277 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. There’s something else that the Space Age did for our civilization: it unified the sciences in a way that was actually necessary. Because it wasn’t until Sputnik and the space missions that followed that the wall between the scientific disciplines came down.

      the launch of the Sputnik is one turning point in the history

  2. Mar 2020
    1. The continents and seas and isles on this map were not those of the world I knew; and their names were written in heteroclitic runes of a lost alphabet.

      stranger in a strange land indeed

    2. There was a spell of perpetual quietude upon the air, and never the slightest rippling of leaves or water; and the whole landscape hung before me like a monstrous vision of unbelievable realms apart from time and space.

      the feeling of too large things to be seen

    1. When analysing people, numbers present an illusion of precision and accuracy. 

      Modeling introduces simplification

  3. Dec 2019
    1. a download does not translate to a lost sale.

      hmm

    2. I do not pretend that uploading or downloading unpurchased electronic books is morally correct, but I do think it is more of a grey area than some of your readers may.

      hmm, good point

    3. But he’s also uploaded hundreds of books to file sharing sites and he’s downloaded thousands.

      very much like the others

    1. The two graphs were completely different, implying that to ignore the extreme cases is to ignore reality. "I'm extremely visual," Mandelbrot said. "Often the pictures suggest the deeper truth underlying the formulas."

      graphicacy. and in social dynamics too,

    1. internalize the norms of this institution and expect the wider society to operate in accordance with these norms;

      materialists are more idealists than idealists

    2. the more its female intellectuals will exhibit the same disproportionate anti-capitalism its male intellectuals show.

      hmm, interesting prediction..

    3. the society seems to announce that

      seems to... are the key words

    4. If you were designing a society, you would not seek to design it so that the wordsmiths, with all their influence, were schooled into animus against the norms of the society.

      Caste...

    5. the norms within schools will affect the normative beliefs of people after they leave the schools.

      and this alos does depend on the type of school

    6. For distribution in a centrally planned socialist society stands to distribution in a capitalist society as distribution by the teacher stands to distribution by the schoolyard and hallway.

      nice analogy

    7. deemed that philosophers should rule

      philosopher kings

    8. Indeed, there need not be any pattern of distribution a society is aiming to achieve, even a society concerned with justice.

      This would be very artificial indeed, and the resources spent to achieve this will be far larger than that saved

  4. Nov 2019
    1. If the experience of the English is typical, heavy tea-drinking will produce English moral philosophy, a tendency toward a pale complexion, hypocrisy and backbiting.

      take that tea drinkers

    2. This coffee falls into your stomach,

      i want such coffee

    3. Connoisseurs pursue coffee drinking the way they pursue all their passions; they proceed by increments, and, like Nicolet, move from strong to stronger stuff, until consumption becomes abuse.

      glad i restrcited to once per day

    4. Many people claim coffee inspires them; but as everybody likewise knows, coffee only makes boring people even more boring.

      hmmm

    1. The miracle of the finite but universal library is a mere inflation of the miracle of binary notation: everything worth saying, and everything else as well, can be said with two characters.

      Yes or No

    2. Numbers are cheap.

      Yes they are. As much in academics as in real world

    1. The view from the parapet was vertiginous, but in time one gets used to anything.

      Of course one can.

    1. The point of poetry is, in a sense, to reveal the deep twining of language and meaning. At least it was for Brodsky (when I audited his poetry seminar in Ann Arbor). To really register this power takes time.

      does it come to you when you give it enough time?

    2. using the right (not as opposed to left, but as opposed to wrong) part of our brains to do so.

      hmm

    3. In general, cronopios are depicted as naive and idealistic, disorganised, unconventional and sensitive creatures, who stand in contrast or opposition to famas (who are rigid, organised and judgmental if well-intentioned) and esperanzas (who are plain, indolent, unimaginative and dull).

      hmm, strange indeed what are these in human terms

    4. In my experience, especially now that we are fully enrolled in the digital way of things, most of the day’s reading is a grasshoppering from here to there, and sometimes back again.

      same happens with me too - nice phrase for reading multiple things at the same time - grapsshoppering

    5. missionary position’ of reading. A book or text is engaged from its beginning and tracked through to conclusion, chapters being the mile-markers.

      hmmm

    6. ‘I photograph to see what things look like photographed.

      photographs

    7. When I like how something looks, I take a photograph.

      I mean why would you otherwise? Do you take photographs of things you don't like? A professional photographer is a different case, but you get the point.

    8. But even more chilling is her observation that her own face looks at her. She does not see herself.

      we don't see back our life story, we look at it..

    9. Wisdom, said William James,Is learning what to overlook. And I am wiseIf that is wisdom.

      to Overlook is to learn? - can be connected to the notion of negative expertise by minsky

    10. No, there’s always a large measure of serendipity in the mix. Where are you reading? When? What time of day, or night? Who is with you? What are you drinking? Most importantly, what are you thinking, what are you going through? Why are you reading?

      pertinent questions

    11. I can’t remember a word of it, a sentence of it. A whiff of Paris, of young people, of jazz. But I remember it.

      so many things like this.. they are left like a faint memory, like a faded perfume still lingering like a ghost in the air as if it is almost not there while its wearer has long past gone that space which the traces of the perfume occupy now...

    12. the war photographer taking images of suffering and death without stepping into the fray

      Taleb would say - no skin in the game for the photographer

    13. The Creative Process (1985), edited by Brewster Ghiselin.

      A good reference

    1. A zero-percent body fat person may be in either a low or high quality body state depending on whether they are starving in the desert, or an athlete in training, with a well-stocked fridge.

      Hmm, it is subjective and subject to environmental aspects

    2. High-fat, high-excellence is high quality.

      operationally defining

    3. Fatness is embodied abundance. Or if you like clever lines: Fatness is future-fitness.

      fat is future-fit? this was perhaps indicated by some during the Bengal famine of the 1940s. Apparently many those who survived were the ones who were fatter than their less fortunate counterparts who perished

    4. Excellence is synonymous with quality only under behavioral regimes governed by an optimizing sensibility, operating on a closed and bounded notion of what the kids these days seem to be calling fitness-to-purpose.

      is it subjective then?

  5. Oct 2019
    1. When important events take place now, commercial news outlets instantly slice up the facts and commoditize them for consumption by their respective political demographics. We always had this process, to some degree, but it no longer takes days to sift into the op-ed pages.

      media these days, is the american one taking hints from indian one?

    1. Went was so often willing to consider what most scientists dismissed, and this permitted him to pioneer new fields of inquiry, rather than to move into fields opened up by others.

      hmm

    2. He also believed that photosynthesis does not control plant growth; rather, plant growth controls photosynthesis.

      this is an interesting point, what do others believe?

    1. “I may be right, I may even know that I am right, but I am never sufficiently ruthless and effective to force other people to believe that I am right and to act accordingly. All this was so unnecessary: it all could have been avoided if people had not thought that my objections were just theoretical and statistical and that they were practical people and need pay no attention to them.”

      aptly put

    1. “The butterfly, in effect, was therefore ‘invented’ by the bat,” she wrote.

      origin of butterflies

    2. But about 98 million years ago, some of them became active in the day, and gave rise to the butterflies—a group that Barber wryly describes as “an uninteresting diurnal group of moths.”

      the origin of butterflies

    1. Even more fundamentally, indigenous people were just too different: Their skin was dark. Their languages were foreign. And their world views and spiritual beliefs were beyond most white men’s comprehension. To settlers fearful that a loved one might become the next Mary Campbell, all this stoked racial hatred and paranoia, making it easy to paint indigenous peoples as pagan savages who must be killed in the name of civilization and Christianity.

      Us and them..

    1. The essential point is that genes are IFs rather than MUSTs.

      hmm, so there is a chance rather than certainity

    2. at heart they are merely specializations on a universal cellular theme.

      variations on the theme - form and function

    3. animal breeders know that shaping the bodies of animals often leads to correlated changes in behavior

      this one i need to know more

    4. he brain’s capabilities, like those of other organs, emerge from its physical properties.

      Thales principle

    5. brain is drastically different from other physical systems

      holy ghost

    6. Yet 2,000 years of thinking of the mind as independent from the body kept people from appreciating the significance of this seemingly obvious point.

      counter intuitive - from spirit and matter

    7. preformationism

      homunculi

    8. It is certainly true that the number of genes is tiny in comparison to the number of neurons, and that the developing brain is highly plastic. Nevertheless, nature—in the form of genes—has an enormous impact on the developing brain and mind.

      hmmm

    1. Although teacher quality certainly matters, most of the variance in student achievement is associated with factors outside the classroom.

      this is a rather strange remark..

    2. . The highly publicized "pay gap" that dominates news headlines is the product of a simplistic methodology that, when universally applied, suggests that nurses, firefighters, and other professionals are dramatically overpaid.

      another case of "intellctual phase lock"

    1. Never say that you’ll give a talk unless you know clearly what you’re going to talk about and more or less what you’re going to say.

      true that!

    2. It is very dangerous to have such a policy in teaching—to teach students only how to get certain results, rather than how to do an experiment with scientific integrity.

      yes this is exactly what happens, publish or perish

    3. Next time they try it they don’t get it any more.  And now you find a man saying that it is an irrelevant demand to expect a repeatable experiment.  This is science?

      problem of statistical significance being overrated in behavioral and educational research

    4. In fact, he discovered all the things you have to do to discover something about rats

      what is the equivalent for educational research?

    5. because there wouldn’t be any new result.

      isn't this assumed to be the case for all other experiments? would you go back to justifying every result you use in your experiments?

    6. it seems to have been the general policy then to not try to repeat psychological experiments, but only to change the conditions and see what happens.

      so with educational research as well. apples and oranges really

    7. If your answer happens to come out in the direction the government or the politicians like, they can use it as an argument in their favor; if it comes out the other way, they don’t publish it at all. 

      interesting in the context of present political scenario in India

    8. If you’re representing yourself as a scientist, then you should explain to the layman what you’re doing—and if they don’t want to support you under those circumstances, then that’s their decision.

      lot of programmes should be shut, they do not contribute anything significant to our knowledge

    9. We’ve learned those tricks nowadays, and now we don’t have that kind of a disease.

      the intellectual phase lock..

    10. Other experimenters will repeat your experiment and find out whether you were wrong or right. 

      and they might be disillusioned to get the result which is needed, only after a time has passed it might reveal the correctness and not at that time

    11. scientific integrity,

      how does one define this?

    12. then you must also put down all the facts that disagree with it, as well as those that agree with it. 

      but do even scientists do it all the time?

    13. For example, if you’re doing an experiment, you should report everything that you think might make it invalid

      this is a normative view of science

    14. So I call these things Cargo Cult Science, because they follow all the apparent precepts and forms of scientific investigation, but they’re missing something essential, because the planes don’t land.

      this is a good analogy

    15. So we really ought to look into theories that don’t work, and science that isn’t science.

      The problem is that many are driven by ideological commitments

    16. There are big schools of reading methods and mathematics methods, and so forth, but if you notice, you’ll see the reading scores keep going down—or hardly going up—in spite of the fact that we continually use these same people to improve the methods. 

      Much of the educational research would fit into this category of description

    1. Privacy does not mean stopping the flow of data; it means channeling it wisely and justly to serve societal ends and values and the individuals who are its subjects, particularly the vulnerable and the disadvantaged.

      hmm

    2. After all, those who know about us have power over us. They can deny us employment, deprive us of credit, restrict our movements, refuse us shelter, membership, or education, manipulate our thinking, suppress our autonomy, and limit our access to the good life.

      them

    3. Obfuscation assumes that the signal can be spotted in some way and adds a plethora of related, similar, and pertinent signals — a crowd which an individual can mix, mingle, and, if only for a short time, hide

      a defintion

    4. A life lived in social isolation means living far from centers of business and commerce, without access to many forms of credit, insurance, or other significant financial instruments, not to mention the minor inconveniences and disadvantages — long waits at road toll cash lines, higher prices at grocery stores, inferior seating on airline flights.

      a mendicants life

    5. But if we are nearly as observed and documented as any person in history, our situation is a prison that, although it has no walls, bars, or wardens, is difficult to escape.

      the post truth/democracy condition

    1. “These results together corroborate the idea that … nonhuman animals have a theory of mind and do not simply rely on behavior rules to interpret and anticipate others’ actions,” they write.

      hmmm

    1. Schoolchildren were simply told not to write in books. But this also has to do with a kind of post-romantic belief that the reader should be receptive rather than active—that the book should change us, rather than us changing the book. But if you look at earlier copies of printed books, it’s almost a kind of collaborative effort where the printed book is raw material that the user could make his or her own. This could even take the form of literally tearing apart the book and recycling the pages.

      about books

    2. What stands in the way of our reading great literature is almost never the medium; it’s almost always time. It’s about what other activities we need to give up in order to read.

      access vs. time. So much to read so little time

    3. One function of a history of reading is to serve as a corrective to nostalgia, for a path that was limited to a few decades.

      reading

    4. We kid ourselves if we think that the presence of printed books would magically make us more attentive and more focused.

      reading is more now? because of the access?

    5. One is the death of a particular kind of object that looks and feels and smells a certain way. And the other is a set of practices or activities, which that object has sometimes prompted.

      this is true for technology, the form and function, forms may change function perseveres

  6. Sep 2019
    1. Why not consider that plants have been doing the same for far longer than we have been around, with an intelligence that is radically different from ours?

      a deeper question perhaps? are we asking the right questions?

    2. Instead, they accost the viewer with nature’s power and its fragility.

      hmm, how would we otherwise see the narrative?

    3. Nearly every appeal to nature, however, evokes only a sense of alienation. The older people fawning over their favorite trees come off as fanatics with hyperniche interests, and the installations showing the human impact on the environment are so distressingly common that it’s difficult to engage with them as if for the first time.

      so true

    4. The common understanding of “intelligence” would have to be reimagined; and we’d have missed an entire universe of thought happening all around us.

      the definition is operational

    5. The idea of a “plant intelligence”—an intelligence that goes beyond adaptation and reaction and into the realm of active memory and decision-making—has been in the air since at least the early seventies.

      what is intelligence after all?

    6. “Trees do not have will or intention. They solve problems, but it’s all under hormonal control, and it all evolved through natural selection.”

      is having will or intention akin to having intelligence?

    1. The idea of a joint stock company was one of Tudor England’s most brilliant and revolutionary innovations.

      the start of corporate limited company

    1. With cancer we see uncontrolled cellular division and the spread of cancer cells throughout the body, and in depression we see the workings of neurotransmitters and how molecules affect mood.

      similarities, patterns...

    2. And while his first suicide attempt was about the fear of never finding love, his second fear, equally unwarranted, was that he was a complete failure as a provider.

      things others may not understand

    1. We are prone to see consciousness in puppets and other, even less likely objects.

      How does Turing test fare here

    2. Attention, therefore, is the name of the game for a visual predator.

      selection pressure?

    3. Insects are brainier than people think.

      hmm

    4. This signal enhancement is a direct consequence of neurons inhibiting their neighbors, a process called lateral inhibition.

      inhibition and selectiveexcitation

    5. A nerve net doesn’t process information—not in any meaningful sense

      Hmm, is there a threshold?

    6. 200 feet per second

      order of magnitude estimate

    1. there is a publication bias that favors papers that successfully reject the null hypothesis. Therefore, scholars have both substantial and practical incentives to prefer statistically significant results.

      So there is subjective reason

    2. here are situations where interpretation of the p value requires caution and we suggest four warnings: (1) scholars must always graphically analyze their data before interpreting the p value; (2) it is pointless to estimate the p value for non-random samples; (3) the p value is highly affected by the sample size, and (4) it is pointless to estimate the p value when dealing with data from population5.

      so how is it being used for non-randow samples? like in an experimental classroom?

    3. Statistical significance testing has involved more fantasy than fact.

      good quote to begin with

  7. Aug 2019
    1. What else is there? Sex and physics.

      bingo

    2. Einstein had this deep-seated need to be an outsider.

      parallel or against the flow?

    3. And it probably made him a little too cocky about the power of pure thought.

      rationalism much

    1. “What matters is how the parts affect each other, not what is inside them.”

      the functional aspect

    2. . Other construction materials will have their own basic components and ways to be put together. Most of the powerful ideas are in the designs of the combinations.

      the sum of parts

  8. Jul 2019
    1. The illusion had to be created that diamonds were forever -- "forever" in the sense that they should never be resold.

      and added to that movies which perpetuated this mythology

    2. Both women and men had to be made to perceive diamonds not as marketable precious stones but as an inseparable part of courtship and married life.

      Freudian principles at work?

    3. The diamond invention is far more than a monopoly for fixing diamond prices; it is a mechanism for converting tiny crystals of carbon into universally recognized tokens of wealth, power, and romance.

      selling by creating artificial value.. marketing at its best, tulip mania 2.0 ?

  9. Jun 2019
    1. This is just the same old story where top-down expectation meets incoming sensory signals with a balance that is determined by how confident you are in either the sensory signals or your top-down predictions.

      this is an interesting point to make about cognition and things that we know and can predict

    2. We very much expect, given a certain bit of face information, that the rest of that information will specify a convex, outward-looking face.

      connecting the dots, filling in the missing data

    3. The nature of intelligence looks very different when we think of it as a rolling process that is embedded in bodies or embedded in worlds. Processes like that give rise to real understandings of a structured world.

      can there be intelligence which is without form?

    4. how we can get something like a quantifiable grip on how neural processing weaves together with bodily processing weaves together with actions out there in the world.

      what sort of experiments will give us evidence for this ?

    1. Stories contrast with other forms of discourse, in other words, with other ways of organizing thought. There’s description, a state of affairs in space or time. Like a map or a schedule. Descriptions don’t have a prescribed order, a beginning, middle, and end. Explanations do. They also add causality. You start one place, something happens, and you end up somewhere else.

      what makes stories different?

    2. we could change your memory in real time by the perspective we gave you to recollect them.

      so memories can be relied on?

    3. Stories of course are another kind of structure the mind uses to organize events in time or place.

      this has good educational implications. any good learning will have good stories

    4. The brain doesn’t only predict what will happen next as we act in the world. It also stores information, puts stuff into categories and themes and hierarchies and more, often information that has no immediate use and may never have a use.

      a lot more happens than just the output which is observed

    5. one-bit thinking in a two-bit world.

      :) use it somewhere

    6. spatial thinking is the foundation of thought. Not the entire edifice, but the foundation.

      spatial thinking as the fundamental mode of thinking - both reality and abstraction

    7. Modes of perception and action also guide our mental as well as worldly representations of those spaces, how we think about them, how we think with them, how we communicate them.

      does it mean that certain actions will not be possible by people who lack those modes of perceptions?

    8. cognitive tools, like maps and abacuses and diagrams and sketches, but also gestures.

      what other cognitive tools are there

    9. I thought, what about faces? We recognize thousands of them in a split second but we are hard put to describe them precisely enough for others to pick them out. Spatial thinking is prior to language, I thought, both developmentally and evolutionarily. Spatial thinking must have its own logic, not necessarily that of language. If anything, language had to be built on spatial thinking, not the reverse.

      this is an interesting point indeed

    10. how or whether propositions could account for memory for the visual-spatial world.

      a question to ponder

    11. There’s aesthetics too. Some people like curves, others like lines.

      Hmm curvy

    12. categorical associations were more sophisticated than thematic ones.

      thematic may need a more basal approach

    13. If it’s in the brain, it must be real.

      this is an interesting way to define reality

    1. So many people today – and even professional scientists – seem to me like somebody who has seen thousands of trees but has never seen a forest. A knowledge of the historic and philosophical background gives that kind of independence from prejudices of his generation from which most scientists are suffering.

      a nice way to put it

    1. . A map is in its essence an analog device, using a picture to represent another picture.

      map is a meta-picture

  10. May 2019
    1. If a restaurant has a one-page menu that's usually a pretty good sign, it means their line cooks have become specialists and can usually nail all the dishes listed.Conversely, if a restaurant has a giant, multi-page menu that's a gigantic red flag. The longer the menu the better the odds that you're paying to eat a boiled bag frozen meal.

      pro tip really

    1. How could you communicate with the future?

      this becomes tricky as the present itself is unavailable to you

    2. To mark the paper was the decisive act.

      so will be to type a letter in the current era...

    3. BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU

      becomes easier with connected devices

    4. there was no way of shutting it off completely.

      same with social media and smart phones

    5. This was not illegal (nothing was illegal, since there were no longer any laws),

      neither are there any systems

    6. It was partly the unusual geography of the room

      hostile architecture

    1. It is an unbreakable cipher, yet it could be mastered by children.

      i want to make one

    2. Its inscriptions had the force of magic, but their meanings were not in themselves sacred.

      ,,

    3. The written word was a conduit of magical power, which could be harnessed for various ends.

      indeed it is

    4. Experts cannot even agree whether it is an alphabet, a syllabary, a mnemonic, or a rebus.

      so many types

    1. With the vacuum of verifiable information that the government has created on the matter, and all the rumor and speculation, one's truth compass begins to spin with reckless abandon as you dig into these issues.

      this seems to be the standard model under which they operate

    1. Art is always done within the constraints of a box.

      but does real art always follow rules

  11. Apr 2019
    1. But with the temptation of mistaking the familiar for the superior still etched into the mind, it is not beyond the human species to go to war over which country’s people carry out the most noble acts of random kindness.

      familiar is superior - this makes a lot of sense in the context of India

    2. You can’t reason people out of a stance they weren’t reasoned into in the first place.

      stance

    3. Nationalism is a product of human cognition, so cognition should be able to dismantle it, too.

      good point, it is social construct too

    4. At every turn, humans make automatic, value-laden judgments about social groups.

      this is happening all the time, whether we are conscious of it or not

  12. Jan 2019
    1.  but their main skill is capacity to pass exams written by people like them.

      this is the hallmark of modernity

  13. Aug 2018
    1. The attribution is empirically unconstrained.

      So there is no space for invisible entities.

    2. Loosely speaking, behaviorism is an attitude -- a way of conceiving of empirical constraints on psychological state attribution. Strictly speaking, behaviorism is a doctrine -- a way of doing psychological science itself.

      a broad understanding

  14. Jul 2018
    1. But is the classroom really where most of the serious learning occurs?

      Is classroom learning not natural?

    1. You prototype and iterate

      iterative design, helps to iron out the problems

    2. “game atoms,”

      The idea of hierarchical structure of games

    1. . Vision is not generally held by committees, and it has to be someone’s job to hold the vision.

      just as there is one person in the committee who matters

    2. hey are therefore a bit of a visual artist, a bit of a programmer, a bit of a logician and a bit of a philosopher, a bit of a psychologist and a bit of a manipulator.

      traits of a game designer

    3. Programmers are irrelevant to computer game design.

      Hmm. That is one premise to our course too.

    4. Explain why they disliked a film without being in the slightest capable of making one.

      What makes critiquing anything possible, even if we do not posses that skill to produce what is being criticised?

    5. It is absorbed by the intuition, not by the mind, and it is learned by doing. It is not taught.

      hence a practice based course is needed

    6. e. An artist’s name, or brand name, or company’s name, are only as good as their product.

      What about academics?

    7. ”how did he do that?”

      Do we become experts in the field once we are able to answer questions like these?

    8. There is no area of human endeavor which lacks antecedents

      We all look further by standing on the shoulders of giants...

    9. there are no arts that are not also crafts.

      Hmm. Can't think of any counter examples? But what exactly is a difference between the two?

    10. “The only legitimate use of a computer is to play games.”

      Of course :)

  15. Mar 2018
    1. To explain the mind, we have to show how minds are built from mindless stuff, from parts that are much smaller and simpler than anything we'd consider smart.

      This is already assuming there is no central control mechanism. Ghost in the shell, so to speak.

    1. Information is interpreted more easily and more uniformly if it is placed where most readers expect to find it.

      basic rule

    2. ince we read from left to right, we prefer the context on the left, where it can more effectively familiarize the reade

      also related to this is independent and dependent variables

    3. But, more significantly, the structure of the second table provides the reader with an easily perceived context (time) in which the significant piece of information (temperature) can be interpreted.

      context and framework for interpretation

    1. Why do people with “die-hard opinions” not know what they are talking about? Are the “experts” always right?

      Tyranny of the experts

    2. issues should be depoliticized as much as is feasible

      everything is political, science more so

    3. Intellectuals

      ?

    4. But Pinker largely fails to deal with the inconvenient fact that, at the time, it was not so obviously bad science.

      Hmm. Broca's Brain for example

    5. An average person of 1910, if he or she had entered a time machine and materialized today, would be borderline retarded by our standards.”

      Hmm, so by that logic have our scientists also have larger iq

    6. inequality matters less than actual levels of income and comfort

      How so?

    7. The Better Angels of Our Nature

      reading list

    1. ffspring were larger when their mother first mated with a male that had been well fed as a maggot, even if this male was not their father.

      can this be true for humans too?

    2. distinction between genetic and nongenetic variation

      NS is substrate independent

    1. “Instead, you’re expected to find some small problem, like students don’t understand historical chronology, so you might add a reading to address that. You’re supposed to make something up every semester, then write up a narrative”

      find a problem first, then a solution for that problem. and solution should be viable within the classroom, no polic level solutions acceptable

    2. Faced with outrage over the high cost of higher education, universities responded by encouraging expensive administrative bloat.

      The tyranny of testing is upon us!

    3. It was politically convenient to hold universities accountable for all this, rather than to scrutinize neoliberal austerity measures.

      After all it is universities where they come to learn, not to the policy makers

    4. “It has forced academic departments to use data that’s not very good,” he added. “And the process of getting this data that’s not very good can be very painful.”

      I think this is another symptom of the QWERTY effect described by Papert. People tend to think that something that is existing in the system, must be there for a good cause. It had perhaps a good cause, when it was initiated, but over time it has become redundant or is just an appendage.

    5. On many campuses, professors must include a list of skills-based “learning outcomes” on every syllabus and assess them throughout the semester.

      Continuous, comprehensive assessment anyone?

    6. But the ballooning assessment industry — including the tech companies and consulting firms that profit from assessment — is a symptom of higher education’s crisis, not a solution to it.

      Spot on. They are a solution looking for a problem to solve. We have this technology, ho can we sell this to you?

    7. quantifiable data that reveal what skills students are learning.

      wasn't this always required? that for many is the whole purpose of testing, and standardized testing particularly.

    1. Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?

      reading list

    2. Yuval Noah Harari in Sapiens (2011)

      Added to the reading list

    3. We lost our exclusive position in the animal kingdom, not because we overestimated ourselves, but because we underestimated our cousins.

      Anthropocentrism?

    1. digestive trac

      is this really contained on the fossils?

    2. If the custom emerged this early, it could explain a defining feature of our species: the increase in brain size that occurred around this time.

      is this any correlation with intelllgence?

    3. modern humans are biologically dependent on cooking.

      is this any correlation with intelllgence?

  16. Feb 2018
    1. Newton saw religious and philosophical truth as two almost wholly distinct entities, each to be pursued with its own methodology and rhetorical strategy

      isn't this true for many scientists?

    1. But the frustrated and humiliated intellectual, the rich and scared speculator, the spoiled son, the labor tyrant, the fellow who has achieved success by smelling out the wind of success—they would all go Nazi in a crisis.

      what are the Indian counterparts to these?

    2. “Why don’t you American in- tellectuals ever get to them; talk to them?”

      do intellectuals need to talk to proles?

    3. He is certainly an intellectual, but an intellectual smelling slightly of cow barns and damp tweeds.

      has a very different connotation in the cow-belt thought...

    4. Mr. G will never be a Nazi, because he will never be anything. His brain operates quite apart from the rest of his apparatus. He will certainly be able, however, fully to explain and apologize for Nazism if it ever comes along.

      is this the fate of intellectuals throughout?

    5. She will titillate with pleased excitement to the first popular hero who proclaims the basic subordination of women.

      the housewives