8 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2019
  2. Apr 2019
  3. Oct 2017
    1. importance of data discoverability: an informatics issue that was not considered by WWARN's designers in the initial phase, when it was assumed that access for external users would be limited to the summary data shown on the WWARN Explorer. Discoverability - the ability of potential outside users to find the data set and easily understand what it contains - is critical if the data are to be reused by any investigator with a legitimate research question that may be addressed by data held in the resource. WWARN took care to develop data management tools that included a full audit trail for the variables that they standardised.

      tools and standards again

  4. Dec 2015
    1. The EDUPUB Initiative VitalSource regularly collaborates with independent consultants and industry experts including the National Federation of the Blind (NFB), American Foundation for the Blind (AFB), Tech For All, JISC, Alternative Media Access Center (AMAC), and others. With the help of these experts, VitalSource strives to ensure its platform conforms to applicable accessibility standards including Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Accessibility Guidelines established by the Worldwide Web Consortium known as WCAG 2.0. The state of the platform's conformance with Section 508 at any point in time is made available through publication of Voluntary Product Accessibility Templates (VPATs).  VitalSource continues to support industry standards for accessibility by conducting conformance testing on all Bookshelf platforms – offline on Windows and Macs; online on Windows and Macs using standard browsers (e.g., Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Safari); and on mobile devices for iOS and Android. All Bookshelf platforms are evaluated using industry-leading screen reading programs available for the platform including JAWS and NVDA for Windows, VoiceOver for Mac and iOS, and TalkBack for Android. To ensure a comprehensive reading experience, all Bookshelf platforms have been evaluated using EPUB® and enhanced PDF books.

      Could see a lot of potential for Open Standards, including annotations. What’s not so clear is how they can manage to produce such ePub while maintaining their DRM-focused practice. Heard about LCP (Lightweight Content Protection). But have yet to get a fully-accessible ePub which is also DRMed in such a way.

    1. Among the most useful summaries I have found for Linked Data, generally, and in relationship to libraries, specifically. After first reading it, got to hear of the acronym LODLAM: “Linked Open Data for Libraries, Archives, and Museums”. Been finding uses for this tag, in no small part because it gets people to think about the connections between diverse knowledge-focused institutions, places where knowledge is constructed. Somewhat surprised academia, universities, colleges, institutes, or educational organisations like schools aren’t explicitly tied to those others. In fact, it’s quite remarkable that education tends to drive much development in #OpenData, as opposed to municipal or federal governments, for instance. But it’s still very interesting to think about Libraries and Museums as moving from a focus on (a Web of) documents to a focus on (a Web of) data.

  5. Aug 2015
    1. Shared information

      The “social”, with an embedded emphasis on the data part of knowledge building and a nod to solidarity. Cloud computing does go well with collaboration and spelling out the difference can help lift some confusion.

  6. Jan 2014
    1. Journals and sponsors want you to share your data

      What is the sharing standard? What are the consequences of not sharing? What is the enforcement mechanism?

      There are three primary sharing mechanisms I can think of today: email, usb stick, and dropbox (née ftp).

      The dropbox option is supplanting ftp which comes from another era, but still satisfies an important niche for larger data sets and/or higher-volume or anonymous traffic.

      Dropbox, email and usb are all easily accessible parts of the day-to-day consumer workflow; they are all trivial to set up without institutional support or, importantly, permission.

      An email account is already provisioned by default for everyone or, if the institutional email offerings are not sufficient, a person may easily set up a 3rd-party email account with no permission or hassle.

      Data management alternatives to these three options will have slow or no adoption until the barriers to access and use are as low as email; the cost of entry needs to be no more than *a web browser, an email address, and no special permission required".