5 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2020
    1. The linear life is dead. Americans have been told for decades that our lives will follow predictable, linear paths interrupted by periodic “crises” on birthdays that end in zero. The backbone of this paradigm was a series of carefully calibrated progressions—from dating to marriage to children to empty nest; from low-level job to mid-level job to senior-level job to retirement. Today that idea is preposterously behind the times. We no longer expect to have just one job, one relationship, one spirituality, one sexuality, one source of happiness from adolescence to assisted living.

      Instead it is non-linear life right now, where it is all intertwined into a complex swirl of setbacks, celebrations, triumphs and rebirths.

    2. There’s no such thing as a midlife crisis. The idea of the “midlife crisis” was first articulated by a psychoanalyst named Elliott Jaques in 1957. He claimed that people in their mid-30s go through a depressive period brought on by first contemplating their mortality. Jaques didn’t do any research; he just read a bunch of biographies of famous men. He didn’t include women, he said, because menopause “obscured” their midlife transitions. When Gail Sheehy popularized the idea in the 70s, based primarily on some very iffy research by Dan Levinson at Yale (he interviewed only 40 people, and again only men), she said the midlife crisis must start in the 40th year and will end at 45 ½. This is all bunk. My research shows that we suffer a series of three to five lifequakes, as I call them, all across our lives. These could be medical issues, career shifts, change in sexual practices, as well as divorce, social movements like #MeToo or #BlackLiveMatter, or external events like a tornado, a financial crisis, a downsizing, or a pandemic. Some of these are voluntary, others are involuntary.

      Also, the latest research points at these lifequakes lasting on an average for about five years.

    1. The crux being -

      1. Exercise, that's the best drug to get your brain running, and it is true. I have experienced the best ideas hit me when I am exercising or about to sleep, which brings me to the second point
      2. Get ample amount of sleep, it helps to build synapses, and literally updates your brain as per research.
      3. Form habits, 3 elements - cue > routine > reward
      4. There are lot many memorization techniques, like - Memory palace, graphic representation and spaced repetitions, try and see which fits best.
      5. Make chunks, or divide in modules whatever you learn, making it easier to access and use.
      6. And finally, if the task seems tough, it is because it is new. Just start, as and when the synapses are formed it becomes easier to do it again and again, and even more rewarding in the future. Kinda like building a habit.
    2. Explaining yourself to others helps you understand more.

      Very similar to the feynman technique, the only difference being he suggests to teach yourself as you are teaching a five year old kid. But yeah, teaching and getting feedback, and repeating the loop makes you learn better as well.

    3. Your errors are sometimes easier to be found by others.

      Since they don't have the same bias as you do. Meaning, they will take a more keen look at it, and hence increase the chance of finding something off. Often times when you are debugging, you do need the help of another coder, to try to explain the code to, to get a chance to catch the errors.