2,620 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. may be carried into execution, would partake of the prolixity of a legal code, and could scarcely be embraced by the human mind. It would probably never be understood by the public.

      I am lost here. Is this referring to the idea that if the constitution had every subdivision of rules stated that it would not be embraced by human kind and that it would never be understood by the public? Because wouldn't a constitution with accurate details be the most accepted to the public?

    2. quieting the excessive jealousies

      Is here referring to the jealousies of the states to the federal government or the federal government to the states? Who in this scenario is the jealous party leading to the creation of the 10th amendment?

    3. Its nature, therefore, requires that only its great outlines should be marked, its important objects designated, and the minor ingredients which compose those objects be deduced from the nature of the objects themselves.

      At the end of this where it states 'deduced from the nature of the objects themselves' - the objects themselves are the individual states and people in those states, correct? So if there was no mention of the laws regarding bank taxes of states in the constitution, but the grand power of the law is saved for the people, which influence the government, makes me wonder- was this creation of Maryland's bank and bank tax, at all ever voted on by the people? Or was it 'secretly' created and decided by the government of the state alone?

    4. the power of establishing a branch in the State of Maryland might be properly exercised by the bank itself,

      This section confuses me. Is Marshall saying here that not only can the government create a national bank, but they can delegate powers to this bank for it to exercise? Or is it saying that the State of Maryland, where the bank will be established, is to delegate powers to this national bank?

    5. That the power to tax involves the power to destroy;

      Definitely seems like a major quote. Is he basically saying that this would give state governments the power to destroy the federal government?

    6. burden,

      This word choice seems dangerous in how vague it is. A lot of actions that a state might take could be defined as "burdening" a law enacted by Congress. Who decides what is a burden? I wonder if there have been cases that have happened since that argue over whether a state action is a "burden" to a national government function? Or if this part of Marshall's argument has ever been used as precedent for the federal government to stifle state power?

    7. This, then, is not a case of confidence, and we must consider it is as it really is.

      I feel like I've been lost in this paragraph. I'm not entirely sure what is trying to be said here?

    1. Vietnam War, President Truman issued an executive order commanding the secretary of commerce to seize the nation's steel mills and keep them in operation

      incorrect: the book version states: "President Harry S. Truman was not about to let a strike hit the steel industry. The nation was engaged in a war in Korea, and steel production was necessary to produce weapons and other military equipment."

  2. Oct 2021
    1. Barros-Martins, J., Hammerschmidt, S. I., Cossmann, A., Odak, I., Stankov, M. V., Morillas Ramos, G., Dopfer-Jablonka, A., Heidemann, A., Ritter, C., Friedrichsen, M., Schultze-Florey, C., Ravens, I., Willenzon, S., Bubke, A., Ristenpart, J., Janssen, A., Ssebyatika, G., Bernhardt, G., Münch, J., … Behrens, G. M. N. (2021). Immune responses against SARS-CoV-2 variants after heterologous and homologous ChAdOx1 nCoV-19/BNT162b2 vaccination. Nature Medicine, 1–5. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41591-021-01449-9

    1. This is of the very essence of judicial duty.

      When deciding a case, how is being able to disregard the constitution part of judicial duty? Isn't that the backbone for making laws in this country? It the court's duty to determine if the laws are constitutional or not.

  3. Sep 2021
    1. The secretary of state, being a person holding an office under the authority of the United States, is precisely within the letter of the description; and if this court is not authorized to issue a writ of mandamus to such an officer,

      I am a little lost in this area. Why is Madison the name on this case and not Jefferson? Is this sentence explaining that? I don't quite understand they way this is phrased.

    2. appellate jurisdiction may be exercised in a variety of forms

      What does that mean appellate can be exercised in a variety of forms? Is this referring to the different types of lower courts that hears under this type of jurisdiction?

    3. practical and real omnipotence

      As a Federalist, Marshall knows that many of the people reading this opinion will be Anti-Federalists. I'd love if my classmates would weigh in: Do you think he is using the exaggerated language of "omnipotence" to appeal to the Anti-Federalist fear of concentrated power? Do we think Marshall is speaking from a totally neutral judicial stance here, or do aggrandized depictions like these hint that he is letting his political bias shine through?

    4. If then the courts are to regard the constitution; and the constitution is superior to any ordinary act of the legislature; the constitution, and not such ordinary act, must govern the case to which they both apply.

      What would make the constitution not superior if put in the situation of conflict? From my understanding the Constitution is going to be more superior or hold more weight

    5. If the solicitude of the convention, respecting our peace with foreign powers, induced a provision that the supreme court should take original jurisdiction in cases which might be supposed to affect them; yet the clause would have proceeded no further than to provide for such cases, if no further restriction on the powers of congress had been intended.

      What exactly is this stating? I this suggesting that the courts don't have any jurisdiction over foreign powers, and only take cases that are related to their branch?

    6. The principles, therefore, so established, are deemed fundamental. And as the authority, from which they proceed, is supreme, and can seldom act, they are designed to be permanent.

      I know that the peaceful transfer of power between one administration to another is a big deal in the United States and a coveted tradition. Does this case have anything to do with that precedent? Obviously this has to do with judgeship and not the presidency, but refusing to deliver the commissions in the last days of office certainly screams sore loser. So other than establishing judicial review within the courts maybe this case had other effects on the tradition of American politics?

    7. If this obloquy is to be cast on the jurisprudence of our country, it must arise from the peculiar character of the case....

      This whole phrase is just completely in one ear and out the other for me. Would anybody be able to explain what this means? It is just a fancy way for getting into the opinion on the case?

    8. appointment conferred on him a legal right to the office for the space of five years.

      When mentioning Mr. Marbury's commission, they state that he is given a five year term. Were judicial appointments not lifetime appointments within the early years of the court system? Was the term five years for each appointee?

    9. Affirmative words are often, in their operation, negative of other objects than those affirmed; and in this case, a negative or exclusive sense must be given to them or they have no operation at all.

      I am confused on what affirmative words are. What do they have to do with this case? If anything, shouldn't there need to be positive affirmation words towards the case? If it is only negative, then wouldn't that be the opposite of having no operation at all?

    10. That it thus reduces to nothing what we have deemed the greatest improvement on political institutions -- a written constitution -- would of itself be sufficient, in America, where written constitutions have been viewed with so much reverence, for rejecting the construction.

      At this point, Marshall has invoked the idea of and principle behind written constitutions generally about 5 times. I don't take issue with his argument, but is there a reason he acts as if the principle behind a constitution is so well understood but does not invoke specific examples from somewhere else? Did he think this was not helpful for a young United States in defining the scope of its own laws? Or did he not have a useful example of a written constitution from another nation to cite?

    11. To enable this court then to issue a mandamus, it must be shown to be an exercise of appellate jurisdiction, or to be necessary to enable them to exercise appellate jurisdiction.

      I think I'm lost at this point? I'm not entirely sure what point they are trying to make, and there are far too many large words in the previous paragraph for me to be able to make sense of what is happening in this section. I certainly feel lost.

    1. Ovelha

      Animal adulto, se torna ovelha no momento em que parir. Caso nunca pariu, se torna ovelha depois que trocar dentes, por volta de ansos.

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    1. L’esercizio fisico deve essere raccomandato per il controllo del diabete nelle persone con diabete di tipo 2?

      Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

    1. Stephen G. Breyer

      I believe Justice Breyer is part of the majority. Similar to Justice Alito, he gives Layton several hypotheticals. Layton's argument toward these hypotheticals show discrimination by not giving benefits, such as policemen, to a church simply because it is religious. Justice Breyer also sounds annoyed and short with Layton.

    2. Elena Kagan

      I believe Justice Kagan is the second dissenter. She seems to side against Cortman as she argues that the States should have some flexibility in their choices. She questions what would happen if one church received benefits while a different church didn't. Cortman goes on to say that the program is religion blind, but its seemed to me that she was not agreeing with anything he said.

    3. and there is a point where you can accommodate religion,

      I am a little confused with Cortman's argument. If the court favors religion, then theres an Establishment Clause problem, but if the court attacks religion, then theres a Free Exercise Clause problem. How can these things be balanced out? When is it appropriate to accommodate religion? What are other examples of the court accommodating religion?

    4. World Vision brief,

      What is the World Vision Brief? Is this apart of the amicus brief? Im confused and already not familiar about what exactly an amicus brief is.

    5. Neil Gorsuch

      I think justice Gorsuch is another one of the majority voters here. He seems very secure on the basis of religious discrimination as opposed to the questions of sotomayor and kagan who seemed to recognize it as a possible issue with the inclusion of other religions. He already seems convinced that it was a case of discrimination against the church.

    6. For example, in that case, we have independent decisionmaking, which has been key to many of this Court's decisions.

      Layton is in majority rule for the church funding the playground by his statement of independent decision making. He specifically says its in the hands of the state.

    7. But there's -- there's government coercion when you say there's a public benefit, and the only way you could receive that public benefit is if you do not exercise your religion.

      I understand the idea that public benefit from the government and religious states should not mix. Are there other examples of government coercion to public benefit you could provide as examples?

    8. we don't want to, as a country -- well, the vast majority of States, to fund houses of worship.

      I also read this as a sign of a dissenting justice. I believe Sotomayor is a dissenting justice because she strictly says the state does not fund places of worship. She goes on to say that if the state is free from places of worship, then funding it would affect free exercise.

    9. Elena Kagan

      I think this is a great point brought up by justice Kagan. It ties back to one of my questions I left earlier. She seems to think that there may be a risk of favoritism and a violation of that establishment clause that Cortman keeps talking about but going the other way. And again Cortman doesn't do a good job answering that question, in fact in this example he sidesteps it all together and simply says the system is set up to not discriminate and be "religion blind" Although that sounds great, the problem is discriminatory people wont be "religion blind" which is something she seems to realize.

    10. And so on one side you have the Establishment Clause.

      I looked up the establishment clause and it is essentially a clause put within the fifth amendment that prohibits congress from establishing religion. To me it seems like funding a religion is a very good way to establish it so I'm not sure exactly what his point is here. Unless he is suggesting that all religious schools recieve the same public benefits/funding. And unfortunately I have a hard time believing that certain states would ever fund anything other than christianity if it was left to a state level decision.

    11. Okay?

      Based on Justice Breyer's tone in this section, which seems to indicate annoyance with the respondant, I'm going to conclude that he was one of the Justices who voted with the majority. While it is possible that his tone is merely a tool to probe the strength of Layton's legal argument, it sounds more like he has already made up his mind and is growing impatient with having to hear Layton's case.

    12. I know your white light is on.

      Do any of my fellow students know what Justice Kagan is referring to here? Is Cortman's "white light" perhaps a five-minute warning light, since we are reaching the 25-minute mark, and each party gets 30 minutes? Or perhaps it just means "it's time to wrap it up?"

    13. That's a history that's even longer than the Locke history.

      Although I wasn't feeling sure beforehand, this moment from Justice Sotomayor fortified my notion that she was the second dissenting Justice in this case. Just as Ginsberg did, she chose to utilize the Stare Decisis method of decision making, and asserts here that the older a legal precedent that has been set is, the more firmly it holds as an establishment of proper interpretation of law. This solififies her argument that follows, that as a country we should not fund religious places of worship.

    14. Because the kind of examples Your Honor is giving are examples where the -- the benefits are universal. They are not selective, which they are here; they are universal. So we start on the endorsement side.

      This is a very good point that I feel like is ignored. I have to wonder why this was not expanded on further - both by Layton himself or one of the justices.

    15. how Missouri interprets the term "church" in its constitution?

      This question by Justice Alito made me realize that each state may have its own definition of "church". If this is to be one of the deciding factors of this particular case, and a case of the same material opens up in a different state, would the Supreme Court use Trinity Lutheran v. Comer to decide in a similar manner? Or would they have to judge with no stare decisis because of the different terms within the different state constitutions?

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    1. s. This study originated from the desire of tenants to obtain reliable data which they could use for their cause. They did not carry out the study but they were consulted so that its form would serve their needs. They subsequently made use of the findings to argue their case both to the media and to the local authori

      The study had benefit for the communities.

    2. Damp ho

      Damp rental homes creating health issues in Scotland.

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    1. Refusing to stand convicted on the teacher's charges of laziness, I'd spend four hours a night on my homework,working even longer whenever we were assigned an essay. I suppose I could have gotten by with less, but I wasdetermined to create some sort of an identity for myself. We'd have one of those "complete the sentence"exercises, and I'd fool with the thing for hours, invariably settling on something like, "A quick run around thelake? I'd love to. Just give me a minute to strap on my wooden leg." The teacher, through word and action,conveyed the message that, if this was my idea of an identity, she wanted nothing to do with it.

      trying really hard to make himself stand out. spending alot of time on his work maybe going above and beyond. its all for nothing though teacher doesn't seem amused

    2. When called upon, I delivered an effortless list of things I detest: blood sausage, intestinal pâté, brain pudding.I'd learned these words the hard way. Having given it some thought, I then declared my love for IBM typewriters,the French word for "bruise," and my electric oor waxer. It was a short list, but still I managed to mispronounceIBM and afford the wrong gender to both the oor waxer and the typewriter. Her reaction led me to believe thatthese mistakes were capital crimes in the country of France.

      he thought he was doing well until he mispronounced ibm and learns that it was a mistake he shouldn't of made because of how the teacher was ridiculing every single student he was confused as to why the teacher was referring to objects as genders it just didn't make sense to him

    3. While the optimist struggled to defend herself, I scrambled to think of an answer to what had obviously becomea trick question. How often are you asked what you love in this world? More important, how often are you askedand then publicly ridiculed for your answer? I recalled my mother, ushed with wine, pounding the table lateone night, saying, "Love? I love a good steak cooked rare. I love my cat, and I love . . ." My sisters and I leanedforward, waiting to hear our names. "Tums," our mother said. "I love Tums.

      he realized at this moment he was screwed becasue of the teachers attitude towards everyone. he was reminded of his childhood and how he felt towards his mother.

    4. The second Anna learned from the rst and claimed to love sunshine and detest lies. It sounded like a translationof one of those Playmate of the Month data sheets, the answers always written in the same loopy handwriting:"Turn-ons: Mom's famous ve-alarm chili! Turnoffs: Insincerity and guys who come on too strong!!!

      very cliche he probably felt like she was boring

    5. Oh, really," the teacher said. "How very interesting. I thought that everyone loved the mosquito, but here, infront of all the world, you claim to detest him. How is it that we've been blessed with someone as unique andoriginal as you? Tell us, please."

      very sarcastic towards the student

    6. 've moved to Paris in order to learn the language. My school is the Alliance Française, and on the rst day ofclass, I arrived early, watching as the returning students greeted one another in the school lobby. Vacations wererecounted, and questions were raised concerning mutual friends with names like Kang and Vlatnya. Regardlessof their nationalities, everyone spoke what sounded to me like excellent French. Some accents were better thanothers, but the students exhibited an ease and condence I found intimidating. As an added discomfort, theywere all young, attractive, and well dressed, causing me to feel not unlike Pa Kettle trapped backstage after afashion show

      hes feeling nervous apparently and is aware of his surroundings and kind of feels out of place.

    1. Đọc sách nghe tưởng chừng là việc quen thuộc và phức tạp vô cùng đối với nhiều người mà lại trở nên đơn giản đến không tưởng với cách diễn tả sâu sắc qua từng câu chuyện của tác giả Phan Thanh Dũng.

    1. The main idea comes at the beginning, the bodyparagraphs support the main idea, and the conclusion wraps up the whole thing

      This is good to know and remember so you know what to look for when reading something. i have to make sure to have these 3 components when writing any kind of essay.

    1. art. D. 411-2 du code de l’éducation).

      Le conseil d'école vote le règlement intérieur de l'école, établit le projet d’organisation pédagogique de la semaine scolaire, dans le cadre de l'élaboration du projet d'école à laquelle il est associé, donne tous avis et présente toutes suggestions sur le fonctionnement de l'école et sur toutes les questions intéressant la vie de l'école (par exemple, intégration des enfants handicapés, activités périscolaires, restauration scolaire, hygiène scolaire, sécurité des enfants, art. D. 411-2 du code de l’éducation).

  4. Aug 2021
    1. Task 2 Briefly not the main topics throughout each section of the text. This section explains the differences in philosophy from other types of science. It shows how they collect knowledge and that there is not a definite answer to philosophical questions. Restate the main point of th opening paragraph in your own words. The opening paragraphs main point is that philosophy is the study of value. Many time it is undermined by other types of science that claim it is pointless. These people do not allow any kind of growth outside of said science. Estate the main point of the closing paragraph in your own words Philosophy’s goal is not to come to a conclusion but instead expand you thoughts. This is the knowledge that makes it possible to grow how we think. Everyone find and define two vocabulary words Unalloyed-complete and unreserved Dogmatism-the tendency to lay down principles as incontrovertibly true.

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    1. Hillus, David, Tatjana Schwarz, Pinkus Tober-Lau, Hana Hastor, Charlotte Thibeault, Stefanie Kasper, Elisa T. Helbig, et al. “Safety, Reactogenicity, and Immunogenicity of Homologous and Heterologous Prime-Boost Immunisation with ChAdOx1-NCoV19 and BNT162b2: A Prospective Cohort Study,” June 2, 2021. https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.05.19.21257334.

    1. ReconfigBehSci on Twitter: ‘RT @theosanderson: Introducing 🌳https://t.co/m8MusGFkpI: a new tool that lets you dive into a tree of more than a million public SARS-CoV-2…’ / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved 16 August 2021, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1412418927871864835

    1. ZDB-ALT-080528–2

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    1. Prof. Devi Sridhar. “Rest of the World Watching Closely: ‘In Scotland, Estimated That 92.5% of Adults Would Have Tested Positive for Antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a Blood Test in the Week Beginning 12 July 2021’- Is This Enough to Dampen Transmission & Protect under 12s from Infection? Under 18s?” Tweet. @devisridhar (blog), August 4, 2021. https://twitter.com/devisridhar/status/1422852550957617157.

    1. RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-GENO-090402-2

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    1. RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-060322-2

      DOI: 10.7554/eLife.44431

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    2. RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-GENO-100820-2

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    1. RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-010919-2

      DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2018.11.059

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    1. RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-GENO-060623-2

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    1. I like the differentiation that Jared has made here on his homepage with categories for "fast" and "slow".

      It's reminiscent of the system 1 (fast) and system2 (slow) ideas behind Kahneman and Tversky's work in behavioral economics. (See Thinking, Fast and Slow)

      It's also interesting in light of this tweet which came up recently:

      I very much miss the back and forth with blog posts responding to blog posts, a slow moving argument where we had time to think.

      — Rachel Andrew (@rachelandrew) August 22, 2017
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

      Because the Tweet was shared out of context several years later, someone (accidentally?) replied to it as if it were contemporaneous. When called out for not watching the date of the post, their reply was "you do slow web your way…" #

      This gets one thinking. Perhaps it would help more people's contextual thinking if more sites specifically labeled their posts as fast and slow (or gave a 1-10 rating?). Sometimes the length of a response is an indicator of the thought put into it, thought not always as there's also the oft-quoted aphorism: "If I Had More Time, I Would Have Written a Shorter Letter".

      The ease of use of the UI on Twitter seems to broadly make it a platform for "fast" posting which can often cause ruffled feathers, sour feelings, anger, and poor communication.

      What if there were posting UIs (or micropub clients) that would hold onto your responses for a few hours, days, or even a week and then remind you about them after that time had past to see if they were still worth posting? This is a feature based on Abraham Lincoln's idea of a "hot letter" or angry letter, which he advised people to write often, but never send.

      Where is the social media service for hot posts that save all your vituperation, but don't show them to anyone? Or which maybe posts them anonymously?

      The opposite of some of this are the partially baked or even fully thought out posts that one hears about anecdotally, but which the authors say they felt weren't finish and thus didn't publish them. Wouldn't it be better to hit publish on these than those nasty quick replies? How can we create UI for this?

      I saw a sitcom a few years ago where a girl admonished her friend (an oblivious boy) for liking really old Instagram posts of a girl he was interested in. She said that deep-liking old photos was an obvious and overt sign of flirting.

      If this is the case then there's obviously a social standard of sorts for this, so why not hold your tongue in the meanwhile, and come up with something more thought out to send your digital love to someone instead of providing a (knee-)jerk reaction?

      Of course now I can't help but think of the annotations I've been making in my copy of Lucretius' On the Nature of Things. Do you suppose that Lucretius knows I'm in love?

    1. RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-GENO-100402-2

      DOI: 10.7554/eLife.37024

      Resource: (ZFIN Cat# ZDB-GENO-100402-2,RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-GENO-100402-2)

      Curator: @scibot

      SciCrunch record: RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-GENO-100402-2


      What is this?

    1. RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-070118-2

      DOI: 10.7554/eLife.68755

      Resource: (ZFIN Cat# ZDB-ALT-070118-2,RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-070118-2)

      Curator: @scibot

      SciCrunch record: RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-070118-2


      What is this?

  5. Jul 2021
    1. Well, no. I oppose capital punishment, just as (in my view) any ethical person should oppose capital punishment. Not because innocent people might be executed (though that is an entirely foreseeable consequence) but because, if we allow for capital punishment, then what makes murder wrong isn't the fact that you killed someone, it's that you killed someone without the proper paperwork. And I refuse to accept that it's morally acceptable to kill someone just because you've been given permission to do so.

      Most murders are system 1-based and spur-of-the-moment.

      System 2-based murders are even more deplorable because in most ethical systems it means the person actively spent time and planning to carry the murder out. The second category includes pre-meditated murder, murder-for-hire as well as all forms of capital punishment.

    1. RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-GENO-060619-2

      DOI: 10.1002/cne.24042

      Resource: (ZFIN Cat# ZDB-GENO-060619-2,RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-GENO-060619-2)

      Curator: @scibot

      SciCrunch record: RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-GENO-060619-2


      What is this?

    1. Zebrafish: Tg(sox10:Gal4-VP16,cmlc2:EGFP)sq9

      DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2019.08.001

      Resource: (ZFIN Cat# ZDB-ALT-130826-2,RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-130826-2)

      Curator: @ethanbadger

      SciCrunch record: RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-130826-2


      What is this?

    2. Zebrafish: Tg(olig2:DsRed)vu19

      DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2019.08.001

      Resource: (ZFIN Cat# ZDB-ALT-080321-2,RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-080321-2)

      Curator: @ethanbadger

      SciCrunch record: RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-080321-2


      What is this?

    3. Zebrafish: Tg(sox10(4.9):nls-Eos)w18

      DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2019.08.001

      Resource: (ZFIN Cat# ZDB-ALT-110721-2,RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-110721-2)

      Curator: @ethanbadger

      SciCrunch record: RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-110721-2


      What is this?

    1. RRID: ZFIN_ ZDB-ALT-090715-2

      DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2019.04.030

      Resource: (ZFIN Cat# ZDB-ALT-090715-2,RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-090715-2)

      Curator: @ethanbadger

      SciCrunch record: RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-090715-2


      What is this?

    2. RRID: ZFIN_ ZDB-TGCONSTRCT-130108-2

      DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2019.04.030

      Resource: ZFIN_ ZDB-TGCONSTRCT-130108-2

      Curator: @ethanbadger

      SciCrunch record: RRID:ZFIN_ ZDB-TGCONSTRCT-130108-2


      What is this?

    1. Zebrafish: Tg(mbp:egfp-caax)ue2

      DOI: 10.1016/j.celrep.2019.03.013

      Resource: (ZFIN Cat# ZDB-ALT-120103-2,RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-120103-2)

      Curator: @ethanbadger

      SciCrunch record: RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-120103-2


      What is this?

    2. Zebrafish: Tg(olig2:dsred)vu19

      DOI: 10.1016/j.celrep.2019.03.013

      Resource: (ZFIN Cat# ZDB-ALT-080321-2,RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-080321-2)

      Curator: @ethanbadger

      SciCrunch record: RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-080321-2


      What is this?

    3. Zebrafish: Tg(sox10(4.9):nls-eos)w18

      DOI: 10.1016/j.celrep.2019.03.013

      Resource: (ZFIN Cat# ZDB-ALT-110721-2,RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-110721-2)

      Curator: @ethanbadger

      SciCrunch record: RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-110721-2


      What is this?

    1. ZDB-ALT-170509-2

      DOI: 10.1016/j.neuron.2017.06.001

      Resource: (ZFIN Cat# ZDB-ALT-170509-2,RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-170509-2)

      Curator: @Zeljana_Babic

      SciCrunch record: RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-170509-2


      What is this?

    2. ZDB-ALT-131122-2

      DOI: 10.1016/j.neuron.2017.06.001

      Resource: (ZFIN Cat# ZDB-ALT-131122-2,RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-131122-2)

      Curator: @Zeljana_Babic

      SciCrunch record: RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-131122-2


      What is this?

    1. ZFIN ID: ZDB-ALT-140424-2

      DOI: 10.7554/eLife.66596

      Resource: (ZFIN Cat# ZDB-ALT-140424-2,RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-140424-2)

      Curator: @evieth

      SciCrunch record: RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-140424-2


      What is this?

    2. ZFIN ID: ZDB-ALT-070118-2

      DOI: 10.7554/eLife.66596

      Resource: (ZFIN Cat# ZDB-ALT-070118-2,RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-070118-2)

      Curator: @evieth

      SciCrunch record: RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-070118-2


      What is this?

    1. A Digital Scholarly Edition: The Willa Cather Archive

      This website is what I kept picturing when I heard the words "digital humanities project". This is like most of the websites I have interacted with, with posts on the main page and categorized tabs at the top for anything else you are looking for. I think I could probably branch out and explore different ones now that I know the wide variety out there.

    2. A searchable map of the addresses contained in the 1956 Negro Travelers’ Green Book, which the user can filter by state or establishment type.

      I think that this idea for a digital project is really interesting. I like that they have mapped it out and you can click on a point to filter by state or establishment type to zero in on what interests you. I never thought that a digital humanities project could look like this. I think it is really cool how different all of these projects are on this site, yet they all fall under the umbrella of digital humanities.

    3. Many  students tell me that in order to get started with digital humanities, they’d like to have some idea of what they might do and what technical skills they might need in order to do it.

      I am usually that person who likes to know what they're getting into before they start. I like to know what skills I need as well so I can see if I will be able to do it easily or if it will be more of a learning curve. I definitely did not know anything about digital humanities before I started this class, but I am learning with each exercise we do. I think a lot of people like to be confident in what they are doing so to have some idea of what they are going to do and what skills they need is reassuring.

    1. Informal and pre-or postpublication communication with fellow scholars to share research questions or results was traditionally carried out through letter-writing, then by phone or fax and in the digi-tal age variably through Gophers, forums, chat rooms, RSS feeds, wikis, listservs and e-mail. Blogging is a way of discussing or sharing informa-tion on the web by uploading posts (discrete, usually brief notices). These are often displayed with the most recent item at the top.

      Blogging is a convenient way to get information out to an audience. Rather than letter-writing or phone, and then into email and chat rooms, blogging allows you to share information and knowledge by posting your thoughts. It can stay up for as long as you like, allowing a variety of people to view it. I think it is a way to share your ideas and get information out faster.

    2. Might we be approaching the time when the distinction created by the term homo Jaber, the human as maker, outside and above the world of her creations, becomes meaning-less in the world of the semantic web and 3D bacterial printing?

      I do not think the term homo faber, or human as maker has become meaningless because of the digital world of the web and 3D printing. The digital is using that term in a different way. Yes, digital things are done online with the help of certain tools and software, but it is still the human behind the screen. It is the human as maker with the ideas and creativity for these new digital concepts and the ability and knowledge to develop them. People can use the digital to enhance their ideas.

    3. Only most recently with the digital has this kit of tools begun to change rapidly and fundamentally. Yet in many ways these new digital tools carry on, in analogous ways, the same functions of the traditional humanities.

      I think it is true that for the most part the environments of the humanities have been things like the scholar's desk, lecture halls, campuses, and convention halls. In the last little bit there has been a shift from these environments in that the digital has now come in to play. I agree that the digital tools carry on the same functions as traditional humanities in comparable ways. We are still learning about the humanities by using a digital form, it is just a newer way of presenting them.

  6. Jun 2021
    1. Oversharing. Crying, disclosing intimate details, and telling long (unrelated and/or unsolicited) stories about one’s personal life may indicate the lack of an essential social work skill: personal boundaries.

      Testing out the annotate feature. Student 1 will highlight sections according to the prompts, as shown HERE.

      For example: "This is me during interviews. I say too much and veer off topic."

    1. ZFIN: ZDB-ALT-061204-2

      DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2021.05.042

      Resource: (ZFIN Cat# ZDB-ALT-061204-2,RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-061204-2)

      Curator: @Naa003

      SciCrunch record: RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-061204-2


      What is this?

    2. ZFIN: ZDB-ALT-150324-2

      DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2021.05.042

      Resource: (ZFIN Cat# ZDB-ALT-150324-2,RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-150324-2)

      Curator: @Naa003

      SciCrunch record: RRID:ZFIN_ZDB-ALT-150324-2


      What is this?

    1. Miguel Hernán. (2021, February 15). To all who claim that there’s no evidence that #SARSCoV2 is transmitted in bars: If the risk of transmitting #SARSCoV2 is provenly greater in crowded indoor places, why should bars be magically protected? Burden of the proof is on bar’s owners, not on scientists @BillHanage [Tweet]. @_MiguelHernan. https://twitter.com/_MiguelHernan/status/1361463022187864066