43 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2019
    1. Educational development is often embedded in a highly variable campus ecosystem where other units or individuals may take on some of these roles.

      role of CTLs is highly dependent upon the campus

  2. Mar 2019
    1. Nine alternatives to lecturing This page briefly describes nine ways to teach other than lecture. Some of these are common, such as case study; others, such as a pro and con grid, are explained less often. This page, like the others I have bookmarked, is oriented toward teaching college students and adults.

  3. Dec 2018
    1. nail-adorned jewels she gave to the heroes:

      She is well-respected within the mead hall and in return respects the men of the hall

    2. ’Mid hall-building holders. The highly-famed queen, 55 Peace-tie of peoples, oft passed through the building, Cheered the young troopers; she oft tendered a hero A beautiful ring-band, ere she went to her sitting

      Wealhtheow portrays the role of a traditional Anglo-Saxon woman at the time. Wealhtheow is first introduced to the audience, she immediately falls into her role as peaceful greeter and cocktail waitress. The author then reinforces that she is a member of the weaker gender by directing Wealhtheow to her proper position behind the king. When the queen is not serving drinks or greeting the hall guests, she may usually be found obediently following Hrothgar throughout the mead hall and "waiting for hope-news".

  4. Nov 2018
    1. One of the most striking features of the quantitative and qualitative data from first- and second-semester German students is that the students interact directly with each other, as opposed to interacting mainly with the teacher. The changed role of teacher and students

    1. Hospitalists need to continue to take C-suite positions at hospitals and policy roles at think tanks and governmental agencies. They need to continue to master technology, clinical care, and the ever-growing importance of where those two intersect. Most of all, the field can’t get lazy. Otherwise, the “better mousetrap” of HM might one day be replaced by the next group of physicians willing to work harder to implement their great idea. “If we continue to be the vanguard of innovation, the vanguard of making the system work better than it ever has before,” Dr. Wachter says, “the field that creates new models of care, that integrates technology in new ways, and that has this can-do attitude and optimism, then the sky is the limit.”
    2. At a time of once-in-a-generation reform to healthcare in this country, the leaders of HM can’t afford to rest on their laurels, says Dr. Goldman. Three years ago, he wrote a paper for the Journal of Hospital Medicine titled “An Intellectual Agenda for Hospitalists.” In short, Dr. Goldman would like to see hospitalists move more into advancing science themselves rather than implementing the scientific discoveries of others. He cautions anyone against taking that as criticism of the field. “If hospitalists are going to be the people who implement what other people have found, they run the risk of being the ones who make sure everybody gets perioperative beta-blockers even if they don’t really work,” he says. “If you want to take it to the illogical extreme, you could have people who were experts in how most efficiently to do bloodletting. “The future for hospitalists, if they’re going to get to the next level—I think they can and will—is that they have to be in the discovery zone as well as the implementation zone.” Dr. Wachter says it’s about staying ahead of the curve. For 20 years, the field has been on the cutting edge of how hospitals treat patients. To grow even more, it will be crucial to keep that focus.

      Hospitalists can learn these skills through residency and fellowship training. In addition, through mentorship models that create evergrowing

    3. So what now? For all the talk of SHM’s success, HM’s positive impacts, and the specialty’s rocket growth trajectory, the work isn’t done, industry leaders say. Hospitalists are not just working toward a more valuable delivery of care, they’re also increasingly viewed as leaders of projects all around the hospital because, well, they are always there, according to Dr. Gandhi. “Hospitalists really are a leader in the hospital around quality and safety issues because they are there on the wards all the time,” she says. “They really have an interest in being the physician champions around various initiatives, so [in my hospital tenures] I partnered with many of my hospitalist colleagues on ways to improve care, such as test-result management, medication reconciliation, and similar efforts. We often would establish multidisciplinary committees to work on things, and almost always there was a hospitalist who was chairing or co-chairing or participating very actively in that group.”
    4. “If we can’t build what I think of as a pyramid of care with one doctor and many, many other people supporting a broad group of patients, I don’t think we’re going to be able to find the scale to take care of the aging population that’s coming at us,” she says. Caring for patients once they are discharged means including home nurses, pharmacists, physical therapists, dietitians, hired caregivers, and others in the process, Dr. Gorman says. But that doesn’t mean overburdening the wrong people with the wrong tasks. The same way no one would think to allow a social worker to prescribe medication is the same way that a hospitalist shouldn’t be the one checking up on a patient to make sure there is food in that person’s fridge. And while the hospitalist can work in concert with others and run many things from the hospital, maybe hospital-based physicians aren’t always the best physicians for the task. “There are certain things that only the doctor can do, of course, but there are a lot more things that somebody else can do,” Dr. Gorman says, adding, “some of the times, you’re going to need the physician, it’s going to be escalated to a medication change, but sometimes maybe you need to escalate to a dietary visit or you need to escalate to three physical therapy visits. “The nitty-gritty of taking care of people outside of the hospital is so complex and problematic, and most of the solutions are not really medical, but you need the medical part of the dynamic. So rather [than a hospitalist running cases], it’s a super-talented social worker, nurse, or physical therapist. I don’t know, but somebody who can make sure that all of that works and it’s a process that can be leveraged.” Whoever it is, the gravitation beyond the walls of the hospital has been tied to a growing sea change in how healthcare will compensate providers. Medicare has been migrating from fee-for-service to payments based on the totality of care for decades. The names change, of course. In the early 1980s, it was an “inpatient prospective payment system.”
    5. Dr. Bessler says that as HMGs continued to focus on improving quality and lowering costs, they had little choice but to get involved in activities outside the hospital. “We got into post-acute medicines because there was an abyss in quality,” he says. “We were accountable to send patients out, and there was nobody to send them to. Or the quality of the facilities was terrible, or the docs or clinicians weren’t going to see those patients regularly. That’s how we got into solving post-acute.”
    6. SHM’s Information Technology Committee, believes that hospitalists have to take ownership of health information technology (HIT) in their own buildings.
      • Kendall Rogers = Chair of SHM Information Technology Committee
      • Future role of hospitalist = QI initiatives, health information technology
      • Training needs, fellowship curricular components
    1. Many hospitalists have added value as local leaders in quality improvement, safety, and innova-tion, but some have functioned more as shift workers. For exam-ple, many community hospital-ists have a 7-days-on, 7-days-off schedule that focuses mainly on high-volume clinical work and sends an unspoken but clear mes-sage that, at the end of an inten-sive clinical “on” stint, one is “off ” and uninvolved. Our impression is that hospitalist programs pro-vide more value when hospital-ists’ inpatient assignments (clini-cal “systole”) are complemented by a systems-oriented “diastole,” dur-ing which clinical activity is limit-ed but they contribute to key in-stitutional programs. Productive diastole is more likely when hos-pitalists have strong leadership, a robust professional-development curriculum, and a mutual hospi-tal–hospitalist commitment to adding value during specified and structured nonclinical time.

      The hospitalists patient is the hospital

    1. The discipline of hospital medicine grew out of the increasing complexity of patients requiring hospital care and the need for dedicated clinicians to oversee their management. The hospitalist model supplanted the traditional method of caring for hospitalized patients, which was often done by clinicians also seeing ambulatory patients or with other clinical obligations that limited their ability to provide the intensity of care often required by these patients. By focusing their practice on this specific group of patients, hospitalists gain specialized knowledge in managing very ill patients and are able to provide high-quality, evidence-based, and efficient patient and family-centered care in hospital settings.
    1. In the academic setting especially, a premium will beplaced on clinical quality improvement, the develop-ment of practice guidelines, and outcomes research,not only to provide the physician with a creative out-let and a potential source of funding during thenonclinical months but also to give the academiccenter a practical research-and-development arm
    2. . The “triple threat” leader— skilled clinician, researcher, and educator — wasthe paradigm of exceptional faculty achievement (orfantasy) for more than a generation. Balancing aproductive research career with teaching and clinicalcare was easier when academic health centers wereless accountable for the quality and cost of clinicalcare than they are now.
    3. As with intensiv-ists, a major challenge is to link the hospitalist rolesuccessfully with other activities.
    4. Conversely, some traditional programs may develophospitalist tracks that emphasize acquisition of theskills most relevant to inpatient practice. If suchtracks are developed, it will be important not to re-duce training in ambulatory care too aggressively,since the competent hospitalist will need a full un-derstanding of what can — and cannot — be donein the outpatient setting
    5. As with anymajor transition, the medical community must con-tinually reevaluate the new approach to ensure thatany possible discontinuity in care is outweighed byimproved clinical outcomes, lower costs, better edu-cation for physicians, and greater satisfaction on thepart of patients.
    6. Oneof the advantages of the hospitalist model is that itcreates a core group of faculty members whose in-patient work is more than a marginal activity andwho are thus committed to quality improvement inthe hospital.
    7. The debate over the role of hospitalists is takingplace against the backdrop of the larger controversyover whether generalists or specialists should pro-vide care for relatively ill patients.11
    8. As hospital stays become shorter and inpatientcare becomes more intensive, a greater premium willbe placed on the skill, experience, and availability ofphysicians caring for inpatients.
    9. First, because of cost pressures,managed-care organizations will reward profession-als who can provide efficient care. In the outpatientsetting, the premium on efficiency requires that thephysician provide care for a large panel of patientsand be available in the office to see them promptlyas required. There is no greater barrier to efficiencyTin outpatient care than the need to go across thestreet (or even worse, across town) to the hospital tosee an unpredictable number of inpatients, some-times several times a day. There are parallel pressuresfor efficiency in the hospital. Since the inpatient set-ting involves the most intensive use of resources, itis the place where the ability to respond quickly tochanges in a patient’s condition and to use resourcesjudiciously will be most highly valued. This shouldprove to be the hospitalists’ forte.
    10. We believe the hospitalist specialty will burgeonfor several reasons.

      1) Cost pressures; 2) Value of care (quality of care divided by its cost)

    11. As a result, we anticipate the rapid growth of anew breed of physicians we call “hospitalists” — spe-cialists in inpatient medicine — who will be respon-sible for managing the care of hospitalized patientsin the same way that primary care physicians are re-sponsible for managing the care of outpatients.
    12. Unfortunately, this approach collides with the re-alities of managed care and its emphasis on efficien-cy.
  5. Apr 2018
    1. The public papers will be expeditious messengers of intelligence to the most remote inhabitants of the Union.

      Many useful and interesting ideas swirl around this and the nearby paragraphs and passages relating to the role of the media in American government. First - The A.P. Gov't exam, textbooks etc. The College board is fond of, and expects students to know and understand the following:

      1. The role of media as a "linkage institution" between citizens and the gov't.
        1. The role of media in "agenda setting" i.e. deciding which issues / events will be put in front of the public.
        2. The tendency toward "horse race journalism" which focuses upon who leads in the polls rather than what their principles and positions on significant issues might be.

      Secondly: I would be inclined to introduce students to this passage after a look at the history and influence of the media in politics & gov't especially as it has made political parties less crucial for candidates hoping to achieve nominations and elections (this is also a notion that the college board will deliver in its test questions)

      Finally - in some of my other research, I came across this quotation by English editor Roger L'Estrange in THE INTELLIGENCER (Aug 3rd 1663) as quoted by Les Adams in his book THE SECOND AMENDMENT PRIMER on p. 115 "A public newspaper makes the multitude too familiar with the actions and councils of its superiors . . . and gives them, not only an itch, but a kind of colourable right and license to be meddling with the government" Perhaps a nice aristocratic counter position to lay alongside the remarks of Brutus concerning the media!

  6. Feb 2018
    1. In today's 24/7 media environment, in which kids may be spending more time with media than they are with their parents, choosing positive role models is more important than ever. By the time kids are in middle school, they start to look to their peers for a sense of what's socially acceptable or desirable. Parents may remain the primary influence in their kids' lives, but the competition starts to get fierce at this age. This separation is entirely age appropriate. But when the media comes into play, the values you want to pass down to your kids may be competing against, say, Homer Simpson's.
    2. The good news is that there are plenty of positive role models you can point to that may influence your kids to make healthy choices, learn to respect others, achieve goals, and avoid anti-social behavior. Negative role models -- especially ones who don't suffer consequences for their actions -- can encourage anti-social behavior, stereotypes, and even cruelty. Help your kids choose positive media role models who embody the values you want to pass down. Tips for parents of young kid
    3. Influencers reach out to kids via TV, YouTube, video games, Twitter, and music -- all of which are broadcast or easily accessible 24 hours a day. And as we all know, not all the characters or people who gain popularity through these channels have stellar role-model credentials.
  7. Nov 2017
    1. The role of the ArchiMate standard is to provide a graphical language for the representation of enterprise architectures over time (i.e., including transformation and migration planning), as well as their motivation and rationale. The evolution of the standard is closely linked to the developments of the TOGAF standard and the emerging results from The Open Group forums and work groups active in this area.
    1. the principal ScrumMaster responsibilities.

      These include:

      • Coach
      • Servant Leader
      • Process Authority
      • Interference Shield
      • Impediment Remover
      • Change Agent
  8. Oct 2017
    1. DHers peer with microscopes and macroscopes, looking into things we cannot see. And even while we delight in building the shiny and the new—and come to meetings like this to celebrate and share and advance that work—we know that someone, sooner or later, curates bits against our ruins.1

      Yes, but in a wider sense is that not the transience of life and that within in? There is a beginning, middle and an end. In the future, our present will be their past, their history. Is there not hope in the fact that if we as DHrs begin this process of peering, analysing, recording and curating now that this process lives on in the future generation of DHrs who will curate our work, our ruins?

  9. May 2017
    1. What is clear, is that data are increasingly conceptualized as inherently valuable products of scientific research, rather than as components of the research process

      Data is beginning to be seen as valuable rather than a left-hand component of the research process.

    Tags

    Annotators

  10. Mar 2017
    1. My colleagues were freaking out and this inspired the post Nature Regains Ground.

      changing roles panic disorientation teachers

    1. First day in class, we had students chatting with a friend of mine working on a Ski Resort in Australia,

      Porous walls. Hybridization. Change narrative

    2. Today as a teacher I am working with the UK, Poland, Italy, Sweden, Finland, Japan, the USA, Brazil, Cameroun. 5 years ago, I was only concerned with a room of twenty five students at one moment, today I am concerned with perhaps something over a 1000 or more students and teachers who are all over the place.

      Changing role of teacher

    3. a writer...(now, I come to think of it, I could say that now, I had never assumed that costume before)

      Writer.

      Blogger at least.

    4. The Spaceman Episode

      Childhood identification with multiple roles.

  11. Feb 2017
  12. Apr 2016
    1. This also represents the lack of power women have in Macbeth

      Or it might represent the subservient role they play to men in public. I think she does have power in the relationship.

  13. Mar 2016
    1. not to provide citizens with jobs. That's the role of the economy.

      Not "provide" but "prepare" citizens for a productive purposeful life that includes a job.

  14. Feb 2014
    1. After the massive expansion of higher education into job training, the promising 18-year-old who goes straight to a residential college is now the odd one out.

      The role of higher-ed has changed to encroach into the territory of community colleges with job training as a goal.