14 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2019
    1. Escobar casts wide the net of his critique, his objective is not merely to tackle neoliberal capitalism, rampant individualism, patriarchy or colonialism — although each of those topics are explored in detail. He is writing against nothing less than all of modernity, a “particular modelo civilizatorio, or civilizational model… an entire way of life and a whole style of world making.” Our toxic, modern lifestyle in the Global North and the way it understands (or fails to understand) the relationality between humanity and other forms of life plays the dominant role in creating the contemporary crises. To preserve the future we need a different way of life and way to relate to all of life, “no less than a new notion of the human.” The crises are inseparable from our social lives. We need to step outside of our established worldviews to bring about significant transformations. Is this possible? How can we achieve such a transition?

      Designs for the Pluriverse book review

    1. since the convents where some had been educated had been disbamlcd long ago by Henry Vlll,

      I feel like this shows us definitively that "Protestant Nunnery" was a positive thing which filled a gap that was left when Henry VIII told the pope to get lost and subsequently all the convents sort of fell apart

  2. Sep 2018
    1. In 2007, the pharmaceutical company Bayer gave up on a male contraceptive “that involved an annual implant and a quarterly injection,” as my colleague Olga Khazan reported in 2015. The company, she wrote, “concluded that men would consider the regimen—in the words of a spokesperson—‘not as convenient as a woman taking a pill once a day.’”

      I AM FROTHING AT THE MOUTH I AM SO ANGRY

    2. College enrollment has historically been higher among women who have access to the pill, and “birth control has been estimated to account for more than 30 percent of the increase in the proportion of women in skilled careers from 1970 to 1990,” the report reads.

      But how has their academic performance been [negatively] impacted by bad side effects?

    3. he might have mood swings.

      Greater aggression? --> more frequent violence toward women?

    4. most men wanted to continue using the injectable birth control—more than 80 percent of them said they would choose to use it.*

      THIS IS MADDENING

    5. 38 percent had an increased libido, and 23 percent felt pain at the injection site.

      How are these so comparatively bad?

    6. “It was believed women would tolerate side effects better than men, who demanded a better quality of life,”

      THIS IS SO INCREDIBLY FUCKED UP.

  3. Oct 2017
    1. The American and the girl with him

      In establishing the setting, we are now introduced to the two main characters: The American and the girl.

      For the author chooses to deliberately separate the two characters with their respective specificity, referring to the male character as "The American" and the female as "the girl". The male character being bestowed a title of nationality, and the girl existing as a relatively unknown figure, Hemingway shows us that the male figure exists in a more concrete manner. In meaning, he exists with more identity and thus is of more importance. "and the girl with him" establishes that the girl is a companion to The American, suggesting that the leader in this couple is the male character. Perhaps the author may be suggesting to the reader an influence of patriarchy.

  4. Sep 2017
    1. feminist critics tended to work within a liberal framework for evaluating individual agency as the pursuit of freedom

      Interesting point. Is Charlotte's decision considered "individual agency," or a casualty of the patriarchy?

    2. The agency of the critic is exemplified in discovering and naming the overlooked agency of Austen’s female subjects, who in themselves demonstrate Austen’s attentiveness to the limits of patriarchal norms and her willingness to transgress.

      Again, Moe is using secondary sources to accentuate that Austen writes about women constrained by patriarchy. Here, however, she includes the concept of "Agency" (for both critic and character), which connects to her argument about Charlotte's actions.

    3. Austen exposed the patriarchal conditions of her historical moment and the way romantic conventions coded for power and wealth, while simultaneously using the constraints of her provincial and domestic settings to her advantage, demonstrating the duplicitous aptitude of romantic narratives to make those conditions visible

      Important point. By evaluating Austen's patriarchal setting and consequential ability to write about women during this constrained period, Moe extrapolates upon Austen's achievements as a writer, further subverting Lewes' critique. Thus, she denounces the past reading of Austen to promote her own, modern and feminist, reading.

    4. Yet, Charlotte’s stance is important to think through two hundred years later as a reminder of the multiplicity of attitudes toward intimacy, conjugality, and self-fulfillment in Austen’s fiction. This multiplicity remains unstudied by a tradition of Austen criticism that too often remains bound, even in contemporary feminist forms, to the analytic and prescriptive parameters of liberal personhood as those are under-stood to have emerged at the end of the eighteenth century.

      Moe points out that many Austen critics do not view Charlotte's decisions regarding marriage as "modern," yet as a victim of the 18th century patriarchy, Charlotte's actions make a lot of sense.

  5. Feb 2017
    1. The elder, reg-ular in her features, and majestic both in shape and mien, is admirably filled for commanding es-teem, and even a religious veneration: the younger, careless, blooming, sprightly, is entirely formed for captivating the heart, and engaging love.

      Unnecessary analogy that reinforces patriarchy. Oh and the whole numbered categories thing.