9 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2019
    1. if to do thatis human, if that's what it tak§, tnen I am a human being after all. 'Fully, freely, gladly, for tneficst time.

      I have to bring up James Cone and Albert Camus again -- but this time I'm reminded of Camus' The Rebel) and this paragraph from Cone's Black Power and Black Theology: "The crucial question, then, for the black man, is 'How should I respond to a world which defines me as a nonperson?' That he is a person is beyond question, not debatable. But when he attempts to relate as a person, the world demands that he respond as a thing. In this existential absurdity, what should he do? Should he respond as he knows himself to be, or as the world defines him?" Rebellion is what Cone, Camus, and Le Guin decide to do when they redefine what it means to be a person, to be human.

  2. Apr 2017
    1. a rebellion a rebellion

      But rebellions themselves are dependent on viewpoint, as well. What might be called a "rebellion" by the rebels if they succeed might also be called a riot by the dominant forces should the rebellion fail.

      Rebellion definition: an act of violent or open resistance to an established government or ruler.

      Riot definition: a violent disturbance of the peace by a crowd.

  3. Sep 2016
    1. But if I don’t watch out for myself, who will?”

      The Guard didn't carry out Creon's orders because of loyalty to his ruler, but rather because his life was at stake. Creon is so concerned with stabilizing his power and making sure he is never crossed, demonstrated in how angered he was that Antigone, a woman, had disobeyed his decree. But, his own direct underlings show how they are not in blind loyalty to him but rather feel guilt and remorse for the actions they are forced to do and have motives of their own. Thus, the people of Thebes have shown that Creon's power is nothing more than a facade and that they all act in their own self interest. Ismene, Antigone, the Guard, and Haemon all demonstrated this imbalance in power by directly disobeying or disagreeing with Creon.

  4. Oct 2015
    1. V. Seven Years’ War

      Week 9 Video Lecture

      Study Questions for this week's reading in American Yawp:

      What tensions between France and England and the colonies did the Seven Years’s War reveal?

      What impact did England’s victory in the Seven Years'

      War have upon Native Americans? How was their relationship different with the French than it was with the English?

      How does England attempt to increasingly regulate and tax the colonies after the war?

    1. Signs of rebellion are everywhere: the unrest in China and India is chronic, civil wars rage in Africa, Latin America is in ferment.

      People aren't just unhappy for no reason.. are we taking into account everyone's response to these movements? I know not all societies are governed by a democracy, but it's still important to take into account how citizens will react to changes implemented by the government

  5. Sep 2015
  6. Feb 2014
    1. he sent messengers to Cyme demanding that Pactyes be surrendered.

      Mazares sends a message to the Cymeans to negotiate the return of Pactyes the rabble-rouser.

    2. But Pactyes, learning that an army sent against him was approaching, was frightened and fled to Cyme.

      1.157 Pactyes escapes to Cyme in order to avoid the wrath of Cyrus and the approaching Persian army. This vignette of conflict within the Achaemenids/Persians is still a long way from its conclusion.

    3. So Cyrus uttered his thought; but Croesus feared that he would destroy Sardis, and answered him thus:

      1.155 Cyrus consults Croesus on what he should do about the rebellion of Pactyes. Croesus gives a respectable and helpful answer but is still seen as looking after the well-being of his former dominion: Sardis. He doesn't want to see the city sacked.