacy space which we center in Western culture, for compare this with the primarily oral interactions that most teachers have with students. It's only in a small subset of suggested or required readings that students can use for leveraging the knowledge of their teachers while all the remainder of the interactions focus on conversation with the instructor and questions that they might put to them. With access to a teacher's card index, they would have so much more as they might also query that separately without making demands of time and attention to their professors. Even if answers aren't immediately forthcoming from the file, then there might at least be bibliographic entries that could be useful.

      I recently had the experience of asking a colleague for some basic references about the history and culture of the ancient Near East. Knowing that he had some significant expertise in the space, it would have been easier to query his proverbial card index for the lived experience and references than to bother him with the burden of doing work to pull them up.

      What sorts of digital systems could help to center these practices? Hypothes.is quickly comes to mind, though many teachers and even students will prefer to keep their notes private and not public where they're searchable.

      Another potential pathway here are systems like FedWiki or anagora.org which provide shared and interlinked note spaces. Have any educators attempted to use these for coursework? The closest I've seen recently are public groups using shared Roam Research or Obsidian-based collections for book clubs.

    1. An initial stage of annotation might be provided bya professional reader hired to add aids to reading for the owner, including espe-cially mnemonic or meditative aids, or enhancements to the layout, but alsooccasionally self-reflexive or potentially dissenting observations.24 A successionof owner-readers could then add further corrections and comments.

      Stages of annotation in the medieval period


      When is Hypothes.is going to branch out into the business of professional readers to add aids to texts?! :)

      Link this to the professional summary industry that reads books and summarizes them for busy executives

      Link this to the annotations studied by Owen Gingerich in The Book Nobody Read.

    2. The moralist critique of ostentatious book owning articulated by Seneca in the first century CE was at the core of Sebastian Brant’s complaints in his Ship of Fools (1494).19

      Compare this idea to the recent descriptions of modern homes using books solely for decoration or simply as "wallpaper".

    3. The largest pri-vate collections reached 3,000 or 4,500 volumes in the late sixteenth century and tens of thousands of volumes in the mid- eighteenth century. (Hans Sloan owned 45,000 books and 4,000 manuscripts at his death in 1753.)194
    4. To make a more radical correction, printers could also replace a whole page or quire with a new one (called a cancel).
    5. Medieval manuscripts did not include title pages, and bibliographers identify them by incipit or opening words: no special markers were needed to recognize a book that one had commissioned and waited for while it was copied.185 By contrast, a printed book needed to ap-peal to buyers who had no advance knowledge of the book, so the title page served as an advertisement, announcing title and author, printer and/or book-seller (where the book could be purchased), generally a date of publication, and also additional boasts about useful features—“very copious indexes” or a “cor-rected and much augmented” text. T
    6. On leaf numbering in the Middle Ages, see Saenger (1996), 258, 275–76, and Stoneman (1999), 6. Saenger notes nonetheless that printing created the context in which leaf numbering flourished in both print and manuscript.

      Leaf numbering was seen in the Middle Ages, but printing in the Renaissance greatly increased the number of books with page numbers.

  7. Mar 2022
    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NsRFTd1MndM

      Synoptic Obsidian Book Club

      Tentative Schedule beginning on Saturday, March 26, 2022

      Week 1

      Paul: Introduction and Part 1 Blair: Chapter 1

      Week 2

      Paul:Part 2 Blair:Chapter 2

      Week 3

      Paul: Part 3 Blair: Chapter 3

      Week 4

      Paul: Conclusion Blair: Chapter 4

      Week 5

      Paul: Any overflow from before?? Blair: Chapter 5

      Week 6

      (just in case we go over a bit???)

      Paul: Blair:

      Looks like the schedule in the Vault has changed to starting April 2

    1. Putin's Early Bird History Book Russia's occupation on Ukraine and innocent mass murder marked a sign of harassing human life simply because of greed, arrogance and pride. Why they (or we) don't realize if those things only temporary and soon people will write you on the dark side of history books. Surely the topic is about "The most horrible humankind ever lived on earth". This book contains long list and every generation provide it and this period is you. Pray for your after life, Comrade!

      Humanity for all human As seen on: Free Ads Groups sidebar

  8. Feb 2022
    1. If you now think: “That’s ridiculous. Who would want to read andpretend to learn just for the illusion of learning and understanding?”please look up the statistics: The majority of students chooses everyday not to test themselves in any way. Instead, they apply the verymethod research has shown again (Karpicke, Butler, and Roediger2009) and again (Brown 2014, ch. 1) to be almost completelyuseless: rereading and underlining sentences for later rereading.And most of them choose that method, even if they are taught thatthey don’t work.

      Even when taught that some methods of learning don't work, students will still actively use and focus on them.


      Are those using social annotation purposely helping students to steer clear of these methods? is there evidence that the social part of some of these related annotation or conversational practices with both the text and one's colleagues helpful? Do they need to be taken out of the text and done in a more explicit manner in a lecture/discussion section or in a book club like setting similar to that of Dan Allossso's or even within a shared space like the Obsidian book club to have more value?

    1. Indeed, the Jose-phinian card index owes its continued use to the failure to achieve a bound

      catalog, until a successor card catalog comes along in 1848. Only the<br /> absence of a bound repertory allows the paper slip aggregate to answer all inquiries about a book ’ s whereabouts after 1781. Thus, a failed undertaking tacitly turns into a success story.

      The Josephinian card index was created, in part on the ideas of Konrad Gessner's slip method, by accumulating slips which could be rearranged and then copied down permanently. While there was the chance that the original cards could be disordered, the fact that the approximately 300,000 cards in 205 small boxes were estimated to fill 50 to 60 folio volumes with time and expense to print it dissuaded the creation of a long desired compiled book of books. These problems along with the fact that new books being added later was sure to only compound problems of having a single reference. This failure to have a bound catalog of books unwittingly resulted in the success of the index card catalog.

  9. Jan 2022
    1. Books can indeed be dangerous. Until “Close Quarters,” I believed stories had the power to save me. That novel taught me that stories also had the power to destroy me. I was driven to become a writer because of the complex power of stories. They are not inert tools of pedagogy. They are mind-changing, world-changing.

      —Viet Thanh Nguyen

  10. Dec 2021
    1. Mr. Byers coined a term — “book-wrapt” — to describe the exhilarating comfort of a well-stocked library.
    2. Lisa Jacobs, the founder and chief executive of Imagine It Done, a home organization service in New York City, said that out of hundreds of projects in the past few years, she can recall only three requests to organize books. In one of those examples, the arranged books were treated as a backdrop — to be admired, but not read. “The clientele that has collected books through the years are not as numerous for us,” she said.

      Any book collector worth their salt will already have in mind the way they want their collection arranged. Only someone who wants to use it as wallpaper would have a service arrange it.

      I wonder what the other two cases were?

    1. This book reminds me of me because I am funny. I like to joke around make funny faces and make people laugh. Yes I would recommend this book to reader’s ages 8-12 years old because it is hilarious and a good story. I think the drawings might interest the readers of this book.

      Recommendations

    2. My Favorite part is when teenagers are in a truck and there is a teenager in the back of the tuck who sprays something at Greg and Rowley and it was Halloween night and they said they was going to call the cop on them. I found Greg intersting because he was funny and he took things seriously. He says funny things and he is a nice kid and he knows what is right and what’s wrong. The illustrator used black and white drawings and stick men. I thought the illustrations were funny and some of them made me laugh.

      Evaluation + characters

    3. This book is about the first day Greg Heffley went to middle school. Greg thought he was sitting between two morons in the first day of middle school. It was Halloween night and Greg is dad favorite holiday is Halloween. Greg and Rowley were running away from a people with a chainsaw on Halloween night then Greg mom came and ask what is going on here.

      PLOT: Is this enough? Have you read it? Does it really capture the essence of the book?

    1. I would recommend this book. I think a good reader would like this book because they would understand it more. It would interest the reader. The plot is weird you never no what's going to happen next. The setting is in Camp Green Lake and the mountains. The author writes with simple words and it is easy to read.

      Recommendation

      What things DON'T belong in this paragraph?

    2. I really enjoyed reading this book because it was very interesting and it is a good book to read. My favorite part in the book is when they threw the shoes at Stanley because he fell funny. One of the characters reminded me of myself because I didn't know how to read like Zero, but now I do, and so does Zero because Stanley taught him. When I read this book I felt like I was there digging up holes and finding stuff underground.

      Evaluation + Characters

    3. This book is about a kid named Stanley Yalnats. One day he walked under the bridge and a kid had tossed some shoes off the bridge . They fell on Stanley and he fell when they fell on top of him. So about five minutes later the "'Police'" thought that he had stolen them, that's how he went to Camp Green Lake. When he went there he met a lot of people there. Their names were Zig-zag , Armpits , Zero , Twitch. They were good friends, but Zero didn't know how to read, so Caveman showed him. Stanley met them and they had to dig holes with his friends. About a year later Stanley left Camp Green Lake.

      Plot and characters. Is this first paragraph appealing? Does it capture the readers' attention? Why? Why not?

    1. I recommend this book because it has a positive story line. Lots of teenage girls would like this book because it is humorous but realistic. The plot would hold the interest of readers because it makes you laugh and think. I would also recommend this book to anyone who liked reading The Princess Diaries because it is by the same author.

      Recommendations

    2. I really enjoyed this book. It was very funny and genuine. Samantha was funny because of her attitude and her "protests" like wearing all black. This book was very well-written. It goes into great depth about how we look at things in life and has great characterization. Samantha changed and grew in the book. By the end, she looked at art and love very differently. I felt this book was easy to relate to because it isn't perfect like a Cinderella story. It describes how life really is and is a very positive story.

      Evaluation + Themes + Characters

    3. Samantha Madison is an outsider. She dresses all in black because she mourns the loss of the art supplies at her school. She is in love with her older sister's boyfriend and the enemy of Kris Parks (the most popular girl at school). After saving the president's life, Samantha's world turns upside down. She is now the most popular girl in the USA and appointed Teen Ambassador for the UN. And the president's son just might be in love with her. Samantha learns a lot about life, love and common sense - but does SHE love the president's son?

      PLOT: What details are included? What is left out? How does the reviewer avoid giving spoilers

  11. Nov 2021
    1. In Bound to Read, Jeffrey Todd Knight excavates this culture of compilation—of binding and mixing texts, authors, and genres into single volumes—and sheds light on a practice that not only was pervasive but also defined the period's very ways of writing and thinking.
    2. In this early period of print, before the introduction of commercial binding, most published literary texts did not stand on shelves in discrete, standardized units. They were issued in loose sheets or temporarily stitched—leaving it to the purchaser or retailer to collect, configure, and bind them.

      In the early history of printing, books weren't as we see them now, instead they were issued in loose sheets or with temporary stitching allowing the purchaser or retailer to collect, organize, and bind them. This pattern occurs at a time when one would have been thinking about collecting, writing, and organizing one's notes in a commonplace book or other forms. It is likely a pattern that would have influenced this era of note taking practices, especially among the most literate who were purchasing and using books.

    3. This looks interesting with respect to the flows of the history of commonplace books.

      Making the Miscellany: Poetry, Print, and the History of the Book in Early Modern England by Megan Heffernan

  12. Oct 2021
    1. The Hidden History of the Geodesic Dome - Part 3: The Teamwork of Walter Gropius

      The Hidden History of the Geodesic Dome - Part 3: The Teamwork of Walter Gropius

      Understanding one’s limitations leads to a recognition of the power of relationships in an interconnected and interdependent world.

    2. Because of his handicap, Walter Gropius achieved his goals by working through other people, and harnessed their abilities to produce efficient and practical architecture.

      The Hidden History of the Geodesic Dome - Part 3: The Teamwork of Walter Gropius

      Understanding one’s limitations leads to a recognition of the power of relationships in an interconnected and interdependent world.

    1. Alicia Boole Stott

      Alicia was the only Boole sister to inherit the mathematical career of her parents, although her mother Mary Everest Boole had brought up all of her five children from an early age 'to acquaint them with the flow of geometry' by projecting shapes onto paper, hanging pendulums etc. She was first exposed to geometric models by her brother-in-law Charles Howard Hinton when she was 17, and developed the ability to visualise in a fourth dimension. She found that there were exactly six regular polytopes in four dimensions and that they are bounded by 5, 16 or 600 tetrahedra, 8 cubes, 24 octahedra or 120 dodecahedra.

    1. Team syntegrity and democratic group decision making: theory and practice

      Team Syntegrity

      Stafford Beer created Team Syntegrity as a methodology for social interaction that predisposes participants towards shared agreement among varied and sometimes conflicting interests, without compromising the legitimate claims and integrity of those interests. This paper outlines the methodology and the underlying philosophy, describing several applications in a variety of countries and contexts, indicating why such an approach causes us to re-think more traditional approaches to group decision processes, and relating Team Syntegrity to other systems approaches.

      Shared by Kirby Urner in the Trimtab Book Club

  13. Sep 2021
    1. Second Reading Mr CHIFLEY:Prime Minister and Treasurer · Macquarie · ALP – I move - That the bill be now read a second time.

      Bibliography

    1. The Liberal party has so much money that it does not know what to do with it. It has so much money that it has fallen over itself to hand it out to too many fools to carry out its advertising. However, if the right honorable gentleman would like to arrange some sort of Marshall aid on a political basis whereby the Labour party, which desires to survive as the bulwark of democracy just as Great Britain does, we shall be happy to receive some assistance. Mr Menzies:

      Battle of the Banks

    1. I've been wanting to read Zinn, so perhaps this is a good place to follow along? A sort of pseudo book club perhaps?

      It's interesting to see Dan struggle with an obvious listicle article in Forbes as an authoritative source. This example is a great indicator that Forbes online has created far too much of a content farm to be taken seriously anymore. From what I've seen of it over the past several years it's followed the business model of The Huffington Post before Huffington sold it and cashed out. My supposition is that Forbes is providing a platform for people to get reach and isn't actually paying those writers to create their content.

      Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vlnYt9NOUAw

    1. Author and librarian Nancy Pearl advocates the “Rule of 50.” This entails reading the first 50 pages of a book and then deciding if it is worth finishing. The Rule of 50 has an interesting feature: once you are over the age of 50, subtract your age from 100 and read that many pages. Pearl writes: “And if, at the bottom of Page 50, all you are really interested in is who marries whom, or who the murderer is, then turn to the last page and find out. If it’s not on the last page, turn to the penultimate page, or the antepenultimate page, or however far back you have to go to discover what you want to know.…When you are 51 years of age or older, subtract your age from 100, and the resulting number (which, of course, gets smaller every year) is the number of pages you should read before you can guiltlessly give up on a book.…When you turn 100, you are authorized (by the Rule of 50) to judge a book by its cover.”
    1. punctum books encourages projects that profit from formal risks and possibly engage with supposedly outmoded or ‘quaint’ genres—the abcedarium, (auto)commentary, summa, bestiary, dialogue, case study, compendium, speculum/mirror, conduct manual, letter/address, apologia pro vita sua, hagiography, elegy, postcard, telegraph/telegram, inter-office memo, encyclopedia, forgery, hidden writing, source-fiction, natural history, leechbook, atlas, colloquium, colophon, commonplace book, telephone book, rolodex, field report, romance, dialogue, dream vision, catalogue, sonnet cycle, poetics, treatise, manifesto, prosody, calendar, morality play, marginalia, interlinear translation, digest, microfiche, concordance, book of hours, pastoral/eclogue, polemic, epigram, broadsheet, flyer, note-book, breviarium, collationes/collectio, book of nature, testament, proof, manual, pamphlet, miscellany, chapbook, captivity narrative, penny dreadful, testament, manual, discography, catena, liner notes, autopsy, exegesis, rule, antiphonary, legend, fax, travelogue, etymologiae, lai, excerpt, curiosity cabinet, disputation, computus, comedy of errors, soliloquy, essay, bulletin, evangeliary, gloss, meditation, fable, florilegium, myth, fairy tale, purchase order, carbon copy, transcript/transcryptum, blueprint, psalter, micrologue, lyric, daytimer, inventory, annal/chronicle, pipe roll, receipt/invoice, watch-list, charter, canon, and so on ad infinitum. Surprise yourself.

      This is a great list of book types, genres, etc.