60 Matching Annotations
  1. Dec 2023
    1. what you see in a lot of modern politics is this delicate dance between conservatives and 00:24:40 liberals which I think that uh uh for many generations they agreed on the basics their main disagreement was about the pace that both conservatives and 00:24:52 liberals they basically agree we need some rules and also we need the ability to to change the rules but the conservatives prefer a much slower Pace
      • for: quote - social constructs - liberals and conservatives, social norms - liberals and conservatives, insight - social norms

      • in other words

      • insight

        • the tug of war between liberals and conservatives is one of the difference in pace of accepting new social norms
      • adjacency between

        • social norms
        • liberal vs conservative
        • stories
      • adjacency statement
        • When stories are different between different cultural groups, the pace of accepting the new social norm can need quite different due b to the stories being very different
    2. does your scholarship suggest why so many societies do that rather than 00:20:09 saying maybe we start with a Declaration of Human Rights today maybe we write a new one from scratch based on what we know today um because it's very difficult to reach an agreement between a lot of 00:20:21 people and also you know you need to base a a a a real Society is something something extremely complex which you need to base on empirical experience 00:20:34 every time that people try to create a completely new social order just by inventing some Theory it ends very badly you need on yes you do need the ability 00:20:46 to change things a long time but not too quickly and not everything at once so most of the time you have these founding principles and shr find in this 00:20:58 or that text also orally it doesn't have to be written down and at least good societies also have mechanisms to change it but you have to start from some kind 00:21:12 of of of of social consensus and some kind of of social experience if every year we try to invent everything from scratch then Society will just collapse
      • for: insight - creating new social norms is difficult

      • insight

        • creating new social norms is difficult because society is complex
        • society adheres to existing social norms. Adding something new is always a challenge
        • social norms are like the rules of a game. If you change the rules too often, it doesn't work. Society needs stable rules.
      • analogy: changing social norms, sports

        • changing social norms is difficult. Imagine changing the rules off a sports competition each time you play.
    1. https://werd.io/2023/doing-it-all

      Interesting to see what, in generations past, might have been a gendered (female) striving for "having it all" (entailing time with children, family and a career) has crossed over into the masculine space.

      Sounds like Ben's got some basic priorities set, which is really the only thing necessary. Beyond this, every parent, especially of new babies, in the W.E.I.R.D. culture is tired. By this measurement he's doing it "right". What is missing is an interpersonal culture around him of extended family and immediate community of daily interaction to help normalize his conditions. Missing this he's attempting to replace the lack of experience with this area by reaching out to his online community, which may provide a dramatically different and biased sample.

      Some of the "it takes a village" (to raise a child) still operates on many facets, but dramatically missing is the day-to-day direct care and help that many parents need.

      Our capitalistic culture has again, in this case of parenting in the W.E.I.R.D. world, managed to privatize the profits and socialize the losses. Here the losses in Ben's case are on his physical well-being (tiredness) and his mental state wondering if his case is "normal". A further loss is the erosion of his desire for a family unit and cohesion of community which the system is attempting to sever by playing on his desire to "have it all". Giving in to the pull of work at the expense of family only drives the system closer to collapse.

  2. Nov 2023
    1. What do change over time "are the particular rituals and customs and expectations and rules pertaining to trust in society," she adds. "As those norms are shifting, as they did quite massively in the 19th century, you have the perfect conditions for exploiting the gaps between new and old. That shift to modernity was often the very script of the con."

      Many confidence games rely on information imbalance in the gaps between old and new ways of doing things.

      This was certainly true in the 19 C. as well as with technology changes in the 20th and 21st C.

  3. Oct 2023
    1. In recent years, scholars have called for policymakersworking on the environment and other large-scalecollective-action problems to harness social norms andsocial tipping dynamics to “stabilize the earth’s climate”
      • adjacency
        • between
          • policymakers
          • social norms
          • social tipping dynamics
      • adjacency statement
        • researchers have advocated that policymakers should direct their attention to social norms and social tipping dynamics to accelerate adoption of policies to stabilize the earth's climate.
    2. caling Up Change: A Critical Reviewand Practical Guide to HarnessingSocial Norms for Climate Action
      • for: social tipping points - climate action, climate action - social tipping points, social norms - climate action, climate action - social norms, Damon Centola

      • title: Scaling Up Change: A Critical Review and Practical Guide to Harnessing Social Norms for Climate Action

      • author:
        • Sara M. Constantino
        • Gregg Sparkman
        • Gordon T. Kraft-Todd
        • Cristina Bicchieri
        • Damon Centola
        • Bettina Shell-Duncan
        • Sonja Vogt
        • Elke U. Weber
      • date: 2022
  4. Sep 2023
    1. To build HIPAA compliant software, developers need to be aware of and comply with several key requirements outlined in the HIPAA Privacy Rule and Security Rule. These requirements are designed to ensure the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of protected health information (PHI) and to prevent unauthorized access, use, or disclosure of PHI.

      Building software compliant with HIPAA standards necessitates a deep understanding of its Privacy and Security Rules to safeguard protected health information effectively.

  5. Aug 2023
      • for: fossil capitalism, progress trap, intersectionality, social norms, social norms - waste, externalization, capitalism
      • title

        • Waves of Abandonment
          • The Permian Basin is ground zero for a billion-dollar surge of zombie oil wells
      • summary

        • a story that illustrates the intersectionality of fossil capitalism
          • progress trap
          • exploitation
          • tragedy of the commons
          • fossil fuel industry
          • gold rush
          • externalization
          • fossil capitalism
      • Comment

        • Yet another example of capitalism's tendency to externalize manifests at the most basic level.
        • The tendency to treat nature as an inexhaustable garbage dumping ground seems to be built into our culture's economic norms taught to us by most parents and society at large.
        • There are not enough parents that teach their children to love, respect and feel that they are an intrinsic part of nature.
        • The externalization our society teaches us in the form of destructive, widely-accepted social norms of waste such as::
          • having the concept of waste and garbage
          • garbage taken out once a week
          • waste bins everywhere
          • keep our backyard clean, but at the expense of trucking out our garbage to some unknown place
        • has been enculturated into us from early age
    1. Can policy promote beneficial norm change? The model suggests that effective interventions lower the tipping threshold.
      • for: social tipping point, STP, TPF, social norms, complex contagion, lowering threshold
      • policy changes can lower tipping point thresholds
    2. Two factors consistently helped hasten beneficial change in our study.
      • for: social tipping point, STP, tipping point, social norm, complex contagion
      • study findings
        • Two factors can help hasten beneficial change
          • common understanding of the benefits from change due to:
            • events that attract attention
            • opinion polls that aggregate information
            • finding an angle on an issue that appeals to a broad demographics
          • perserverence
            • leaders who persevere even at great cost
  6. Dec 2022
    1. I'd love it to be normal and everyday to not assume that when you post a message on your social network, every person is reading it in a similar UI, either to the one you posted from, or to the one everyone else is reading it in.

      🤗

    1. https://shkspr.mobi/blog/2022/12/the-ethics-of-syndicating-comments-using-webmentions/

      Not an answer to the dilemma, though I generally take the position of keeping everything unless someone asks me to take it down or that I might know that it's been otherwise deleted. Often I choose not to delete my copy, but simply make it private and only viewable to me.

      On the deadnaming and related issues, it would be interesting to create a webmention mechanism for the h-card portions so that users might update these across networks. To some extent Automattic's Gravatar system does this in a centralized manner, but it would be interesting to see it separately. Certainly not as big an issue as deadnaming, but there's a similar problem on some platforms like Twitter where people will change their display name regularly for either holidays, or lately because they're indicating they'd rather be found on Mastodon or other websites.

      The webmention spec does contain details for both editing/deleting content and resending webmentions to edit and/or remove the original. Ideally this would be more broadly adopted and used in the future to eliminate the need for making these choices by leaving the choice up to the original publisher.

      Beyond this, often on platforms that don't have character limits (Reddit for example), I'll post at the bottom of my syndicated copy of content that it was originally published on my site (along with the permalink) and explicitly state that I aggregate the replies from various locations which also helps to let people know that they might find addition context or conversation at the original post should they be interested. Doing this on Twitter, Mastodon, et al is much harder due to space requirements obviously.

      While most responses I send would fall under fair use for copying, I also have a Creative Commons license on my text in an effort to help others feel more comfortable with having copies of my content on their sites.

      Another ethical layer to this is interactions between sites which both have webmentions enabled. To some extent this creates an implicit bi-directional relationship which says, I'm aware that this sort of communication exists and approve of your parsing and displaying my responses.

      The public norms and ethics in this area will undoubtedly evolve over time, so it's also worth revisiting and re-evaluating the issue over time.

  7. Nov 2022
  8. Sep 2022
    1. The most recent 300 out of 300,000 years have been abnormal in the sense that a fever of 107 degrees Fahrenheit is abnormal when, for most of a person's life, her temperature has been at about 98.6 degrees. Until 10,000 years or so ago, the normal lifestyle for Homo sapiens was living in small groups (Schmidt and Zimmermann 2019), hunting and gathering. Humanity's fever started about ten millennia in our past and rapidly led to a highly febrile system of giant groups, which have increasingly industrialized. Humanity grew from scattered groups of 20 to cities of 20 million, from normal to abnormal, in an evolutionary instant.

      !- for : explanation of normality - the less historical knowledge we have and trust, the more our current social context will appear as normal - what many may consider normal when the historical horizon is just our lifetime or even all of modernity, may be considered abnormal considered from a longer paleontological timescale

    1. “That’s the mantra of web3, to be open and composable, and with CC0 no one owns the rights to the intellectual property. This creates huge potential for what can be created in the future. But the bigger corporations are coming into the space and trying to close things down, tracking wallets and essentially bringing web2 into web3. I don’t want that. I want web3 to continue to be built by the people, for the people, which is why all these public goods are crucial for the future of web3.”

      This is extremely interesting: the conviction that public domain approach is what differentiates web3 from web2. Quite different from a. typical spin that attributes this to the technological stack - here the stack is law + norms.

  9. Apr 2022
    1. Humans’ tendency to“overimitate”—to reproduce even the gratuitous elements of another’s behavior—may operate on a copy now, understand later basis. After all, there might begood reasons for such steps that the novice does not yet grasp, especially sinceso many human tools and practices are “cognitively opaque”: not self-explanatory on their face. Even if there doesn’t turn out to be a functionalrationale for the actions taken, imitating the customs of one’s culture is a smartmove for a highly social species like our own.

      Research has shown that humans are "high-fidelity" imitators to the point of overimitation. It's possible that as an evolved and highly social species that imitation signals acceptance and participation by members of the society such that even "cognitively opaque" practices will be blindly followed.

      link to: https://hypothes.is/a/lROFtsDkEey_yHtNNJ_NfQ

  10. Jan 2022
  11. Dec 2021
    1. Let’s consider a fairly random example of one of these generalistaccounts, Francis Fukuyama’s The Origins of Political Order: FromPrehuman Times to the French Revolution (2011). Here isFukuyama on what he feels can be taken as received wisdom aboutearly human societies: ‘In its early stages human politicalorganization is similar to the band-level society observed in higherprimates like chimpanzees,’ which Fukuyama suggests can beregarded as ‘a default form of social organization’.

      The answer to my earlier question: They are taking Fukuyama and others to task here.

      One should note that even among our primate cousins, there are a variety of social structures and social norms beyond only the chimpanzees. Folks forget about the differing structures of animals like bonobos which show much different structures.

  12. Nov 2021
    1. Lily Hajdú-Gimes, a celebrated Hungarian psychoanalyst of that era, diagnosed the trauma of forced conformity in patients, as well as in herself. “I play the game that is offered by the regime,” she told friends, “though as soon as you accept that rule you are in a trap.”
    2. Right here in America, right now, it is possible to meet people who have lost everything—jobs, money, friends, colleagues—after violating no laws, and sometimes no workplace rules either. Instead, they have broken (or are accused of having broken) social codes having to do with race, sex, personal behavior, or even acceptable humor, which may not have existed five years ago or maybe five months ago. Some have made egregious errors of judgment. Some have done nothing at all. It is not always easy to tell.
  13. Sep 2021
  14. Aug 2021
    1. To avoid that divide in community discussions, we recommend having participants collectively establish discussion norms each time.

      This is an interesting point I've been wrestling with.

  15. Jul 2021
  16. Mar 2021
  17. Feb 2021
  18. Nov 2020
  19. Oct 2020
    1. As society scales up, gossip becomes ineffective. Rumors don’t spread easily from village to village, so I can get away with violating norms when I venture out and deal with strangers.

      Gossip doesn't scale, mostly because rumors don't spread from village to village. As a result you can get away with violating norms when you deal with strangers.

    2. To escape from the chaos, we will need new norms of behavior that incline us away from gossip.

      To balance out this gossip-driven world, Arnold Kling argues we need new norms of behavior (I would argue perhaps we need new mechanisms), to incline us away from gossip.

    3. As a social enforcement mechanism, gossip does not scale.

      Gossip does not scale to larger groups as an enforcement mechanism for social norms.

  20. Sep 2020
    1. We are severely disabled and completely normal

      I appreciated this sentence because it is very anti-ableism. Ableism is a construct that enforces this idea that if your body doesn't function properly there must be something wrong with you when in reality everyone's bodies work differently. Understanding that should be the norm.

  21. Jul 2020
  22. Jun 2020
  23. May 2020
  24. Apr 2020
    1. Networks  of civic engagement increase the potential cost to defectors who risk  benefits from future transactiaction. The same networks foster norms of  reciprocity that are reinforced by the networks of relationships in  which reputation is both balued and discussed. The same social networks  facilitate the flow of reputational information.

      How can we build some of this into social media networks to increase the level of trust and facts?

    2. Norms that  support social trust evolve because they lower transaction costs and  facilitate cooperation, conferring benefits upon cooperators.
  25. Jul 2019
  26. May 2019
    1. it's the little details that make the big things come about.

      If excellence is your aim, such details--and they are countless in education--must be addressed in a thoughtful, systemic way.

  27. Jul 2018
    1. The Commons Short and Sweet

      This resource is very helpful in explaining, in simple and short word paragraphs (short and sweet, it is), the full context of the commons:

      "The commons is not a resource. It is a resource plus a defined community and the protocols, values and norms devised by the community to manage its resources. Many resources urgently need to be managed as commons, such as the atmosphere, oceans, genetic knowledge and biodiversity."

      Emphasizing the social norms and community accountability aspects of the commons are key to truly understanding the commons, it's role in society, and how it can be sustained. 

  28. Sep 2017
    1. look at the edges, the connections between the nodes.

      This is what we mean with the term 'sociological imagination'. Theory allows us to 'see' below the surface of society and to understand the invisible network of norms, values, structures, institutions and systems of inequality that shape individual choice and behavior. In this way, SNA should be fundamental to sociological methods.

    1. who we associate with, and understanding the impact of those relationships increases

      This is fundamental to sociology as a discipline. We call it peer pressure, social support, social capital, norms, etc. This is why many who use SNA see it as the best methodology for doing sociology.

  29. Feb 2017
    1. In chil-dren, the rudiments of taste discover themselves very early in a thousand instances; in lheir fond· ness for regular bodies, their admiration of pic-tures and statues,

      To what extent do the earliest introductions to norms play into these "rudiments of taste"?

  30. Jan 2017
    1. man in a fever would not ""-~3 insist on his palate as able to decide concerning -.+,. fl~vours

      A very crucial point here: judgment and discernment are themselves relational and contextual.

      That said, we would be wise to keep in mind the Lemos piece on norms and normalcy (as it bears upon bodies) as we read the rest of this paragraph.

    1. An anomaly is thus a mere difference in degree for which the norm will serve as metric.

      Normal is a powerful, potent, and potentially pernicious black box. And it is frequently a black box deployed against rhetoric.

    2. Norms, have long inhabited the architect’s toolset

      I want to highlight the useful understanding of norms as tools: this very quickly begins to unpack the black box that is normal. Lemos turns norms" into Morty's car battery*.

  31. Dec 2015
    1. a sophisticated creation thatseems to simultaneously extend but also threaten our understanding of what it means tobe human.

      So if it threatens our understanding of what it means to be human.. is that beneficial to our ongoing research of essentially what makes us humans by constantly pushing our understanding to be deeper? or is harmful and uprooting of the interpersonal/cultural norms we've established?