1,601 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2019
    1. How to Be a Better Person

      Many philosophers throughout the centuries have preached the same thing that life is a journey and becoming better every day is a goal. As a general rule of thumb, most of us wish to become a better person. Unfortunately, many people become stuck and fixate on the mistakes they’ve made in life, preventing them from becoming a better version of themselves. Meanwhile, many others aren’t aware of how to go about bringing self-improvement. The good news is that it is possible for every human being on the planet to become a better person. Learning to love oneself is a skill, and much like any other skill, it can be learned. Take the example of an online essay writing service. No service becomes the best essay writing service without dedication and consistent practice. In a similar vein, no person can learn to be a better person without consistent and conscious efforts. Thankfully, thanks to thousands of years of human existence, we have other people’s experience to guide us towards the path to being a better person. Here are some tips that can help anyone become better versions of themselves. Compliment Yourself In our world full of comparisons and competition, it can be very easy to drown with self-pity and lack of self-esteem. This is further bolstered by the presence of social media in today’s society, where it seems like everyone is achieving success and living the best life. This is why it’s so important to be aware of one’s own good quality. Finding out the positives in yourself and complimenting yourself for it will allow you to break free from the mental shackles and adopt more positive habits. It also makes one happy and happiness, as we all know, is contagious. Don’t Make Excuses Making excuses or blaming someone else for mishaps or shortcomings is very easy. However, this leads nowhere. By accepting responsibility, owning mistakes and learning from them, one can grow in both personal and professional life. It breeds a sense of control over life, and ultimately makes one happier, which in turn makes one a better person. Let Go of Anger All of us go through different experiences in life. No one’s life is perfect, and there are bound to be negative experiences in everyone’s life. Human beings aren’t perfect; hence they tend to hurt others intentionally or intentionally. However, being angry at someone and not letting go of it only affects you. It casts a cloud over one’s judgement and decision-making ability. That is why it’s so important to let go of anger. Understanding that everything happens for a reason allows one to be content and focus efforts on other more important things. Practice Forgiveness This tip goes along with the last point. Forgiving others, as well as the self, is an incredibly elating experience. Forgiveness is one of the greatest forms of sacrifice. It requires sacrificing one’s ego, the greatest enemy to personal betterment and growth. Things like meditation and self-reflection can help a lot in this department.

  2. Sep 2019
  3. May 2019
  4. Jan 2019
  5. Nov 2018
    1. Duffy points to the increase in health care interactions online and adds that he would like to see a pervasive culture of in-person care as last resort. “If every organizational decision, technology decision, process decision — assuming all the payment stuff, that’s kind of ticket of entry, transpires — if you view in-person as last resort, that will help pull systems across the country to a more consumer-forward Uber-like experience,” he says

      Biggest challenges to redesigning the health care system in a way that would work better for patients and improve health

  6. Jan 2018
    1. Teddy Boffin

      In the manuscript, the first few times the name is corrected from 'Teddy." Dickens probably added the note below (Nicodemus. "Noddy Boffin") after he made the changes in the manuscript.

    2. Imaginary man.

      his "Imaginary man" could possibly refer to the "French gentleman" in Mr. Venus's shop, but it most likely refers to Mr. Venus himself, an imaginary version of the taxidermist Mr. Willis, to whom illustrator Marcus Stone took Dickens for inspiration (see note above). In a letter to Stone on Februrary 28, 1864, Dickens wrote: "I have done the St. Andrew Street place, and have made it the last Chapter of the 2nd. No. I will send you a proof when I get it. It is very like, with an imaginary man and an imaginary place in the story." The full text of this letter is available on the Our Mutual Friend Scholarly Pages (University of California Santa Cruz) at http://omf.ucsc.edu/dickens/letters/marcus-stone.html.

    3. In which Mr Wegg looks after himself

      Dickens told his illustrator Marcus Stone that “he had a personage who had just appeared upon the scene who was to have some eccentric calling, and that he could not find the calling that would suit him” (quoted in Michael Cotsell, The Companion to Our Mutual Friend [Allen & Unwin, 1986], 65). Stone took Dickens to see a taxidermist called Willis in Seven Dials in London, “an articulator of skeletons, a stuffer of birds, and dealer in bottled monsters.” "I suggested Mr. Willis, or rather his occupation, as an idea that might be suggestive," wrote Stone. "'It is the very thing that I want he said it couldn't be better.'" This real-life detour resulted in Mr. Venus’s appearance in the second installment. For more, see Michael Slater, Charles Dickens (New Haven: Yale UP, 2009), 524-25, and Francis Xavier Shea, "Mr. Venus Observed: The Plot Change in Our Mutual Friend," Papers on Language and Literature 4 (1968): 170–181, 170.

    4. Lady Tippins

      Lady Tippins does not appear in this installment number, but she does appear in the original chapter seven, which was relocated to the next installment as chapter ten.

  7. Oct 2017
  8. Sep 2017
    1. In which Mr Wegg looks after himself

      Dickens told his illustrator Marcus Stone that “he had a personage who had just appeared upon the scene who was to have some eccentric calling, and that he could not find the calling that would suit him” (quoted in Michael Cotsell, The Companion to Our Mutual Friend [Allen & Unwin, 1986], 65). Stone took Dickens to see a taxidermist called Willis in Seven Dials in London, “an articulator of skeletons, a stuffer of birds, and dealer in bottled monsters.” "I suggested Mr. Willis, or rather his occupation, as an idea that might be suggestive," wrote Stone. "'It is the very thing that I want he said it couldn't be better.'" This real-life detour resulted in Mr. Venus’s appearance in the second installment. For more, see Michael Slater, Charles Dickens (New Haven: Yale UP, 2009), 524-25, and Francis Xavier Shea, "Mr. Venus Observed: The Plot Change in Our Mutual Friend," Papers on Language and Literature 4 (1968): 170–181, 170.

    2. Lady Tippins

      Lady Tippins does not appear in this installment number, but she does appear in the original chapter seven, which was relocated to the next installment as chapter ten.

    3. Imaginary man

      his "Imaginary man" could possibly refer to the "French gentleman" in Mr. Venus's shop, but it most likely refers to Mr. Venus himself, an imaginary version of the taxidermist Mr. Willis, to whom illustrator Marcus Stone took Dickens for inspiration (see note above). In a letter to Stone on Februrary 28, 1864, Dickens wrote: "I have done the St. Andrew Street place, and have made it the last Chapter of the 2nd. No. I will send you a proof when I get it. It is very like, with an imaginary man and an imaginary place in the story." The full text of this letter is available on the Our Mutual Friend Scholarly Pages (University of California Santa Cruz) at http://omf.ucsc.edu/dickens/letters/marcus-stone.html.

  9. Jun 2017
  10. May 2017
    1. Yermak

      Vasiliy “Yermak” Timofeyevich Alenin was a Cossack who started the conquest of Siberia under the reign of Tsar Ivan the Terrible.

      Forsyth, James. A history of the peoples of Siberia: Russia's north Asian colony, 1581-1990. Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1992.

  11. Apr 2017
    1. Our jail infrastructure allows us to efficiently set up expensive resources a single time at startup, such as loading our trained models, then have these resources be cloned into a jail to satisfy a single OCR request. The resources are cloned Copy-on-Write into the forked jail and are read-only for how we use our models so it’s quite efficient and fast.
  12. Jan 2017
  13. Aug 2016
    1. VISITS

      I'm not sure exactly where this would fit in, but some way to reporting total service hours (per week or other time period) would be useful, esp as we start gauging traffic, volume, usage against number of service hours. In our reporting for the Univ of California, we have to report on services hours for all public service points.

      Likewise, it may be helpful to have a standard way to report staffing levels re: coverage of public service points? or in department? or who work on public services?

  14. Feb 2016
  15. Dec 2015
  16. Nov 2015
    1. Pelasgus

      pelasgus-bio-1

    2. Thetys

      thetys-bio-1

    3. Zeus

      zeus-bio-1

    4. Zeus

      zeus-bio-1

    5. Proserpina

      prosperina-bio-1

    6. Zeus

      zeus-bio-1

    7. Zeus

      zues-bio-1

    8. Diana

      diana-bio-1

    9. Ceres

      ceres-bio-1

    10. Polycletus

      polycletus-bio-1

    11. Euphorbus

      euphorbus-bio-1

    12. Poseidon

      poseidon-bio-1

    13. Zeus

      zeus-bio-1

    14. Jason

      jason-bio-1

    15. Heracles

      heracles-bio-1

    16. Horase

      horase-bio-1

    17. Hebe

      hebe-bio-1

    18. Ares

      ares-bio-1

    19. Aphrodite

      aphrodite-bio-1

    20. Hephaestus

      hephaestus-bio-1

    21. Hebe

      hebe-bio-1

    22. Ares

      ares-bio-1

    23. Zeus

      zeus-bio-1

    24. Aphrodite

      aphrodite-bio-1

    25. Zeus

      zeus-bio-1

    26. Athena

      athena-bio-1

    27. Poseidon

      poseidon-bio-1

    28. Zeus

      zeus-bio-1

    29. Zeus

      zeus-bio-1

    30. Zeus

      zeus-bio-1

    31. Zeus

      zeus-bio-1

    32. Zeus

      zeus-bio-1

    33. Zeus

      Zues-bio-1

    34. Acraea

      Acraea-bio-1

    35. Prosymna

      prosymna-bio-1

    36. Euboea

      Euboea-bio-1

    37. Temenus

      temenus-bio-1

    38. Cronos

      cronus-bio-1

    39. Zeus

      zeus-bio-1

    40. Cronos

      cronus-bio-1

    41. Zeus

      zeus-bio-1

    42. Zeus

      zeus-bio-1

    43. Oceanus

      oceanus-bio-1

    44. Zeus

      zeus-bio-1

    45. Cronos

      cronus-bio-1

    46. Hestia

      hestia-bio-1

    47. Rhea

      rhea-bio-1

    48. Cronos

      cronus-bio-1

    1. Lychnus

      lychnus-bio-1

    2. Zeus

      zeus-bio-1

    3. Teircsias

      teiresias-bio-1

    4. Athena

      athena-bio-1

    5. Paris

      paris-bio-1

    6. Apollo

      apollo-bio-1

    7. Apollo

      apollo-bio-1

    8. Hephaestus

      hephaestus-bio-1

    9. Hephaestus

      hephaestus-bio-1

    10. Zeus

      zeus-bio-1

    11. Hephaestus

      hephaestus-bio-1

    12. Poseidon

      poseidon-bio-1

    13. Eustathius

      eustathius-bio-1

    14. Locrian Ajax

      ajax-bio-1

    15. Cassandra

      cassandra-bio-1

    16. Suidas

      suidas-bio-1

    17. Athena

      athena-bio-1

    18. Pheidias.

      pheidias-bio-1

    19. Athena

      athena-bio-1

    20. Medusa

      medusa-bio-1

    21. Medusa

      medusa-bio-1

    22. Athena

      athena-bio-1

    23. Triton
    24. Zeus

      zeus-bio-1

    25. Athena

      athena-bio-1

    26. Athena

      athena-bio-1

    27. Athena

      athena-bio-1

    28. Athena

      athena-bio-1

    29. Athena

      athena-bio-1