35 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2017
    1. Central Committee man

      Dignity and Gender both. A man is put in charge to maintain order. Also, even through all that they've been through they still choose to elect a person of power to maintain their dignity throughout the situation.

  2. Mar 2016
    1. The rhizome itself assumes very diverse forms, from ramified surface extension in all directions to concretion into bulbs and tubers.

      Quote

    2. A system of this kind could be called a rhizome. A rhi-zome as subterranean stem is absolutely different from roots and radicles. Bulbs and tubers are rhizomes. Plants with roots or radicles may be rhizomorphic in other respects altogether: the question is whether plant life in its specificity is not entirely rhizomatic. Even some animals are, in their pack form. Rats are rhizomes.

      Definition of a rhizome

    3. As for the war machine in itself, it seems to be irreduc-ible to the State apparatus, to be outside its sovereignty and prior to its law: it comes from elsewhere.

      Food for thought

  3. Feb 2016
    1. a problem I hadlived but not labeled, so to speak.

      Beautiful

    2. longitude and latitude,

      I think these are Spinoza's terms

    3. ‘there’s nothing to explain, nothing to understand, nothing to interpret’

      YES! Stop looking for meaning!

    4. ‘Philosophy’s like a novel: you have to ask “What’s going tohappen?,” “What’s happened?

      Well, continental philosophy certainly. Analytic?

    5. ‘built upon the not-so-controversial ideathat how we conceive the world is relevant to how we live in it.’

      cf Wittgenstein

    6. is reading with love.

      Exactly

    7. So you will never get to the bottom of a concept like multiplicity, you will never beable to figure out what it really means, nor, if you become the least bit Deleuzian,will you want to

      There is no such as thing as what it really means"

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  4. Jan 2016
    1. D

      (human) existence. Heidegger rejected "being there" as an interpretation

    2. 01).Hedealswithithoweverbysuggestingthat“...ifchangeswhicharepresent-at-handhavebeenpositedempir-ically‘inme’,itisnecessarythatalongwiththesesomethingpermanentwhichispresent-at-handshouldbepositedempirically‘outsideofme’.Whatisthuspermanentistheconditionwhichmakesitpossibleforthechanges‘inme’tobepresent-at-hand.”(Heidegger1962p.248).

      This is, according to Heidegger, part of the "proof for the 'Dasein of things outside of me'"

    3. ideaofreflec-tionaspartofthemethodofaction.Thenotionof“being”positsthatthe“present-at-hand”and“ready-to-hand”objectsandconceptsareusedinourdailydecisionsandactions.

      I'm not convinced that the authors understand what these mean. Something which is "present-at-hand" is like a broken hammer - it comes to my attention because I can't use it. A hammer which is "ready-to-hand" is one I can pick up and use without paying attention to it.

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  5. May 2015
    1. ‘how does it work?

      Applying it, not necessarily being faithful to the original

    2. riting rhizomatically; understanding texts as rhizomatic; and analyzing the rhizomatic linkages between texts and the talk of the research participants.

      3 types of rhizo thought

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    1. We are in desperate need of new concepts, Deleuzian or otherwise, in this new educational environment that privileges a single positivist research model with its transcendent rationality and objectivity and accompanying concepts such as randomization, replicability, generalizability, bias, and so forth—one that has marginalized subjugated knowledges and done material harm at all levels of education, and one that many educators have resisted with some success for the last fifty years

      In Freirean terms, we need an alternative to the banking model of learning

    2. Todd May (1996) explains that Deleuze’s ontology is ‘built upon the not-so-controversial idea that how we conceive the world is relevant to how we live in it.’

      this is relevant to rhizo learning. We see knowledge as something we construct, not something that we are given by experts.

    3. Now you might ask what this discussion of subjectivity in Deleuze has to do with education and science, and I would respond—everything, everything. All of education and science is grounded in certain theories of the subject; and if the subject changes, everything else must as well

      We need a concept of the subject that's not grounded in positivism

    4. Rather than asking what a concept means, you will find yourself Deleuzian Concepts for Education: The subject undone 285 © 2004 Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia asking, ‘Does it work? what new thoughts does it make possible to think? what new emotions does it make possible to feel? what new sensations and perceptions does it open in the body?’ (Massumi, 1992, p. 8). You soon give up worrying about what Deleuze might have intended and use him in your own work ‘to free life from where it’s trapped, to trace lines of flight’ (Deleuze, 1990/1995, p. 141) into a different wa y of being in the world

      The philosopher, says Deleuze, creates concepts.

    5. permission to give up the pretense of signifying and ‘making meaning’ in the old way

      Don't try to understand it (e.g.D&G), If it does not speak to you, try something else.

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    1. Now you might ask what this discussion of subjectivity in Deleuze has to do with education and science, and I would respond—everything, everything. All of education and science is grounded in certain theories of the subject; and if the subject changes, everything else must as well.

      D has a different view of the subject from trad education

    2. haecceity

      Thisness

    3. One form of resistance to the scientism produced by the old values of government functionaries involves accomplishing scholarship that critiques those values and introduces concepts that upset the established order. This essay participates in that resistance, illustrating how Deleuzian concepts keep the field of play open, becoming, rhizomatic, with science springing up everywhere, unrecognizable according to the old rules, coming and going in the middle, ‘where things pick up speed’ (Deleuze & Guattari, 1980/1987, p. 25).

      D&G as a response to scientism

    4. We are in desperate need of new concepts, Deleuzian or otherwise, in this new educational environment that privileges a single positivist research model with its transcendent rationality and objectivity and accompanying concepts such as randomization, replicability, generalizability, bias, and so forth—one that has marginalized subjugated knowledges and done material harm at all levels of education, and one that many educators have resisted with some success for the last fifty years.

      In Freirean terms, we need an alternative to the banking model of learning

    5. Deleuze's ontology is ‘built upon the not-so-controversial idea that how we conceive the world is relevant to how we live in it

      this is relevant to rhizo learning. We see knowledge as something we construct, not something that we are given by experts.

    1. t can also be understood as an empirical version of Gilles Deleuze’s nomadic philosophy (Deleuze and Guattari 1988).

      YES!

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    1. Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari Intersecting Lives Francois Dosse; Translated by Deborah Glassman

      Review of biography of D&G