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  1. Last 7 days
    1. Structural Racism as SDH: -Examples: 1) Home Health workers not eligible for paid leave causing disproportionate harm when injured 2) Nursing Home: SSA funded private long term care for the elderly and prohibited funding for institutions for AA individuals Laws 1) Often don't address root causes. For example, anti-discrimination laws legitimizes existing structures

    1. Human empathy in the perception of nature

      Many people seem to think that a universal conception of morality requires that we find moral principles that admit no exceptions. If, for instance, it is indeed wrong to lie, it must always be wrong to lie—and if one can find a single exception, any notion of moral truth must be abandoned. However, the existence of moral truth—that is, the connection between how we think and behave and our well-being—does not require defining morality in terms of unvarying moral precepts. Morality could be a lot like chess: some principles generally apply, but they might admit to essential exceptions. If you want to play good chess, a principle like “Do not lose your Queen” is almost always worth following. Nevertheless, it admits exceptions: sometimes sacrificing your Queen is a brilliant thing to do; occasionally, it is the only thing you can do. However, it remains a fact that from any position in a game of chess, there will be a range of objectively right moves and objectively bad ones. Suppose there are objective truths to be known about human well-being—if kindness, for instance. It is generally more conducive to happiness than cruelty is—then science should one day be able to make exact claims about which of our behaviors and uses of attention are morally right, which are neutral, and worth abandoning (Harris 2010).

      Harris, Sam. The Moral of Landscape. New York: Free Press, 2010.

    1. To silence circular dependencies warnings for let's say moment library use: // rollup.config.js import path from 'path' const onwarn = warning => { // Silence circular dependency warning for moment package if ( warning.code === 'CIRCULAR_DEPENDENCY' && !warning.importer.indexOf(path.normalize('node_modules/moment/src/lib/')) ) { return } console.warn(`(!) ${warning.message}`) }
    1. Handling all these requests costs us considerably: servers, bandwidth and human time spent analyzing traffic patterns and devising methods to limit or block excessive new request patterns. We would much rather use these assets elsewhere, for example improving the software and services needed by W3C and the Web Community.
    1. For the law ofnature, like every law concerning men in this world, would befutile if no-one had power to enforce it and thereby preservethe innocent and restrain offenders

      agrees with Hobbes in that laws of nature need an enforcer- just instead says every man has this power

    1. A simple rule of thumb: the name of the updated variable must appear on the left hand side of the assignment. For example this... const foo = obj.foo; foo.bar = 'baz';...won't update references to obj.foo.bar, unless you follow it up with obj = obj.
    1. you are granting us the right to use your User Content without the obligation to pay royalties to any third party
    2. You or the owner of your User Content still own the copyright in User Content sent to us, but by submitting User Content via the Services, you hereby grant us an unconditional irrevocable, non-exclusive, royalty-free, fully transferable, perpetual worldwide licence to use, modify, adapt, reproduce, make derivative works of, publish and/or transmit, and/or distribute and to authorise other users of the Services and other third-parties to view, access, use, download, modify, adapt, reproduce, make derivative works of, publish and/or transmit your User Content in any format and on any platform, either now known or hereinafter invented.
    1. He took three paces—with the fourth he reached his goal,       

      Interesting depiction of the actual size of gods here. If Poseidon was this large, how large would other gods appear such as Zeus? Or even Cronus, as literature suggests he too has a physical form. Would gods be able to show their true form to humans? Or is this why Zeus often appears as other beings when interacting with mortals.

  2. Oct 2020
    1. Listening for External Changes By wrapping a stateful ExternalModificationDetector component in a Field component, we can listen for changes to a field's value, and by knowing whether or not the field is active, deduce when a field's value changes due to external influences.
    1. I run s.search() by typing into an input box, and if I type gibberish very quickly, the console prints out "making search request" on every key press, so many times per second -- indicating that it hasn't been debounced at all.
    1. // Make a HOC
      // This is not the only way to accomplish auto-save, but it does let us:
      // - Use built-in React lifecycle methods to listen for changes
      // - Maintain state of when we are submitting
      // - Render a message when submitting
      // - Pass in debounce and save props nicely
      export default props => (
        <FormSpy {...props} subscription={{ values: true }} component={AutoSave} />
      );
      
    1. Link to https://ponyfill.com in your readme. Example. Add ponyfill to the keywords section in package.json.
    1. Cognitive Presence “is the extent to which learners are able to construct and confirm meaning through sustained reflection and discourse” (Community of Inquiry, n.d, para. 5). Video is often used as a unidirectional medium with information flowing from the expert or instructor to the learner. To move from transmission of content to construction of knowledge, tools such as Voice Thread (VoiceThread, 2016) support asynchronous conversation in a multimedia format.

      The author, Kendra Grant, is the Director of Professional Development and Learning for Quillsoft in Toronto Canada. Grant helps business succeed in education design and support. In this article Grant discusses how quickly the learning environment has changed through technological development. Grant explores the RAT Model, which guides instructors in the "use of technology to help transform instructional practice." Grant then examines the Community of Inquiry model, which seeks to create meaningful instruction through social, cognitive and teaching presence. Grant concludes by providing general principles for creating a positive video presence.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. 15 Fall Scenarios

      The authors, Edward J. Maloney and Joshua Kim, wrote a total of 15 articles describing various scenarios for the university learning environment during COVID-19. This article summarizes each of these more detailed plans including "normal" and moving the Fall term to the Spring. They also describe various learning models including HyFlex, modularity, virtual, and remote.

      Rating: 7/10

    1. Online learning, blended learning, flipped learning, hybrid learning, flexible learning, open learning and distance education are all terms that are often used inter-changeably, but there are significant differences in meaning. More importantly, these forms of education, once considered somewhat esoteric and out of the mainstream of conventional education, are increasingly taking on greater significance and in some cases becoming mainstream themselves. As teachers and instructors become more familiar and confident with online learning and new technologies, there will be more innovative methods developing all the time.

      The author, Anthony Bates, holds a BA in Psychology and a Ph.D. in Educational Administration. He holds over 40 years of teaching experience. In this chapter he proposes online learning is a mode of delivery versus a teaching method. In this chapter Bates compares teaching delivery methods, defines which mode students need, and weighs in on the choice between face-to-face and online teaching.

      Rating: 10/10

    1. Once again, this isn’t good or bad, it’s just the most efficient way to create something that is similar to something else
    2. For years, I’ve shared with friends and clients what I call the bunny theory of code. The theory is that code multiplies when you’re not looking, not unlike bunnies that tend to multiply when you’re not looking.
    3. Anyone who’s ever worked with me knows that I place a very high value on what ends up checked-in to a source code repository.
    4. Checking in is akin to sharing your code with others, and once out in the world, it’s hard to predict what that code will do.
    1. nzaka's theory of bunny code is relevant here
    2. mixing the turing complete of javascript with the markup of HTML eliminates the readability of JSX so that it is actually harder to parse than a solution like hyperscript
    3. I'm okay with an overall design that allows people to plugin the parts they need in order to be able to generically support a compile-to-javascript language, but to bake in support for one singular solution because its popular is simply bad engineering.
    4. One of the primary tasks of engineers is to minimize complexity. JSX changes such a fundamental part (syntax and semantics of the language) that the complexity bubbles up to everything it touches. Pretty much every pipeline tool I've had to work with has become far more complex than necessary because of JSX. It affects AST parsers, it affects linters, it affects code coverage, it affects build systems. That tons and tons of additional code that I now need to wade through and mentally parse and ignore whenever I need to debug or want to contribute to a library that adds JSX support.
    5. Yes, you can embed loops in it and compose lots of small repeated JSX snippets, but that almost never happens in practice because mixing the turing complete of javascript with the markup of HTML eliminates the readability of JSX so that it is actually harder to parse than a solution like hyperscript (the syntactical approach taken by virtual-dom).
    6. Supporting JSX out of the box is the engineering equivalent of Mozilla supporting DRM out of the box in FireFox.
    7. If the react cargo cult didn't have the JSX cowpath paved for them and acclimated to describing their app interface with vanilla javascript, they'd cargo cult around that. It's really about the path of least resistance and familiarity.
    8. I'm personally open to any other solutions, especially in how we might be able to untie from React, but, for now, inline-XML markup (JSX) is OK with me.
    9. @subfuzion That error looks unrelated to the existing discussion.

      I assume they locked it in reaction to someone posting something unrelated / off-topic.

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    1. Other frameworks, which use a template syntax built atop HTML — Svelte, Vue, Ractive, Glimmer etc — have historically been fragmented, meaning those tools need to be reinvented many times.
    1. For the sake of best compatibility we convert the className attribute to class for svelte.

      Svelte refuses to standardize on any way to pass a CSS class. I thought className was actually the most common name for this prop though even in Svelte...

    1. In the next major, we'll start copying the ref onto both the props and the element.ref. React will now use the props.ref as the source of truth for forwardRef and classes and it will still create a shallow copy of props that excludes the ref in these cases. At the same time, we'll add a getter for element.ref in DEV that warns if you access it. The upgrade path is now to just access it off props if you need it from the element.
    2. Additionally, if we ever want to standardize more of JSX we need to start moving away from some of the more esoteric legacy behaviors of React.
    1. The problem is that the since both the JSX transpiler and the traceur compiler are actually parsing the full javascript AST, they would have to mutually agree on the syntax extensions you use: traceur can't parse the faux-xml syntax JSX adds, and JSX can't parse the async or await keywords, for example, or generator functions.
    1. This balancing act needs to take into account project complexity (size, distribution, etc.), uncertainty (risk, innovation need, etc.), and the cost of change at the project level and for each major component.
    2. Compounding the problem of iteration disguised as oscillation is the cost of change.
    1. they found that the glyoxylate and pyruvate reacted to make a range of compounds that included chemical analogues to all the intermediary products in the TCA cycle except for citric acid. Moreover, these products all formed in water within a single reaction vessel, at temperatures and pH conditions mild enough to be compatible with conditions on Earth.
    1. According to the endurantist view, material objects are persisting three-dimensional individuals wholly present at every moment of their existence
    1. Lei, Simon A., et al. "Strategies for improving reading comprehension among college students." Reading Improvement, vol. 47, no. 1, Spring 2010, p. 30+. Gale Academic OneFile, https://link.gale.com/apps/doc/A221203907/AONE?u=azstatelibdev&sid=AONE&xid=6ed72e73. Accessed 12 Oct. 2020.

      Description: This article delves into the importance of comprehension and vocabulary for college level students. It outlines different tools students can use online to help them comprehend such as annotations and graphic organizers.

      Rating: 9/10

      Reasoning for the rating: This article uses many sources as it describes the methods to best comprehend complex texts. It also takes time to explain the importance of comprehension in English classes as well as outside. It supports each method with an example or explanation for the success of the model. Though it touches upon ineffective methods, it does not delve into why they fail.

    1. Description: Banner discusses the correlation between literacy blogs and reading comprehension in students. He outlines the relationship between socialization and motivation. Furthermore, he describes the steps a teacher can use to implement literature blogs in their classroom.

      Rating: 7/10

      Reason for the rating: Banner uses multiple sources to support his theories and methods. The examples given in the text are well-thought out, but focus on middle school and high school students. Additionally, the website "Emerging Ed Tech" is designed to be a space where educators can discuss how to integrate technology effectively in their classrooms.

  3. mdxjs.com mdxjs.com
    1. MDX seeks to make writing with Markdown and JSX simpler while being more expressive. Writing is fun again when you combine components, that can even be dynamic or load data, with the simplicity of Markdown for long-form content.
    1. Could I get your intuition for why that rule of thumb applies to svelte components but not Javascript functions? I tend to make heavy use of let x = e when writing normal Javascript, as I do in most other languages (though unlambda is a notable exception). How is svelte different?
    1. (One can already destructure the loop variable but using a store obtained that way currently throws an error - Stores must be declared at the top level of the component (this may change in a future version of Svelte))
    1. This library takes inspiration from Tailwind and utilizes Otion to provide means of efficiently generating atomic styles from shorthand syntax and appending them to the DOM at runtime.
    1. Sometimes, you may be tempted to write that wrapper. Because all your (React or Vue or insert your reactive framework here) instincts tell you so.Resist the temptation. There is a better way. A svelter way. Introducing: the use-directive (a.k.a. “actions”).
    2. However, especially when starting out, it’s very easy to fall into the “this is how I did things in my previous framework” trap.
    3. It can feel like a breeze of fresh summer air.
    1. Note how we have to duplicate the code between these two lifecycle methods in class. This is because in many cases we want to perform the same side effect regardless of whether the component just mounted, or if it has been updated. Conceptually, we want it to happen after every render — but React class components don’t have a method like this. We could extract a separate method but we would still have to call it in two places.
    1. But these lookalike audiences aren’t just potential new customers — they can also be used to exclude unwanted customers in the future, creating a sort of ad targeting demographic blacklist.
    2. How consumers would be expected to navigate this invisible, unofficial credit-scoring process, given that they’re never informed of its existence, remains an open question.
    3. “It sure smells like the prescreening provisions of the FCRA,” Reidenberg told The Intercept. “From a functional point of view, what they’re doing is filtering Facebook users on creditworthiness criteria and potentially escaping the application of the FCRA.”
    4. In an initial conversation with a Facebook spokesperson, they stated that the company does “not provide creditworthiness services, nor is that a feature of Actionable Insights.” When asked if Actionable Insights facilitates the targeting of ads on the basis of creditworthiness, the spokesperson replied, “No, there isn’t an instance where this is used.” It’s difficult to reconcile this claim with the fact that Facebook’s own promotional materials tout how Actionable Insights can enable a company to do exactly this. Asked about this apparent inconsistency between what Facebook tells advertising partners and what it told The Intercept, the company declined to discuss the matter on the record,
    1. YouTube doesn’t give an exact recipe for virality. But in the race to one billion hours, a formula emerged: Outrage equals attention.

      Talk radio has had this formula for years and they've almost had to use it to drive any listenership as people left radio for television and other media.

      I can still remember the different "loudness" level of talk between Bill O'Reilly's primetime show on Fox News and the louder level on his radio show.

    2. A 2015 clip about vaccination from iHealthTube.com, a “natural health” YouTube channel, is one of the videos that now sports a small gray box.

      Does this box appear on the video itself? Apparently not...

      Examples:

      But nothing on the embedded version:

      A screengrab of what this looks like:

    3. When Wojcicki took over, in 2014, YouTube was a third of the way to the goal, she recalled in investor John Doerr’s 2018 book Measure What Matters.“They thought it would break the internet! But it seemed to me that such a clear and measurable objective would energize people, and I cheered them on,” Wojcicki told Doerr. “The billion hours of daily watch time gave our tech people a North Star.” By October, 2016, YouTube hit its goal.

      Obviously they took the easy route. You may need to measure what matters, but getting to that goal by any means necessary or using indefensible shortcuts is the fallacy here. They could have had that North Star, but it's the means they used by which to reach it that were wrong.

      This is another great example of tech ignoring basic ethics to get to a monetary goal. (Another good one is Marc Zuckerberg's "connecting people" mantra when what he should be is "connecting people for good" or "creating positive connections".

    4. The conundrum isn’t just that videos questioning the moon landing or the efficacy of vaccines are on YouTube. The massive “library,” generated by users with little editorial oversight, is bound to have untrue nonsense. Instead, YouTube’s problem is that it allows the nonsense to flourish. And, in some cases, through its powerful artificial intelligence system, it even provides the fuel that lets it spread.#lazy-img-336042387:before{padding-top:66.68334167083543%;}

      This is a great summation of the issue.

    5. Somewhere along the last decade, he added, YouTube prioritized chasing profits over the safety of its users. “We may have been hemorrhaging money,” he said. “But at least dogs riding skateboards never killed anyone.”
    1. A more active stance by librarians, journalists, educators, and others who convey truth-seeking habits is essential.

      In some sense these people can also be viewed as aggregators and curators of sorts. How can their work be aggregated and be used to compete with the poor algorithms of social media?

    1. Meta co-founder and CEO Sam Molyneux writes that “Going forward, our intent is not to profit from Meta’s data and capabilities; instead we aim to ensure they get to those who need them most, across sectors and as quickly as possible, for the benefit of the world.”

      Odd statement from a company that was just acquired by Facebook founder's CVI.

    1. Meanwhile, politicians from the two major political parties have been hammering these companies, albeit for completely different reasons. Some have been complaining about how these platforms have potentially allowed for foreign interference in our elections.3 3. A Conversation with Mark Warner: Russia, Facebook and the Trump Campaign, Radio IQ|WVTF Music (Apr. 6, 2018), https://www.wvtf.org/post/conversation-mark-warner-russia-facebook-and-trump-campaign#stream/0 (statement of Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.): “I first called out Facebook and some of the social media platforms in December of 2016. For the first six months, the companies just kind of blew off these allegations, but these proved to be true; that Russia used their social media platforms with fake accounts to spread false information, they paid for political advertising on their platforms. Facebook says those tactics are no longer allowed—that they've kicked this firm off their site, but I think they've got a lot of explaining to do.”). Others have complained about how they’ve been used to spread disinformation and propaganda.4 4. Nicholas Confessore & Matthew Rosenberg, Facebook Fallout Ruptures Democrats’ Longtime Alliance with Silicon Valley, N.Y. Times (Nov. 17, 2018), https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/17/technology/facebook-democrats-congress.html (referencing statement by Sen. Jon Tester (D-Mont.): “Mr. Tester, the departing chief of the Senate Democrats’ campaign arm, looked at social media companies like Facebook and saw propaganda platforms that could cost his party the 2018 elections, according to two congressional aides. If Russian agents mounted a disinformation campaign like the one that had just helped elect Mr. Trump, he told Mr. Schumer, ‘we will lose every seat.’”). Some have charged that the platforms are just too powerful.5 5. Julia Carrie Wong, #Breaking Up Big Tech: Elizabeth Warren Says Facebook Just Proved Her Point, The Guardian (Mar. 11, 2019), https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/mar/11/elizabeth-warren-facebook-ads-break-up-big-tech (statement of Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.)) (“Curious why I think FB has too much power? Let's start with their ability to shut down a debate over whether FB has too much power. Thanks for restoring my posts. But I want a social media marketplace that isn't dominated by a single censor. #BreakUpBigTech.”). Others have called attention to inappropriate account and content takedowns,6 6. Jessica Guynn, Ted Cruz Threatens to Regulate Facebook, Google and Twitter Over Charges of Anti-Conservative Bias, USA Today (Apr. 10, 2019), https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2019/04/10/ted-cruz-threatens-regulate-facebook-twitter-over-alleged-bias/3423095002/ (statement of Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.)) (“What makes the threat of political censorship so problematic is the lack of transparency, the invisibility, the ability for a handful of giant tech companies to decide if a particular speaker is disfavored.”). while some have argued that the attempts to moderate discriminate against certain political viewpoints.

      Most of these problems can all fall under the subheading of the problems that result when social media platforms algorithmically push or accelerate content on their platforms. An individual with an extreme view can publish a piece of vile or disruptive content and because it's inflammatory the silos promote it which provides even more eyeballs and the acceleration becomes a positive feedback loop. As a result the social silo benefits from engagement for advertising purposes, but the community and the commons are irreparably harmed.

      If this one piece were removed, then the commons would be much healthier, fringe ideas and abuse that are abhorrent to most would be removed, and the broader democratic views of the "masses" (good or bad) would prevail. Without the algorithmic push of fringe ideas, that sort of content would be marginalized in the same way we want our inane content like this morning's coffee or today's lunch marginalized.

      To analogize it, we've provided social media machine guns to the most vile and fringe members of our society and the social platforms are helping them drag the rest of us down.

      If all ideas and content were provided the same linear, non-promotion we would all be much better off, and we wouldn't have the need for as much human curation.

    2. It would allow end users to determine their own tolerances for different types of speech but make it much easier for most people to avoid the most problematic speech, without silencing anyone entirely or having the platforms themselves make the decisions about who is allowed to speak.

      But platforms are making huge decisions about who is allowed to speak. While they're generally allowing everyone to have a voice, they're also very subtly privileging many voices over others. While they're providing space for even the least among us to have a voice, they're making far too many of the worst and most powerful among us logarithmic-ally louder.

      It's not broadly obvious, but their algorithms are plainly handing massive megaphones to people who society broadly thinks shouldn't have a voice at all. These megaphones come in the algorithmic amplification of fringe ideas which accelerate them into the broader public discourse toward the aim of these platforms getting more engagement and therefore more eyeballs for their advertising and surveillance capitalism ends.

      The issue we ought to be looking at is the dynamic range between people and the messages they're able to send through social platforms.

      We could also analogize this to the voting situation in the United States. When we disadvantage the poor, disabled, differently abled, or marginalized people from voting while simultaneously giving the uber-rich outsized influence because of what they're able to buy, we're imposing the same sorts of problems. Social media is just able to do this at an even larger scale and magnify the effects to make their harms more obvious.

      If I follow 5,000 people on social media and one of them is a racist-policy-supporting, white nationalist president, those messages will get drowned out because I can only consume so much content. But when the algorithm consistently pushes that content to the top of my feed and attention, it is only going to accelerate it and create more harm. If I get a linear presentation of the content, then I'd have to actively search that content out for it to cause me that sort of harm.

    1. A spokeswoman for Summit said in an e-mail, “We only use information for educational purposes. There are no exceptions to this.” She added, “Facebook plays no role in the Summit Learning Program and has no access to any student data.”

      As if Facebook needed it. The fact that this statement is made sort of goes to papering over the idea that Summit itself wouldn't necessarily do something as nefarious or worse with it than Facebook might.

    1. With Alphabet Inc.’s Google, and Facebook Inc. and its WhatsApp messaging service used by hundreds of millions of Indians, India is examining methods China has used to protect domestic startups and take control of citizens’ data.

      Governments owning citizens' data directly?? Why not have the government empower citizens to own their own data?

    1. Having low scores posted for all coworkers to see was “very embarrassing,” said Steph Buja, who recently left her job as a server at a Chili’s in Massachusetts. But that’s not the only way customers — perhaps inadvertently — use the tablets to humiliate waitstaff. One diner at Buja’s Chili’s used Ziosk to comment, “our waitress has small boobs.”According to other servers working in Ziosk environments, this isn’t a rare occurrence.

      This is outright sexual harrassment and appears to be actively creating a hostile work environment. I could easily see a class action against large chains and/or against the app maker themselves. Aggregating the data and using it in a smart way is fine, but I suspect no one in the chain is actively thinking about what they're doing, they're just selling an idea down the line.

      The maker of the app should be doing a far better job of filtering this kind of crap out and aggregating the data in a smarter way and providing a better output since the major chains they're selling it to don't seem to be capable of processing and disseminating what they're collecting.

    2. Systems like Ziosk and Presto allow customers to channel frustrations that would otherwise end up on public platforms like Yelp — which can make or break a restaurant — into a closed system that the restaurant controls.

      I like that they're trying to own and control their own data, but it seems like they've relied on a third party company to do most of the thinking for them and they're not actually using the data they're gathering in the proper ways. This is just painfully deplorable.

    1. I literally couldn’t remember when I’d last looked at my RSS subscriptions. On the surface, that might seem like a win: Instead of painstakingly curating my own incoming news, I can effortlessly find an endless supply of interesting, worthwhile content that the algorithm finds for me. The problem, of course, is that the algorithm isn’t neutral: It’s the embodiment of Facebook and Twitter’s technology, data analysis, and most crucial, business model. By relying on the algorithm, instead of on tags and RSS, I’m letting an army of web developers, business strategists, data scientists, and advertisers determine what gets my attention. I’m leaving myself vulnerable to misinformation, and manipulation, and giving up my power of self-determination.
    1. Safiya Noble, Algorithms of Oppression (New York: New York University Press, 2018). See also Mozilla’s 2019 Internet Health Report at https://internethealthreport.org/2019/lets-ask-more-of-ai/.
    1. eight years after release, men are 43% more likely to be taken back under arrest than women; African-Americans are 42% more likely than whites, and high-school dropouts are three times more likely to be rearrested than college graduates.

      but are these possibly the result of external factors (like racism?)

    1. And so The Year of Intentional Internet began.

      After reading just a few posts by Desiree Zamora Garcia, I'd like to nominate her to give a keynote at the upcoming IndieWeb Summit in June. I totally want to hear her give a talk with the title Year of Intentional Internet.

    1. Mr. Duncombe published the results online using CommentPress, open-source software by the Institute for the Future of the Book. Online discussion and commenting is made possible by Social Book, a social-reading platform created by the institute.
    1. Blogs tend towards conversational and quotative reuse, which is great for some subject areas, but not so great for others. Wiki feeds forward into a consensus process that provides a high level of remix and reuse, but at the expense of personal control and the preservation of divergent goals.

      And here it is, the key to the universe!

      We need something that is a meld between the wiki and the blog. Something that will let learners aggregate, ponder, and then synthesize into their own voice. A place where they can create their own goals and directions.

    1. Here’s my pitch for a Dumb Twitter app: The app forces you to tweet at the original 140 character tweet length. You can reply. You can’t like or retweet. You most certainly can’t quote tweet. There is no private DMing. Linear tweet stream only.

      Perhaps he's unaware of it, but this sounds a lot like the design decisions that micro.blog has made in it's platform which is very similar to DoOO, but for the broader public.

    1. academia is built on the premise (IMHO) of getting a good idea, parlaying that into a job and tenure, and waiting for death. I’ve had a lot of colleagues and acquaintances ask why I would bother blogging. Ask why I share all of this content online. Ask why I’m not afraid that someone is going to steal my ideas.

      Though all too true, this is just a painful statement for me. The entirety of our modern world is contingent upon the creation of ideas, their improvement and evolution, and their spreading. In an academic world where attribution of ideas is paramount, why wouldn't one publish quickly and immediately on one's own site (or anywhere else they might for that matter keeping in mind that it's almost trivially easy to self-publish it on one's own website nearly instantaneously)?

      Early areas of science were held back by the need to communicate by handwriting letters as the primary means of communication. Books eventually came, but the research involved and even the printing process could take decades. Now the primary means of science communication is via large (often corporate owned) journals, but even this process may take a year or more of research and then a year or more to publish and get the idea out. Why not write the ideas up and put them out on your own website and collect more immediate collaborators? Funding is already in such a sorry state that generally, even an idea alone, will not get the ball rolling.

      I'm reminded of the gospel song "This little light of mine" whose popular lyrics include: "Hide it under a bushel? No! / I'm gonna let it shine" and "Don't let Satan blow it out, / I'm gonna let it shine"

      I'm starting to worry that academia in conjunction with large corporate publishing interests are acting the role of Satan in the song which could easily be applied to ideas as well as to my little light.


      [also on boffosocko.com]

    1. Boiled down, Medium is sim­ply mar­ket­ing in the ser­vice of more mar­ket­ing. It is not a “place for ideas.” It is a place for ad­ver­tis­ers. It is, there­fore, ut­terly superfluous.
    1. I can't help but wonder what Jonah Goldberg's review of this book will be given his prior effort earlier this year?

      I'm also reminded here of Mark Granovetter's ideas that getting a job is more closely tied to who you know. One's job is often very closely tied to their identity, and even more so when the link that got them their job was through a friend or acquaintance.

    1. The other reason I am writing it, however, is that I know that many of my fellow exvies have, like me, struggled for years to make an open break with their families because of the pressure to conform that comes from inherently abusive fundamentalist socialization.

      Some of this reminds me of the insularity and abusive practices of the Hasidim in the recent documentary One of Us. I think there are more pockets of people living like this than most people admit or we as a society should allow.

      I also think there's a link to Fukuyama's growth of politics here which is highlighted by Jonah Goldberg's Suicide of the West.

    1. By the end of the course, my professor encouraged me to purchase my own domain. Her concern was for authorial control that would signal to readers that my content should be treated according to the media and academic logics where citations and attributions are normative. I used a pre-paid credit card to purchase my domain and the website followed me to graduate school.

      A great story of the beginning of her Domain of One's Own.

    1. However there are going to be lots of scenarios where students are required to use institutional tech. In those cases I still think we need to more willing to delete by default, and not leave the burden on the students. It’s a different mind-set – to purposefully throw away data – but I think it’s becoming a fundamental privacy issue.

      A big piece of the DoOO and IndieWeb philosophies is predicate on the student/teacher/other having their own domain name. Thus, even if they're dependent on institutional technology and/or platforms, they can usually easily export their data, move it to another host and/or platform, and then still have all the URLs live on for as long as they like. If they prefer, they can also have control over whether their content is published to the public, or unpublished/password protected so that only they or those they choose have access to it after-the-fact.

    1. However, although their approaches are different, one thing ASM have in common is their emphasis on network and code pedagogies: that is, trying to help users become coders and technicians, “sociologists of software,” to draw on Simondon (2010), who are far more able to shape ASM to meet their needs. Thus, developers of ASM do more than just make media systems; they teach others how to use them and modify them. As Matt Lee of GNU social argues,it is vitally important to me that anyone can set up a GNU social server on virtually any web hosting. I also want to make it as easy as possible to set up and install. To that end, I will personally help anyone who wants to get set up.
    1. Affective forecasting is the process by which we attempt to pre-dict how we will feel in the future. One of the ways we fail at this task is called the end of history illusion,which suggests that we’re well aware of how much we’ve changed in the past ten years, but we imagine that that’s it—we’re done changing. When asked how much we think we’ll change in the next ten years, we assume we’re done.
    2. The goal of school is for students to learn. What we incentivize, however, is getting good grades.

      Example of moral hazard of gameplay.

    1. Scholars like Annette Gordon-Reed and Woody Holton have given us a deeper understanding of the ways in which leaders like Thomas Jefferson committed to new ideas of freedom even as they continued to be deeply committed to slavery.

      I've not seen any research that relates the Renaissance ideas of the Great Chain of Being moving into this new era of supposed freedom. In some sense I'm seeing the richest elite whites trying to maintain their own place in a larger hierarchy rather than stronger beliefs in equality and hard work.

    1. In the meantime, the classification of viruses remains unclear. Tupanviruses seem to be dependent on their hosts for very little, and other viruses, according to one preprint, even encode ribosomal proteins. “The gap between cellular organisms and viruses is starting to close,” Deeg said.

      Is there a graph of known viruses categoriezed by the machinery that they do or don't have? Can they be classified and sub-classified so that emergent patterns come forward thus allowing us to trace back their ancestry?

    1. Almost every social network of note had an early signature proof of work hurdle. For Facebook it was posting some witty text-based status update. For Instagram, it was posting an interesting square photo. For Vine, an entertaining 6-second video. For Twitter, it was writing an amusing bit of text of 140 characters or fewer. Pinterest? Pinning a compelling photo. You can likely derive the proof of work for other networks like Quora and Reddit and Twitch and so on. Successful social networks don't pose trick questions at the start, it’s usually clear what they want from you.

      And this is likely the reason that the longer form blogs never went out of style in areas of higher education where people are still posting long form content. This "proof of work" is something they ultimately end up using in other areas.

      Jessifer example of three part post written for a journal that was later put back into long form for publication.

    1. In this way they have come to dominate what I call “the division of learning in society”, which is now the central organising principle of the 21st-century social order, just as the division of labour was the key organising principle of society in the industrial age.
    1. Chetty is also using tax data to measure the long-term impacts of dozens of place-based interventions, such as enterprise zones, which use tax and other incentives to draw businesses into economically depressed areas.

      It wasn't this particular piece of text, but roughly at about here I had the thought that these communities could be looked at as life from an input /output perspective in relation to homeostasis. Essentially they're being slowly starved out and killed in a quietly moral yet amoral way. As a result entropy is slowly killing them and also causing problems for the society around them that blames the them for their own problems. Giving them some oxygen to breathe and thrive will fix so many of the problems.

    1. monk’s tomb in 1886

      Apocalypse of Peter was found in the same tomb and manuscript as the Gospel of Peter.