4 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2021
    1. This focusing upon our own oppression is embodied in the concept of identity politics. We believe that the most profound and potentially most radical politics come directly out of our own identity, as opposed to working to end somebody else's oppression. In the case of Black women this is a particularly repugnant, dangerous, threatening, and therefore revolutionary concept because it is obvious from looking at all the political movements that have preceded us that anyone is more worthy of liberation than ourselves. We reject pedestals, queenhood, and walking ten paces behind. To be recognized as human, levelly human, is enough.We believe that sexual politics under patriarchy is as pervasive in Black women's lives as are the politics of class and race. We also often find it difficult to separate race from class from sex oppression because in our lives they are most often experienced simultaneously. We know that there is such a thing as racial-sexual oppression which is neither solely racial nor solely sexual, e.g., the history of rape of Black women by white men as a weapon of political repression.

      pls read. u hate neo/liberal representation politics. not identity politics.

  2. Oct 2018
    1. There is no such thing as a single-issue struggle, because we do not live single-issue lives” (138). Indigenous identities, much like other identities, simply cannot be separated out in this simplistic way

      Indigenous identities are complex and only focusing on one issue alienates people and it fails to address a lot of the struggles that indigenous people may face.

  3. Feb 2016
    1. In our world, divide and conquer must become define and empower.

      This sentence seems as quotable to me as the one about the "master's tools", and more self-explanatory.

    2. Those of us who stand outside the circle of this society's definition of acceptable women; those of us who have been forged in the crucibles of difference -- those of us who are poor, who are lesbians, who are Black, who are older -- know that survival is not an academic skill. It is learning how to take our differences and make them strengths. For the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house. They may allow us temporarily to beat him at his own game, but they will never enable us to bring about genuine change. And this fact is only threatening to those women who still define the master's house as their only source of support

      I've been familiar with the phrase "for the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house" for a while, but had never read it in the original context.

      It seems to me that Lorde is talking about any number of structures that enforce or maintain oppressive orders. The most immediate such structure to this context appears to be a discourse that presumes difference must be "other" one against another and thereby systematically overlooks difference to generalize about women — fear of being oppressive counter-intuitively leading to oppression.