21 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2021
  2. Mar 2021
    1. Sentry supports un-minifying JavaScript via Source Maps. This lets you view source code context obtained from stack traces in their original untransformed form, which is particularly useful for debugging minified code (e.g. UglifyJS), or transpiled code from a higher-level language (e.g. TypeScript, ES6).
    1. Any updates on this one? It makes debugging JS and CSS in the web inspector next to impossible when you can't get any help finding the offending code in your own source files.
  3. Feb 2021
    1. Source maps eliminate the need to serve these separate files. Instead, a special source map file can be read by the browser to help it understand how to unpack your assets. It "maps" the current, modified asset to its "source" so you can view the source when debugging. This way you can serve assets in development in the exact same way as in production.
    2. Source maps are a major new feature.
  4. Sep 2020
    1. (I promise you, this is the single biggest productivity boost to your CSS workflow. If you're writing styles without sourcemaps, you are almost certainly wasting a lot of time. I know I was.)
    1. But source maps have long been seen merely as a local development tool. Not something you ship to production, although people have also been doing that, such that live debugging would be easier. That in itself is a great reason to ship source maps.
    2. source maps are special files that connect that final output file the browser is actually using with the authored files that you actually work with and write code in on your file system.
    3. But because that final CSS file is probably minified (all whitespace removed), DevTools is likely to tell us that we’ll find the declaration we’re looking for on line 1! Unfortunate, and not helpful for development.
  5. Oct 2015
    1. Useful introduction to how source maps work. The code for Mozilla's source map library is very readable and an easy way to test this in practice.