92 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2019
  2. Nov 2018
    1. That makes this challenge a lot harder to resolve than if we had tried a century ago

      But even if we had tried a century ago, would it have mattered? The article just stated that "we'd have gotten segregated cities anyways because of behavior that's beyond the reach of regulation."

    2. racial preferences still shape where people choose to live today.

      Fear of what is different?

    3. behavior that's beyond the reach of regulation

      Good way of explaining why we still see segregation in our communities

    4. restrictive covenants

      What is a restrictive covenant?

    5. Fair Housing Act

      What does this act say? When was it passed?

    6. "we would still have very segregated cities, because a certain number whites were unwilling to live with blacks."

      Segregation is still present today. A great example of this is the segregation and disparities we see in inner city public schools.

    7. Shertzer and Walsh are pointing to another set of factors — not the policies of institutions, but the behavior of individuals.

      Racist behaviors. But I do not see how this is novel information? This time period is teeming with examples of racist behavior not motivated by institutional policies.

    8. That makes this earlier form of white flight even more striking; their new homes didn't necessarily have lower taxes or better school districts, factors that complicated the motivations of later generations of whites.

      OK... so this era of White flight is striking because they were leaving for purely racist motivations. Not because there were also better reasons to move out of the city (lower taxes, better schools).

    9. "Whites left the neighborhood as a result of blacks arriving," Shertzer says, "not for other reasons."

      So... racism? Is that what they are considering a "casual" reason for leaving?

    10. As blacks arrived in northern neighborhoods, more whites left.

      I can understand why White people were able to move from neighborhoods. However, how were cities legally able to keep African Americans from moving in to certain neighborhoods?

    11. relevant to American cities that are still racially divided today

      Which cities? I think the cities that are racially divided today would be similar to the ones that were segregated in the past (Chicago, New York, Detroit).

    12. "White flight" is usually described as a post-World War II phenomenon

      I wonder why "White flight" is typically associated with this time period? I think I remember learning about a GI Bill that encouraged this once the soldiers returned home from war.

  3. Oct 2018
    1. For students to work in the open, everything they use has to be original content, openly licensed, or in the public domain

      have to disagree here. Students can link, quote, summarize, paraphrase, and thus build or contribute to open resources from closed information

  4. Aug 2018
    1. differing nomenclature makes the search for a commonly agreed definition or understanding of digital literacies even more elusive

      An important point. I wonder if Bruce's work might help here.

    2. Representation of Digital Intelligence

      I wonder if the similarity to a pie chart hints a message that the components are all equal. The use of the color spectrum also says something about continuity and adjacency which may not be intended. But it looks nice.

  5. Apr 2018
    1. Information we receive without consciously asking a question

      Information diet & filter bubbles are related concepts. I wonder if there is such a thing as "Information Affective Disorder"?

  6. Jan 2018
    1. German students were able to generate more than a dozen questions

      like this emphasis - generating questions is a key IL skill

    2. digital literacy and media literacy

      interesting how this section discusses info lit without using the term. The concepts are all interconnected.

    1. the protection of private information in an online environment has become the responsibility of user

      Certainly an info lit issue. The Information Has Value frame puts heavy emphasis on other people's info, but we also need to be conscious of the value of our own

  7. Dec 2017
    1. I want to argue they have the opposite problem.
    2. information enters a community through only a few restricted channels

      media consolidation since the 90s plays a big role here.

    3. The human mind, however, is arguably broken, and educators must implement a rigorous curriculum of informal logic before our gathering gloom of fallacies, magical thinking, conspiracy theories, and dogma make the Dark Ages look sunny by comparison.

      One problem is people spend much more time and attention outside of educational curricula. The messages from family, friends and media tend to take precedence.

  8. Nov 2017
    1. 26-year-old Norwegian is a professional chess player

      Profession

    1. the ability to connect the dots between people and ideas, where others see no possible connection. An informed perspective is more important than ever

      This points to the value of a broad based liberal education. One needs to see and understand the dots in order to make connections. "Informed perspective" suggests informed learning and info lit.

    1. have the literacies to understand the work

      Great point. Information literacies are for everyone, and we all need to continually develop our own to keep up with evolving modes of communication. Should we be evaluated by people who can only evaluate traditional publishing?

    2. accessible

      Not accessible because they're written for small audiences of specialized experts, and also because they're typically paywalled and off the radar of society at large. That inaccessibility makes it easy for others to distort research and science for political purposes - see the shrimp on a treadmill

    3. public narratives and the possibilities of digital storytelling

      I wonder if ds106 could be part of this? Could we take academese and translate it into internet vernacular? And use that idea as the theme of the course?

    1. when Americans get news online, they increasingly reach for a smartphone (55%), with computer use falling significantly

      Does this impact the quality of the news people receive? News on a phone would have less depth, and possibly trend towards clickbait. Is it more personalized, more subject to algorithmic interference?

    1. the figure is just 53 percent when people are asked specifically about the news that they themselves use

      This bears further investigation. Is it low by historical standards? If so, might it be a result of marketing efforts by media outlets, as they try to distinguish themselves from the competition?

    2. people do not always distinguish between news reports and advertising on news sites, and the contrast between a professionally reported story and the “around the web” recommendations that may accompany it can be jarring

      In the online environment these sites and articles are mixed together as if they were equivalent. When we encounter newspapers in stores, they are generally not adjacent to tabloids.

  9. Oct 2017
    1. Technology is the problem. When the profit motive trumps the public good

      That second thing is the major problem - the attitude that money matters and people don't. Truth becomes a casualty. Humanity becomes a casualty. It manifests itself in the precarious employment situation and the opioid crisis as well as the media.

    1. When he began working on family economics in the 1960s, he reckoned that women have a comparative advantage in “home production”, or domestic tasks; it therefore made sense, to him anyway, that men should specialise in work outside the home and women in work inside.

      How standard family roles came about

    2. As the West industrialised and grew richer and medicine and sanitation improved, death rates fell. Maturing economies had less need of child labour, and more need of the labour of adult women – work which took them out of the home and reduced their ability to care for large broods. What’s more, as both survival rates and the returns on education rose, the imperative when having children shifted from quantity to quality. Investing more in children’s socialisation and education served the interests of both parents and offspring.

      Changing of the times for education and development

    3. amilies had lots of children partly because they needed the labour, and partly because death rates were high. Parents also invested much less in their children’s human capital. Short lifespans and high death rates meant that the returns on educating children and preparing them for life in the world were not especially high; parents with many children could not spare much time on the upbringing of any single one.

      Mid century/ lower class/ why labor was more important than education/ the time they were in had more demand for labor rather than education

    4. The lower orders also put relatively little effort into child-rearing, for the offspring were there to work. Children were active contributors to the family economy, caring for each other and the home, working in the fields, helping with household production of goods for sale at market, and occasionally working in factories or mines.

      Mid century/ lower class/ actions of lower class children

  10. Sep 2017
    1. The studying strategy with “the greatest power,” she adds, involves deeply questioning the text — asking yourself if you agree with the author, and why or why not.

      Etexts have an advantage in the annotation department in that they're not limited to the marginal space. Annotations can be as lengthy as they need to be. They can also be organized through tags, and thus easily searched. They can contain hyperlinks and be hyperlinked, tying texts together. I wonder how many people are taught, in any meaningful or systematic way, to use digital texts. And if they were, how would that change this dilemma.

    1. Contesting refers to the creation of crowdsourced data or prototypes for not yet existent uses for data. It is similar to modeling but with an oppositional rather than persuasive tone.

      Deploying a data-driven vision—what is missing? What can’t we see in the data and why?—was a rallying cry for participation to bring about increased accountability.

      [...] The juxtaposition of rating and lack of trust highlighted an alternate definition of “safety” that was markedly absent in the previous example of using govern-ment data on crime to make residents safe. One relied on a government-sponsored vision of “safety” while the other sought to foster increased accountability among law enforce-ment officers.

      Se podría decir que, por su orígenes en la gobernatón, nuestro enfoque ha sido contestatario y también hemos compartido la idea de mirar qué es lo asuente para iniciar un diálogo sobre el por qué y esto, alineado con lo que ocurre en Ferguson, contrasta visiones gubernamentales y ciudadanas de lo que es la participación.

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    1. University-wide 33–39% of faculty said that fewer than half of their undergraduates meet their expectations

      This could mean that students are lacking in info lit skills, or that a minority of faculty have unrealistic expectations

  11. Aug 2017
    1. pedagogy of research

      makes me think of Bruce's Six Frames, "Learning to Learn" http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.11120/ital.2006.05010002

    2. Sometimes, even people immersed in a discipline don’t quite understand how or why information is organized

      an example of how literacy is a continuum. People immersed in a discipline are hardly "info illiterate," but how and why info is organized is a discipline in itself

  12. Jul 2017
    1. Firefox add-on technology is modernizing

      Note: Starting in Firefox 57, which will be released in November 2017, only add-ons built with this new technology will work in Firefox. These are indicated by the “Compatible with Firefox 57+” label on addons.mozilla.org (AMO). Add-ons built with the old technology are labeled “Legacy” on the about:addons tab. If an add-on does not have the "Compatible with 57+" label, or has the "Legacy" label, the developer may be in the process of transitioning to the new technology. You may find developer contact information on the right side of the add-on listing on AMO.

  13. Mar 2017
    1. many students I met were being told that Wikipedia was untrustworthy and were, instead, being encouraged to do research

      Is this a problem with media literacy? Or does it stem from a mindless bias against Wikipedia? The problem described sounds like literacy taught poorly.

    1. For the past 40 years, society has demanded information literacy of students

      Some people have been advocating for information literacy, but I have not seen evidence of a societal demand. In my experience, info lit is regarded as something that would be nice to have as part of the curriculum, if there was time and as long as someone else is responsible for it. We've spent 40 years trying to get it on the radar of faculty and administration.

    2. Information literacy presumes a set of unbiased institutions and incorruptible instructors are waiting in the wings to begin inculcating the masses with the proper truth procedures.

      I'm not sure of the basis of this characterization of information literacy. It makes it sound as if we assume a mantle of papal infallibility, and it seems to ignore the complexities of info lit.

  14. Feb 2017
    1. ‘information literacy’ suffers from a lack of descriptive power. It is too ambitious in scope, too wide-ranging in application and not precise enough in detail to be useful in an actionable way.

      Interesting point - information literacy is "too big to know." One response has been to define it down, others would fracture it into multiple literacies. While it may be necessary to break it down to make it manageable, the larger view is important too.

    1. Open is a purposeful path towards connection and community. Open pedagogy could be considered as a blend of strategies, technologies, and networked communities that make the process and products of education more transparent, understandable, and available to all the people involved
    1. ndividuals can organize bodies ofknoWl-elg=--Esearch texts or other presentations for useful_analyze----nesvzskills in orderatc0Jprogram" their ownwacq4isition sequences

      These learning skills are all part of info lit.

    2. evoteseeiin = rs= mtensiye- attention to itevelopmentskills _of learning i se =-will enaincreasin =o -le- arn--o10Ille-neehltema c=o _ca.rerarnrne -instrdd

      I see this as a call for information literacy - relates to Bruce's Learning to Learn frame

  15. Nov 2016
  16. Oct 2016
    1. information literacy needs to be embedded in digital inclusion programmes from day one

      make it more than just a library thing.

    2. the ability to critically evaluate information and use it to make informed choices

      concise but narrow definition. compare to Claremont's

    1. Shouldn't algorithmic simulation be studied as a driving cultural force

      understanding information channels and how they operate is a significant part of IL

    2. This is practically identical with librarians' conceptions of information literacy

      yet info lit is so much more - metaliteracy

    3. citizens are to be intelligent shapers of the information society rather than its pawns

      Creating and communicating information are vital parts of info lit - parts that libraries should embrace

    4. a new liberal art that extends from knowing how to use computers and access information to critical reflection on the nature of information itself, its technical infrastructure, and its social, cultural and even philosophical context and impact

      Information comes in many forms and flows through many channels. It is important to understand the grammar and syntax of the forms, and the functions and workings of the channels, in order to understand the information.

    5. clever men who rule over them in virtue of their necessary superiority

      makes me think of "code is law" and the algorithms that run so much of the web

    6. Literacy Compared to What

      Good questions. Is information literacy as ill-defined as the open in open ed?

    7. Should everyone take a course in creating a Web page, computer programming, TCP/IP protocols or multimedia authoring?

      Over the past 20 years, the web has become a basic communications platform, and multimedia a basic form. We need to know them like we need to know keyboarding and MS Word.

  17. May 2016
    1. Jenkins’ argument is that cultural progress is necessarily the result of freedom

      that progress is a result of technical abilities (literacies) as well as permissions

    1. less of a consumer space and one more useful for meaningful learning and interaction

      again connecting to the Value and Authority frames

    2. beyond character decoding and extends to publishing prowess, presentation skills, and the interpretation of things like memes and platforms

      all of which are information literacies look to Belshaw

    3. sociocultural development of participatory perspectives and literacies

      participation in the information ecosystem as a way of developing information literacy

    4. building blocks of the web and encouraging them to take an active role in the construction of their own digital identity

      info has value - owning/controlling your own space & identity online constructing identity - constructing authority

    5. students who are new to this kind of web and this kind of approach to interaction. Significantly, most students haven’t been taught to think about how the natures of knowledge, authority, composition, and learning have changed/are changing.

      This is an information issue, not a digital one. understanding how info flows through different channels, how new channels impact the nature of information,

    1. Identifying what information is needed Finding the information Evaluating the information

      Some situate info lit here. It makes it easy to instruct & assess, but the other three matter just as much if not more. Number 2 is vital - asking good questions is where it starts, and formulating questions is a creative and information skill that is valued in the workplace, and seen as lacking in education. Number 5 is entirely within the librarian's field of expertise. Number 6 may belong to the disciplines in part, but it is a place to connect with them.

  18. Apr 2016
    1. emphasizing information literacy as a holistic, as opposed to task-specific, practice and disposition

      integrate IL

    2. efficiency is not always the primary goal in gathering information

      This definition/description limits IL mainly to finding & evaluating. Why aren't using and creating and communicating in the mix?

    1. It highlights the importance of learner agency, learning in public, control over one’s digital identity, and the increasing importance of Web literacies.

      Consider all the ways this ties to the ACRL Framework

    1. critical comparison of similar messages delivered through multiple modes

      hands on experience with creating media would be useful

    2. Utilize information modalities that fit the needs and expectations of the activity and community of practice.

      connects to DoOO - engage in processes to understand them, practice in multi media

    3. reflective blogging is a way to do this - using comm. modalities to discuss them

    1. Getting students to follow their instructors’ blogs and other informal scholarly writings on the web is a great introduction to this knowledge practice.

      ties to DoOO, connected courses

    2. Maintain a wiki, blog, or other platform to share reflections, thoughts, and analyses of scholarly work in a given discipline, field, or research area.

      Open practices to develop IL

    3. Debate is much more effective at developing this knowledge practice than the more commonplace research papers on hot topics.

      See Bryan Jackson's post on this. Not sure that this could be done in a one-shot though.

    4. This requires A LOT of exposure and practice across multiple courses.

      worth bringing up to faculty? The library doesn't have the manpower to do it all, nor would we get the class time.

    5. there is a big difference between someone who can intellectually describe what they SHOULD do, and actually practice what they preach

      students know how they're supposed to answer questions of authority, but don't always do what they should

    1. infobesity and infoxication - wondering how I can make use of these terms.

      The Discovery/Curation image is good too - a different representation of info lit.

    1. it is not simply about the ability to evaluate information for features such as authenticity, quality, relevance, accuracy, currency, value, credibility and potential bias.

      Of course, neither is information literacy by any definition that I am aware of.

    1. 3. Summarize the background in five sentences or less

      This whole process is a great example of active reading. Could this be adapted into a workshop? Time would be a challenge.

    2. mean literally draw it

      concept mapping FTW

    3. 6. Now read the methods section. Draw a diagram for each experiment, showing exactly what the authors did.

      Purdue method gave methodology the short shrift. The goal there was information extraction rather than deep understanding. "Satisficing"

    4. 1. Begin by reading the introduction, not the abstract.

      Interesting how the process differs from Purdue's. Different intentions though

    1. I made a universally editable spreadsheet that students could interact with throughout the lesson.

      Is there a way to make this work in an info lit one-shot?

  19. Nov 2015
    1. distributing pamphlets that urged an overthrow of the government

      The pamphlets were urging the resistance of the draft, but the book did not state that the attempt was to overthrow the government. Only to express his political ideals.