30 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2020
    1. Being audience and culturally aware, resolving conflict appropriately, using technology tools effectively, and taking responsibility for personal and group productivity.

      3 of these 4 are goals for my classroom without tech even on my mind, but with tech, they can transcend even further into the daily lives of digitally literate students

    2. Learning through making involves constructing new content

      design, revise, remix, MAKE SOMETHING

    3. reading online requires a basic understanding of web mechanics

      searching, determining credibility, etc.

    1. At least five processing practices occur during online research and comprehen-sion: (1) reading to identify important questions, (2) reading to locate information, (3) reading to evaluate information critically, (4) reading to synthesize informa-tion, and (5) reading to communicate information

      how do we make sure that students are not just "skimming" or doing #2???

    1. MediaSmarts has drawn on the work of academics and educators across the country to develop a curriculum framework to ensure that students from Kindergarten to Grade 12 can receive a comprehensive digital literacy education. This framework consists of lessons, classroom activities and other teacher resources that translate the five key concepts into specific digital literacy skills that are essential for each grade level. These skills are grouped into seven categories: Ethics and Empathy: This category addresses students’ social-emotional skills and empathy towards others as well as their ability to make ethical decisions in digital environments when dealing with issues such as cyberbullying, sharing other people’s content and accessing music and video. Privacy and Security: This includes essential skills for managing students’ privacy, reputation and security online, such as making good decisions about sharing their own content, understanding data collection techniques, protecting themselves from malware and other software threats, and being aware of their digital footprint. Community Engagement: Resources in this category teach students about their rights as citizens and consumers, and empower them to influence positive social norms in online spaces and to speak out as active, engaged citizens. Digital Health: Digital health skills include managing screen time and balancing students’ online and offline lives; managing online identity issues; dealing with issues relating to digital media, body image and sexuality; and understanding the differences between healthy and unhealthy online relationships. Consumer Awareness: These skills allow students to navigate highly commercialized online environments. They include recognizing and interpreting advertising, branding and consumerism; reading and understanding the implications of website Terms of Service and privacy policies; and being savvy consumers online. Finding and Verifying: Students need the skills to effectively search the Internet for information they need for personal and school purposes, and then evaluate and authenticate the sources and information they find. Making and Remixing: Making and remixing skills enable students to create digital content and use existing content for their own purposes in ways that respect legal and ethical considerations, and to use digital platforms to collaborate with others.

      all things that can easily be worked into any curriculum that involves technology

    2. citizens who lack digital literacy skills risk being disadvantaged when it comes to accessing healthcare, government services and opportunities for employment, education and civic participation

      as teachers, we need to connect them to the world around them.. this world is digital in the modern age, so we can offer them not only the opportunity to do good for others but also for themselves

    3. Today’s youth are often called “digital natives” by adults because of the seemingly effortless way they engage with all things technological.

      we can prepare them for the future workforce; many jobs require certain skills with tech - managing social media, programming, contacting customers via chat and phone, etc.

  2. Mar 2019
    1. Reading on the web is a critical skill for engaging content online. They can be viewed as “exploring,” or “navigating the web.” Just as traditional reading requires knowledge of the text and concepts of print, reading online requires a basic understanding of web mechanics. Good online readers know the tools and strategies that can be used to search for and locate people, resources, and information. They then know how to judge the credibility of these sources.1 The web literacy skills and competencies identified under reading on the web are as follows. Search

      Web Literacy 2.0 discusses how people use web literacy in their everyday lives. For example, "navigating the web" needs to be taught just as the concepts of print do. Quality online readers know where to look, what to ignore, and how to locate information. Writing on the web is also a skill that needs to be explicitly taught. A writer must be able to learn through making and creating. They must be able to communicate their ideas in written word, through presentations as well as through well organized and chosen aesthetics. Rating 10/10

  3. Jul 2018
    1. Alan poses a question in his TEDx talk that we should ask students: “Do you know how to use Google?” Of greater importance, the same question should be asked of teachers.

      Video: Alan November TEDx talk "Do you know how to use google?" We need web literacy for teachers as well

    1. The Teaching Tolerance Digital Literacy Framework offers seven key areas in which students need support developing digital and civic literacy skills. The numbered items represent the overarching knowledge and skills that make up the framework. The bullets represent more granular examples of student behaviors to help educators evaluate mastery.

      Digital Literacy Framework of Points

  4. May 2018
  5. Jul 2017
    1. The Internet is this generation’s defining technology for literacy and learning within our global community.2.The Internet and related technologies require new literacies to fully access their potential.

      Completely agree with this statement!

    2. The new literacies of online research and comprehension frames online reading comprehension as a process of problem-based inquiry involving the skills, strategies, dispositions, and social practices that take place as we use the Internet to conduct research, solve problems, and answer ques-tions.

      This is an essential part of PBL, internet research is the essential skill students need to be able to obtain information and analyze their findings.

    3. How can we develop adequate understanding when the very object that we seek to study continuously changes?

      This can be seen as a problem or as an advantage, information is always changing, ideas are been created and developed. Students and teachers do not need to wait for books to print materials to be accessible, is right there.. one click away, now how we find and analyze information on the web is the tool our students need to become web literate .

    4. Consider, for example, just a few of these new technologies: Twitter, Facebook, Google+, Siri, Foursquare, Drop-box, Skype, Chrome, iMovie, Contribute, or any of many, many mobile “apps” and ebooks

      students using this sites need to have web-literacy skills to obtain accurate and relevant information.

    1. It is the responsibility of educators in all grades and content areas to modify as needed for learners.

      Educators guiding these students should have the necessary skills to effectively modify the route of the inquiry. some may argue that pre-k students are too young for this projects, but with the right guidance even little ones can benefit from it.

  6. www.literacyandtechnology.org www.literacyandtechnology.org
    1. TPACK What knowledge do teachers need in order to facilitate student research? Understanding complex relationships among technology, pedagogy, and content with models like the TPACK framework may facilitate teacher growth in new literacies

      TPACK and web-literacy has been proven to help student to deductive evaluate, organize and synthesizing information effectively

    1. when students share what they have learned not only about the information they found, but the sources and strategies they used to uncover that information.

      higher level of thinking! this skills will help students to become leaders rather to recall information. In the end of the day, everyone can search and find imformation at anytime, but can they find the "right" information?

    2. 1

      when directing students to google searchs, is important to guide our students to "get their web literacy hat on" this means to use their reading strategies to ensure the information is valid, important and related to our search.

    1. Wikipedia is broadly misunderstood by faculty and students alike. While Wikipedia must be approached with caution, especially with articles that are covering contentious subjects or evolving events, it is often the best source to get a consensus viewpoint on a subject. Because the Wikipedia community has strict rules about sourcing facts to reliable sources, and because authors must adopt a neutral point of view, articles are often the best available introduction to a subject on the web.

      using Wikipedia as a source of information

    1. The habit is simple. When you feel strong emotion — happiness, anger, pride, vindication — and that emotion pushes you to share a “fact” with others, STOP. Above all, it’s these things that you must fact-check. Why? Because you’re already likely to check things you know are important to get right, and you’re predisposed to analyze things that put you an intellectual frame of mind. But things that make you angry or overjoyed, well… our record as humans are not good with these things. As an example, we might cite this tweet which recently crossed my Twitter feed: You don’t need to know that much of the background here to see the emotionally charged nature of this. President Trump had insulted Chuck Schumer, a Democratic Senator from New York, saying tears that Schumer shed during a statement about refugees were “fake tears”.  This tweet reminds us that that Senator Schumer’s great grandmother died at the hands of the Nazis, which could explain Schumer’s emotional connection to the issue of refugees. Or does it? Do we actually know that Schumer’s great-grandmother died at the hands of the Nazis? And if we are not sure this is true, should we really be retweeting it?

      Example of importance of fact-check. How to spy lies based on a truthful story.

    1. Check for previous work: Look around to see if someone else has already fact-checked the claim or provided a synthesis of research. Go upstream to the source: Go “upstream” to the source of the claim. Most web content is not original. Get to the original source to understand the trustworthiness of the information. Read laterally: Read laterally.[1] Once you get to the source of a claim, read what other people say about the source (publication, author, etc.). The truth is in the network. Circle back: If you get lost, or hit dead ends, or find yourself going down an increasingly confusing rabbit hole, back up and start over knowing what you know now. You’re likely to take a more informed path with different search terms and better decisions.

      Some ideas for checking Facts in the web

    1. When he read the Web address, http://pubweb.northwestern.edu/~abutz/di/intro.html, he assumed that the domain name “northwestern.edu” automatically meant it was a credible source. He did not understand that the “~” character, inserted after the domain name, should be read as a personal Web page and not an official document of the university.

      Even though I consider myself web literate enough to tell the difference between a personal and academic page, I honestly didn't know that the "~" denoted that. I really need to get better about thinking of web addresses and code as a language (which they are).

    1. “The only way to save a democracy is to explain the way things work,” says Linus Neumann, a CCC spokesman and information security consultant. “Understanding things is a good immunization.”

      democracy and web literacy

  7. Apr 2017
    1. Mozilla Web Literacy Map (https://wiki.mozilla.org/Webmaker/WebLiteracyMap).

      Chatting with Mozilla's current person in charge about open practice/pedagogy. We could quote her here

  8. Mar 2017
    1. In 2017 the need to teach fact-checking and source analysis looms larger than ever

      What evidence supports this claim. Are recruiters reporting that college graduates are unable to show proficiency in fact-checking sources or evaluating and verifying information they find on the internet?

  9. Feb 2017