12 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2020
    1. I strongly suggest to anyone who wants to become a developer that they do it as well. I mean, it's really easy to see all the work that's out there, and all the things that are left to learn, and think that it's just way beyond you. But when you write it down, you have a place that you can go back to, and not only have I been able to help other people with my blog posts, but I help myself. I'm constantly Googling something and getting my own website in response, and like, oh yeah, I remember I did that before.
  2. Mar 2020
    1. [#contributor: /contributors/59327110a312645844994e4d]|||Free/libre software advocate Richard Stallman is president of the Free Software Foundation. He launched the development of the [free software](http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/free-sw.html) operating system [GNU](http://www.gnu.org/gnu/the-gnu-project.html) in 1984; the [GNU/Linux](http://www.gnu.org/gnu/linux-and-gnu.html) system (essentially GNU with Linux added) is used on tens of millions of computers today. Stallman also founded the League for Programming Freedom, which campaigned against legal threats to programming (including patents).|||

      Clear hints of Markdown syntax in a Wired Formatting error

    2. Skype is a clear example: when one person uses the non-free Skype client software, it requires another person to use that software too – thus surrendering their freedoms along with yours. (Google Hangouts have the same problem.) We should refuse to use such programs even briefly, even on someone else's computer.

      which should be an alternative solution?

    3. Both non-free software and SaaSS can spy on the user, shackle the user, and even attack the user.
    1. The free software movement is a social movement with the goal of obtaining and guaranteeing certain freedoms for software users, namely the freedom to run the software, to study and change the software, and to redistribute copies with or without changes.
  3. Sep 2018
    1. Mr. Dolby, born Thomas Robertson, took his stage name from Dolby Laboratories because of his fascination with audio technology. He said that he decided to use his nerd persona as a way of distinguishing himself from the “good-looking lads” on the 1980s pop scene — Sting, Simon Le Bon, Adam Ant.But, he added, “I am no more comfortable in my geek skin now than in 1982.”

      I'm seeing a slight contradiction here, when Thomas Robertson calls himself Dolby to distinguish himself from the "goodlooking lads", but also implies that he wasn't comfortable in his geek skin. He seems to wear his geek identity proudly but is simultaneously ashamed of it?

  4. Apr 2017
  5. Jun 2016
    1. People who’d swerve off a cliff rather than use a pejorative for race, religion, physical appearance, or disability are all too happy to drop the s‑bomb: Indeed, degrading others for being “stupid” has become nearly automatic in all forms of disagreement.
  6. Apr 2016
    1. one of the annotations is simply a link to a Google search for a phrase that’s been used.

      Glad this was mentioned. To the Eric Raymonds of this world, such a response sounds “perfectly legitimate”. But it’s precisely what can differentiate communities and make one more welcoming than the other. Case in point: Arduino-related forums, in contrast with the Raspberry Pi community. Was looking for information about building a device to track knee movement. Noticed that “goniometer” was the technical term for that kind of device, measuring an angle (say, in physiotherapy). Ended up on this page, where someone had asked a legitimate question about Arduino and goniometers. First, the question:

      Trying to make a goniometer using imu (gy-85). Hoe do I aquire data from the imu using the arduino? How do I code the data acquisition? Are there any tutorials avaible online? Thanks =)

      Maybe it wouldn’t pass the Raymond test for “smart questions”, but it’s easy to understand and a straight answer could help others (e.g., me).

      Now, the answer:

      For me, google found 87,000,000 hits for gy-85. I wonder why it failed for you.

      Wow. Just, wow.

      Then, on the key part of the question (the goniometer):

      No idea what that is or why I should have to google it for you.

      While this one aborted Q&A is enough to put somebody off Arduino forever, it’s just an example among many. Like Stack Overflow, Quora, and geek hideouts, Arduino-related forums are filled with these kinds of snarky comments about #LMGTFY.

      Contrast this with the Raspberry Pi. Liz Upton said it best in a recent interview (ca. 25:30):

      People find it difficult to remember that sometimes when somebody comes along… and appears to be “not thinking very hard”, it could well be because they’re ten years old.

      And we understand (from the context and such) that it’s about appearance (not about “not thinking clearly”). It’s also not really about age.

      So, imagine this scenario. You’re teacher a class, seminar, workshop… Someone asks a question about using data from a device to make it into a goniometer. What’s the most appropriate strategy? Sure, you might ask the person to look for some of that information online. But there are ways to do so which are much more effective than the offputting ’tude behind #LMGTFY. Assuming they do search for that kind of information, you might want to help them dig through the massive results to find something usable, which is a remarkably difficult task which is misunderstood by someone who answer questions about goniometers without knowing the least thing about them.

      The situation also applies to the notion that a question which has already been asked isn’t a legitimate question. A teacher adopting this notion would probably have a very difficult time teaching anyone who’s not in extremely narrow a field. (Those teachers do exist, but they complain bitterly about their job.)

      Further, the same logic applies to the pedantry of correcting others. Despite the fact that English-speakers’ language ideology allows for a lot of non-normative speech, the kind of online #WordRage which leads to the creation of “language police” bots is more than a mere annoyance. Notice the name of this Twitter account (and the profile of the account which “liked” this tweet).

      Lots of insight from @BiellaColeman on people who do things “for the lulz”. Her work is becoming increasingly relevant to thoughtful dialogue on annotations.