10 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2021
  2. Jan 2021
    1. I've often said that a well-designed system makes it easy to do the right things and annoying (but not impossible) to do the wrong things. If we design our applications properly, our users should be inexorably drawn into the pit of success. Some may take longer than others, but they should all get there eventually.

      Basically make it easy to do the right thing. Or have constraints that forces the user to follow up in a specific way, and later on it isn't hard to comply and follow through either. example the way python is designed, it makes it almost impossible for the user to mess up memory allocation. Like the pit of despair in C++

    1. Crux -

      1. Apple is not a company where general managers oversee managers; rather, it is a company where experts lead experts. The assumption is that it’s easier to train an expert to manage well than to train a manager to be an expert.
      2. Whereas the fundamental principle of a conventional business unit structure is to align accountability and control, the fundamental principle of a functional organization is to align expertise and decision rights.
      3. In a functional organization, individual and team reputations act as a control mechanism in placing bets. So, that means if the camera team pitches an idea, but the same doesn't receive a good response from the users, for the next model the camera team's functionality will have a lower priority than suppose the touch team.
      4. As is often the case with decentralized business units, managers were inclined to fight with one another, over transfer prices in particular.
      5. Managers should be expertise in their fields. They should spend majority of their time either owning, learning or teaching, and less of delegating. Each piece they work on should be deeply thought of . Squircle scenario.
      6. Cross functional debates
    1. Crux -

      1. Calm plants the seeds of crazy. And also crazy plants the seeds of calm. Basically when times are good, we indulge in it, become complacent about our achievements, become skeptic of the warnings ahead. So, when something bad hits, it's a shock. Similarly crazy plants the seeds of calm, when we are going through a societal shock, we come up with revolutionary solutions, that can help to bring calm for the years to come.
      2. Progress requires optimism and pessimism. Shoot for the stars aim for the moon. Be prepared for the worst, give your best.
      3. People believe what they want to believe, see what they want to see, and hear what they want to hear. Either the model of how I think is wrong, or the other person is wrong. And it is often the latter that people go with, since it is the path of least resistance, both to make changes yourself, and as well as your image.
      4. Important things rarely have one cause
      5. Risk is what you don't see
    2. Two things happen when you’re caught off guard. One is that you’re vulnerable, with no protection against what you hadn’t considered. The other is that surprise shakes your beliefs in a way that leaves you paranoid and pessimistic

      You can't control the first part of it, as you can't predict every other possibility out there. But you sure as hell can control the latter part of it, and not let the surprise render you paralyzed. And rather take rational decisions ahead. Because, that's one thing under your control, how you react to it, and not what happens to you. That's how the US responded to pearl harbor, they did not sit back shaken, they gathered their composure and came back strong.

  3. Oct 2020
    1. The linear life is dead. Americans have been told for decades that our lives will follow predictable, linear paths interrupted by periodic “crises” on birthdays that end in zero. The backbone of this paradigm was a series of carefully calibrated progressions—from dating to marriage to children to empty nest; from low-level job to mid-level job to senior-level job to retirement. Today that idea is preposterously behind the times. We no longer expect to have just one job, one relationship, one spirituality, one sexuality, one source of happiness from adolescence to assisted living.

      Instead it is non-linear life right now, where it is all intertwined into a complex swirl of setbacks, celebrations, triumphs and rebirths.

    2. There’s no such thing as a midlife crisis. The idea of the “midlife crisis” was first articulated by a psychoanalyst named Elliott Jaques in 1957. He claimed that people in their mid-30s go through a depressive period brought on by first contemplating their mortality. Jaques didn’t do any research; he just read a bunch of biographies of famous men. He didn’t include women, he said, because menopause “obscured” their midlife transitions. When Gail Sheehy popularized the idea in the 70s, based primarily on some very iffy research by Dan Levinson at Yale (he interviewed only 40 people, and again only men), she said the midlife crisis must start in the 40th year and will end at 45 ½. This is all bunk. My research shows that we suffer a series of three to five lifequakes, as I call them, all across our lives. These could be medical issues, career shifts, change in sexual practices, as well as divorce, social movements like #MeToo or #BlackLiveMatter, or external events like a tornado, a financial crisis, a downsizing, or a pandemic. Some of these are voluntary, others are involuntary.

      Also, the latest research points at these lifequakes lasting on an average for about five years.

    1. The crux being -

      1. Exercise, that's the best drug to get your brain running, and it is true. I have experienced the best ideas hit me when I am exercising or about to sleep, which brings me to the second point
      2. Get ample amount of sleep, it helps to build synapses, and literally updates your brain as per research.
      3. Form habits, 3 elements - cue > routine > reward
      4. There are lot many memorization techniques, like - Memory palace, graphic representation and spaced repetitions, try and see which fits best.
      5. Make chunks, or divide in modules whatever you learn, making it easier to access and use.
      6. And finally, if the task seems tough, it is because it is new. Just start, as and when the synapses are formed it becomes easier to do it again and again, and even more rewarding in the future. Kinda like building a habit.
    2. Explaining yourself to others helps you understand more.

      Very similar to the feynman technique, the only difference being he suggests to teach yourself as you are teaching a five year old kid. But yeah, teaching and getting feedback, and repeating the loop makes you learn better as well.

    3. Your errors are sometimes easier to be found by others.

      Since they don't have the same bias as you do. Meaning, they will take a more keen look at it, and hence increase the chance of finding something off. Often times when you are debugging, you do need the help of another coder, to try to explain the code to, to get a chance to catch the errors.