2 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2019
    1. Obscurity, verbosity, and pretentiousness are to be avoided; unusual words are to be used only when they aid clarity and prevent the aforementioned faults. For Aslell, women's rheloric should focus on the art of conversation, us both Sutherland and Renaissance scholar Jane Donawerth have argued. This is women's proper rhetori­cal sphere, different from but in no way inferior to the public sphere in which men use oratory.

      My mind immediately went to gossip and how the exchange/passing along of information/knowledge between women has been through this "proper rhetorical sphere" -- (private) conversations.

      The way obscurity is used here versus how it's used by Locke is also very interesting and very, very gendered.

  2. Oct 2013
    1. This doesn’t mean gossip is always good.

      I'm glad to see a statement that the results from this experiment in "procosial gossip" does not translate into meaning that gossip is always good.

      I wonder what insights we can take away from this and turn into action in our own environment?

      I feel the antidote we need is more meaningful and real-time feedback, not gossip.