13 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2019
    1. This blog is aimed to help you figure out the most common UX fails that breakdown the mobile experience. Make sure to learn from the mistakes done by others and create a UX that would be loved and appreciated by the majority of your target audience.

  2. Sep 2019
    1. Now You Know- How to Make A Live Streaming App

      With the advancements in smartphone camera technology, ease of internet access, and the emergence of social media sites specifically dedicated to watching videos, it is obvious that video is going to take over the internet. Know about how to build a live streaming app.

  3. Jun 2019
    1. Фильтрация предполагает, что количество записей, после её применения, изменится. Формулировка кнопок фильтрации должна отвечать на вопрос «Что я получу после применения фильтрации?»: новое, мои записи, рестораны, непрочитанные письма и т. д. Применение сортировки не изменяет количество записей. Записи лишь меняют свой порядок. Формулировка должна отвечать на вопрос «По какому принципу упорядочены записи?»: по дате публикации, по рейтингу, в случайном порядке.
  4. May 2019
    1. The sidebar is styled white

      I do like how you've changed the styling a little bit. Being able to have the style fit the particular website is an interesting idea.

    1. Moreover, digital collections can reorder themselves on the fly with interfaces that accommodate diverse audiences. The research interface for a fifth grader should not be the same as that for a professional historian. By starting off as virtual, the Obama library has the potential to rethink how we present, in multiple ways, the vast record of the presidency, to grade schoolers, amateur enthusiasts, casual browsers, and many others. Presidential libraries have always had those different audiences, but going digital-first can make this much more of a reality than a fixed physical space or the often fairly basic websites of existing libraries—all of which were designed for an age of laptops and desktop computers, now a poor baseline when most online visitors access these sites through their smartphone.

      This is an interesting point, but it also presupposes that some staff is going to be building these various interfaces. Who will that be? How will they be supported? It's a whole new level of administration that a library needs to face.

  5. Apr 2019
    1. Instagram, despite not having any official reshare option, allows near unlimited hashtag spamming, and that allows for more deterministic, self-generated distribution. Twitter also isn't as great for spreading visual memes because of its stubborn attachment to cropping photos to maintain a certain level of tweet density per phone screen.

      Some interesting UI clues here that either help or hamper social networks

    1. I find it somewhat interesting to note that with 246 public annotations on this page using Hypothes.is, that from what I can tell as of 4/2/2019 only one of them is a simple highlight. All the rest are highlights with an annotation or response of some sort.

      It makes me curious to know what the percentage distribution these two types have on the platform. Is it the case that in classroom settings, which many of these annotations appear to have been made, that much of the use of the platform dictates more annotations (versus simple highlights) due to the performative nature of the process?

      Is it possible that there are a significant number of highlights which are simply hidden because the platform automatically defaults these to private? Is the friction of making highlights so high that people don't bother?

      I know that Amazon will indicate heavily highlighted passages in e-books as a feature to draw attention to the interest relating to those passages. Perhaps it would be useful/nice if Hypothes.is would do something similar, but make the author of the highlights anonymous? (From a privacy perspective, this may not work well on articles with a small number of annotators as the presumption could be that the "private" highlights would most likely be directly attributed to those who also made public annotations.

      Perhaps the better solution is to default highlights to public and provide friction-free UI to make them private?

      A heavily highlighted section by a broad community can be a valuable thing, but surfacing it can be a difficult thing to do.

  6. Feb 2019
  7. Jan 2019
  8. Dec 2018
    1. I think it is one of those topics with a lot of conjecture John. Apologies if there are too many links.

      Don't apologize for links. It's the web and links are important. In fact I might think that you could have a few additional links here! I would have seen it anyway, but I was a tad sad not to have seen a link to that massive pullquote/photo you made at the top of the post which would have sent me a webmention to boot. (Of course WordPress doesn't make it easy on this front either, so your best bet would have been an invisible <link> hidden in the text maybe?)

      I've been in the habit of person-tagging people in posts to actively send them webmentions, but I also have worried about the extra "visual clutter" and cognitive load of the traditional presentation of links as mentioned by John. As a result, I'm now considering adding some CSS to my site so that these webmention links simply look like regular text. This way the notifications will be triggered, but without adding the seeming "cruft" visually or cognitively. Win-win? Thanks for the inspiration!

      In your case here, you've kindly added enough context about what to expect about the included links that the reader can decide for themselves while still making your point. You should sleep easily on this point and continue linking to your heart's content.

    1. I’m really not sure if linking, in general, has changed over the years. I’ve been doing it the same since day one. But that’s just me.

      Only in the last hour I've had a thought about a subtle change to one of the ways I link. It's not a drastic thing, but it is a subtle change to common practices. Also as I think about it, it removes some of the obviousness of links on social platforms like Twitter that add the ugly @ to a username in addition to other visual changes when one mentions someone else.

  9. Nov 2015
    1. There is a lot of evidence that quite subtle changes to user interfaces can have dramatic effects on how the interfaces are used. For example, the size of a search box or the text that accompanies it can considerably influence the queries that people submit.

      -- David Elsweller

    2. The whole gendered usage of hearts seems to have escaped Twitter. So does the fact that people fave (with stars) in complex ways - they are bookmarks, they are likes, they are nods of the head. But they are not indicators of love. I feel very weird loving tweets by random men I've only just started a conversation with. Not that there's anything wrong with feminine. But women - and men, in their own ways - are well-aware of how feminized visual signals get read by others, and in an identity space like Twitter, I suspect that will really minimize usage. Or at least until we all get used to it.

      -- Bonnie Stewart