11 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2018
    1. Gardner’s theory has come under criticism from both psychologists and educators. These critics argue that Gardner’s definition of intelligence is too broad and that his eight different "intelligences" simply represent talents, personality traits, and abilities. Gardner’s theory also suffers from a lack of supporting empirical research.Despite this, the theory of multiple intelligences enjoys considerable popularity with educators. Many teachers utilize multiple intelligences in their teaching philosophies and work to integrate Gardner’s theory into the classroom.

      Criticism of Gardner's theory indicates that his idea of "intelligence" is too broad.

    1. words (linguistic intelligence) numbers or logic (logical-mathematical intelligence) pictures (spatial intelligence) music (musical intelligence) self-reflection (intrapersonal intelligence) a physical experience (bodily-kinesthetic intelligence) a social experience (interpersonal intelligence), and/or an experience in the natural world. (naturalist intelligence)

      The theory of multiple intelligences tells helps a teacher know how to teach anything in different ways based on a student's classifying intelligence.

    1. According to this theory, "we are all able to know the world through language, logical-mathematical analysis, spatial representation, musical thinking, the use of the body to solve problems or to make things, an understanding of other individuals, and an understanding of ourselves. Where individuals differ is in the strength of these intelligences - the so-called profile of intelligences -and in the ways in which such intelligences are invoked and combined to carry out different tasks, solve diverse problems, and progress in various domains."

      We all learn in specific ways and if we understand ourselves then we can combine the different domains that benefit our personality to complete certain tasks.

  2. Sep 2016
  3. May 2016
    1. In short, students would build a personal cyberinfrastructure, one they would continue to modify and extend throughout their college career — and beyond.
  4. Apr 2016
    1. "I want room for things that are not simply complying," he said. "I think it is important to encourage students to make connections — by that I mean hyperlinks on the web across the courses they are taking. The interaction is not defined as just the student interacting with the teacher, but the students as a community of learners indicating their interest and the relevance of what they are learning."
    1. networked discovery of connections would be at the center of both the learning environment as designed by faculty and the learning environment as experienced by students

      Would love to hear Campbell or Kuh elaborate on this. Identifying "connections" as more important than identifying content/information? A new way for searching the Internet? Mining connections among content/people? Mining the connections I've made among content/people on the Internet?

  5. Jan 2016
    1. Offering students the possibility of experiential learning in personal, interactive, networked computing—in all its gloriously messy varieties—provides the richest opportunity yet for integrative thinking within and beyond "schooling."

      Yes, yes, yes. Networked learning IS experiential. I am always on the lookout for opportunities to facilitate those experiences - for my students and myself, and consider every embrace of glorious messiness a significant victory.

    2. Go into your nearest college or university library. Ignore the computer stations and the digital affordances. Enter the stacks, and run your fingers along the spines of the books on the shelves. You're tracing nodes and connections. You're touching networked learning—slow-motion and erratic, to be sure, but solid and present and, truth to tell, thrilling.

      What a beautiful and evocative series of sentences!