4 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2018
  2. course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com
    1. The time, now, was twenty-three minutes past twelve. The next half hour, at most, would decide the question of whether he would, or would not, get up from his bed, and leave the room.

      He accustoms to describe everything precisely. The narrative of Jennings contains a lot of numbers, such as "twenty-three minutes past twelve","five minutes to twelve","June 24th". He honestly records what happened between June 15th to June 25th. I guess this is her occupational habit.

  3. Mar 2017
    1. I ~hould have preferred to be enveloped by speech, and carried away well beyond all possible beginnings, rather than have to begin it myself. I should have preferred to be-come aware that a nameless voice was already speaking long before me, so that I should only have needed to join in

      This narrative voice is interesting, considering the way he considers the problems of the author/narrator in the previous pages.

  4. Jan 2017
    1. Our moods

      Who is included in "We"? The narrator seems to mean "humans." I like the way this shift to second person plural shifts the reader's focus from a judging mode (of Dodo) to a self-reflective mode, because it builds puts the narrator, reader, and character in the same place. But is it also presumptuous and thus risky to depict this phenomenon as universal? The narrator uses this technique a lot, and it makes me wonder who her "ideal reader" is--who is the reader that the text constructs?

  5. Apr 2016
  6. cervantes.tamu.edu cervantes.tamu.edu
    1. me

      The "implicit narrator," not to be confused with Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, the historical author of the book.