26 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2021
  2. Sep 2021
  3. May 2021
  4. Apr 2021
    1. Once plant toxins are absorbed fr om the gut into the blood, they are often trans- ported to the liver. T he liver primarily, and secondarily the kidney, intestinal mucosa, lungs, a nd skin contain enzyme systems that metabolize or alter toxic compounds, rendering them inert. Ability to metabolize or reduce sensitivity to specific phytotoxins varies by herbivore species a nd individuals. For example, sheep can tolerate and detoxify more pyrrolizidine alkaloids than cattle, therefore it takes five times more tall larkspur (Delphinium occidentalis) to poison sheep compared to cattle
    1. Successfully navigating the seasonal and spatial variation of forage quality in grazing environments can be accomplished by knowing how much to eat, when to eat, and what else to eat. Grazing animals have a strong natural tendency to select diets composedof several plant species and sample available plants on a regular basis. This behavior may increase the likelihood of ingesting necessary nutrients and reduce the potential of over-ingesting toxins. The toxic effects of a plant are determined largely bythe amount eaten, but the ingestion rate may also be important. Grazing animals can avoid toxicosis by limiting their consumption of a specific toxic plant each day to allow sufficient time for detoxification, and to limit potential cumulative effects ofspecifictoxins
  5. Mar 2021
    1. Manipulate how? Primarily to spend your hard earned pennies on shit you don't need. Secondly to force you to think and act like they want you to. And it's working! Kind, loving, good people have turned into these hateful monstrocities.

      i agree that in some cases people on social media have been radicalized, have become terrible. but i do not blame the platform, and don't think there's anything inherently rotten about them.

      almost sorry to say it, but i think big social is kind of ok? mostly it's pretty harmless. use protection, some tracking blocking software. but a lot of people have very fine, very enjoyable or very ok experiences, connecting reasonably in many cases primarily or mostly with people they know. big social has been incredibly valuable at connecting us.

      its not "all toxic as fuck." i think there is good & good uses we have to acknowledge. focusing only on the bad of things delegitimizes the things we have to say. i believe strongly that we're missing a lot of good, but overall, i think the bad being done is fairly mild, that toxic-leaning people are going to mis-use and abuse most systems, that the personal-data is often significantly oversold & overrated. i have a lot of technical hopes for what i hope & think might be on the frontiers, what we might do, and i want to replace big social. let the good compel us. let's think of what we want. let's not fall to despair. resist radicalizing yourself but immerse yourself in practice, in trying things, in understanding connecting with people.

  6. Dec 2020
    1. “This isn’t him going to grab a beer with guys. He’s going to find psychological and emotional support from men who understand his problems,” Liz explains. “They’re not just getting together to have a bitch fest, gossip, or complain about their lives. They’re super intentional about what they’re talking about, why, and what’s important to them.”

      Hamlett discusses the psychological costs men being isolated (toxic masculinity/macho culture) has caused on society, especially women. She also explores the idea of support groups for men, highlighted in this passage.

  7. Sep 2020
    1. the gender divide in computer culture than the recent events at Google to see the crisis in gender equity in Silicon Valley and beyond

      Lire à ce sujet, entre autres : Emily Chang, Brotopia: Breaking Up the Boys' Club of Silicon Valley, New York, Penguin, 2018.

    2. had triggered protectionist, elitist, and chauvinistic reactions from Reddi-tors far beyond India, offering glimpses of toxic geek masculinity

      Le harcèlement est commun dans le milieu du jeu vidéo, que ce soit dans les communautés de joueurs en ligne ou dans les entreprises elles-mêmes. Voir, par exemple : Erwan Cario et Marius Chapuis, « Récits de harcèlement et d'agressions sexuelles à Ubisoft : "Les jeux vidéos c'est fun, on peut tout faire, rien n'est grave" », Libération, 1er juillet 2020.

  8. May 2019
    1. in February, 1977, Searle's law firm, Sidley & Austin, offered Skinner a job, which he accepted, recusing himself from the case

      The company being sued for the cover up of the negative side effects of aspartame hires the lawyer that represented the FDA thus resulting in the case never making it to trial.

    2. n January 1977, formally requested that a grand jury be convened to investigate whether indictments should be filed against Searle for knowingly misrepresenting findings and "concealing material facts and making false statements" in aspartame safety tests (the first time in the FDA's history that they request a criminal investigation of a manufacturer)

      Aspartame was so poorly misrepresented in the scientific research provided for its approval that it became the first case in history in which a lawsuit was brought against the manufacturer for concealing of material facts and false statements.

    1. elevated cortisol and gut dysbiosis via interactions with different biogenic amine may also have additional impact to modulate neuronal signaling lead to neurobiological impairments

      In summary aspartame increases the fire of neurotransmitters, increases heart rate and and blood pressure, and imbalances gut bacteria.

    2. aspartame metabolite; mainly Phy and its interaction with neurotransmitter and aspartic acid by acting as excitatory neurotransmitter causes this pattern of impairments

      Aspartame alters the chemical composition of the brain and excites neurotransmitters.

    1. examination showed fetal capillaries with condensed nuclei of endothelial cells, cytotrophoblasts with condensed fragmented nuclei and vacuolated cytoplasm, and syncytiotrophoblasts with irregular condensed fragmented nuclei

      In summary aspartame results in the death of cells that carry nutrients and energy to the growing embryo.

    2. Damage in the placenta was detected in the form of rupture of the interhemal membrane, lysis of glycogen trophoblast cells, spongiotrophoblast cells with vacuolated cytoplasm and darkly stained nuclei.

      Aspartame caused placenta cells to rupture and behave like they had been exposed to a pathogen or virus.

    1. Results reveal that the aspartame molecule is inherently amyloidogenic, and the self-assembly of aspartame becomes a toxic trap for proteins and cells

      Aspartame inhibits the function of organs and tissues via clusters of proteins/“plaque”.

    2. Aspartame fibrils were also found to induce hemolysis, causing DNA damage resulting in both apoptosis and necrosis-mediated cell death.

      This study found that aspartame causes DNA damage and cell death.

  9. Feb 2019
    1. Escobar casts wide the net of his critique, his objective is not merely to tackle neoliberal capitalism, rampant individualism, patriarchy or colonialism — although each of those topics are explored in detail. He is writing against nothing less than all of modernity, a “particular modelo civilizatorio, or civilizational model… an entire way of life and a whole style of world making.” Our toxic, modern lifestyle in the Global North and the way it understands (or fails to understand) the relationality between humanity and other forms of life plays the dominant role in creating the contemporary crises. To preserve the future we need a different way of life and way to relate to all of life, “no less than a new notion of the human.” The crises are inseparable from our social lives. We need to step outside of our established worldviews to bring about significant transformations. Is this possible? How can we achieve such a transition?

      Designs for the Pluriverse book review

  10. Aug 2018
    1. In this consumerist-led version of proletarianization, which is very per-tinent to what is happening with the commodification of higher educa-tion, the argument is that ‘consumers are “discharged” of the burden as well as the responsibility of shaping their own lives and are reduced to units of buying power controlled by marketing techniques’ (p. 34). For example, in rating and ranking scales and league tables, marketing agencies have essentially appropriated the decision-making process from students and their parents. Today’s ‘cognitive capitalism’, Lemmens says, is producing the ‘systematic destruction of knowledge and the knowing subject’ (p. 34), in what Stiegler calls the ‘systematic industri-alization of human memory and cognition’ (p. 34). As Stiegler (2010b) cryptically puts it, what is at stake is ‘the battle for intelligence’ (p. 35) which had its most recent genesis in the ‘psychopathologies and addic-tive ‘behavior patterns’ (Lemmens 2011, p. 34) brought about by the ‘logic of the market’ ushered in by Thatcher and supported by Reagan. This unleashed ‘a cultural and spiritual regression of unprecedented magnitude, transforming the whole of society into a machine for profit maximization and creating a state of “system carelessness” and “systemic stupidity” on a global scale’ (p. 34). It is literally ‘a global struggle for the mind’ in a context where there is an erasure of ‘consciousness and sociality’ (p. 35)

      Draws on labour process theory and the work of Stiegler to conceptualise the de-professionalisation of academic workers and their proletarianisation. This relates to the arguments about how economic rationales have colonised all areas of social life.

      This seems to mirror similar arguments put forward by Nikolas Rose and Michel Dean and other post-structuralists such as drawing on Foucault's governmentality

    2. Far from ‘competition’ supposedly driving ‘innovation’, Connell (2013) argues that it does the reverse. In the first instance, what a neo-liberal conception of the university produces, is the ‘reproduction of global dependency’ (p. 2)—through a ‘neocolonial dependence...built into performativity through international rankings of journals, depart-ment and universities’, whereby local intellectual cultures are under-mined and obliterated through an unhealthy reliance on ‘impact factors and ‘citations’ (p. 2). Secondly, the ‘entrenchment of social hierarchies in knowledge production and circulation’ (p. 2), act to further sediment privilege in the already advantaged—institutionally, in Australia in the older so-called ‘sandstone’ universities, and individually in the scions of the privileged who attend them.

      The neocolonial nature of the research performativity regime and its epistemological dominance.

    3. rgues that the very fibre of democracy which we understand to be ‘individual and collective self-rule’ and which we take to be ‘a perma-nent achievement of the West’ and that cannot be ‘lost’, is in the process of being completely ‘overwhelmed and ... displaced by the economium to enhance capital value, competitive positioning, and credit ratings’ (p. 10)

      Is this a problematic argument? The collapsing of the ideas of democracy and liberty into the category of the ´West´.

    4. Transformed in this process is the very nature of knowledge:Neoliberalization replaces education aimed at deepening and broadening intelligence and sensibilities, developing historical consciousness and her-meneutic adroitness, acquiring diverse knowledge and literacies, becom-ing theoretically capacious and politically and socially perspicacious, with [forms of] education aimed at honing technically-skilled entrepreneurial actors adept at gaming any system. (p. 123)

      neoliberalism and the transformation of knowledge and knowledge work

    5. By way of explaining why there is so much internal unrest and dissention in universities, Boyer (2011) says that the ‘dominant critical narrative’ emerges from the ‘dissipat[ion of] organizational and collegial auton-omy in order to better saturate universities with market-oriented prin-ciples (knowledge as commodity, faculty as wage labour, administration as management, student body as consumer public, university as market-place)’ (pp. 179–180).The loudest opposition to this intensified neoliberal regime has come from ‘faculty’ who, ‘among the three estates of the university (students, faculty, administrators)...has experienced the deepest erosion of auton-omy under the current reforms’ (Boyer 2011, p. 180). Coupled with this is the view that students stand to ‘enhance their social power with their new image as sovereign consumers, and the re-imagination of the uni-versity as a kind of for-profit corporation run by profit-minded managers has helped to cement the political hegemony of administrators’ (Boyer 2011, p. 180).

      Boyer's argument is that faculty feel neoliberalism more intensely than administration of students because it is felt as a direct assault on autonomy. c.f Nixon and Walker on the issue of autonomy and academic freedom as sectional interest in tension with a wider agenda for freedoms.

    6. In other words, neoliberalism works through the way in which it ‘dissemi-nates market values and metrics to every sphere of life and construes the human itself exclusively as homo oeconomicus’ (Brown 2015, p. 176). Brown (2015)

      a definition of the way neoliberalism as ideology, governance and economic ordering frames all life in market terms

  11. Jul 2018
    1. (DNEL) 3.4 mg/kg bw/day neurotoxicity

      As a child you should not swallow more than 130 mg of Aluminium chloride hydroxide sulphate per day.