823 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Apr 2021
    1. what's happening at the college level which is a bit different than at the university level

      Another important point. Our college-based network is leading some OER initiatives, these days. Partly because our needs are quite specific. Most of the OER scene focuses on universities (or merges colleges and universities, since they are very similar in some contexts).

    2. a French institution is kind of interested in terms of sharing materials and open educational materials because there's way less opportunities for us to work with publisher materials there's just not the same amount of resources out there

      One key hunch about differences between language communities.

    1. As part of a survey consultation of the UMSU membership, “adoption of free digital textbooks” arose as students’ highest-ranked priority for increased spending by the U of M, ahead of more than a dozen other options, including increased mental health supports and work-learn placements.

      Great to know that students have this as a priority!

  3. Mar 2021
    1. Celebrating

      Some OER creators may have skipped that important step. It's important to celebrate accomplishments, especially in “agile methodologies”. What makes it even more important with OERs is that promoting the work is an integral part of the work itself. Plus, a team which is able to celebrate its accomplishment is likely to lead to new accomplishments.

    1. I've also invited (that is assigned) students to participate in knowledge creation in the graph by adding content to fill "blank nodes" I've made as I've been inserting my content. They can choose which keywords or subtopics they want to learn a little more about, do a bit of research, write a summary that will be useful to their fellow students, and cite their sources.

      This exercise also makes it more apparent to students that their work and research can go on to make improvements to the field in general. Writing papers in college is a dreadful exercise for students who often don't see the point. While this may be like learning bowling with the gutter rails raised, it certainly helps bridge the gap many students may have.

      The added benefit is that they might see their work live on in a textbook they may have used and in which they now have a credit.

    2. In the next Learning Circle, I wrote a US History II textbook, adapted from The American Yawp. This was my first experience "Remixing" an existing CC-licensed OER. I think I took a step to making it my own and shifting its focus from what I considered a slightly consensus-driven and slightly political-correctness agenda to a more direct focus on some of the inequalities and injustices that the political correctness is belatedly trying to address. I think once I've reworked it one or two more times, using it in my courses and altering it gradually over a few semesters, it will probably be ready for publication as a "new" thing, although I'll continue to cite the original authors and point out that I'm in dialog with the previous work they did. I think this is how most textbooks are made, but like everything else, I want it to be very visible.

      This is an excellent example of an OER textbook being actively reimagined. I often see people writing about how it works, but haven't seen many cases of people writing about actively doing it.

    3. I hadn't really thought that much about the pedagogical aspects (they don't really teach PhD historians pedagogy where I went to school, or I missed it somehow, so I've been trying to educate myself since then).

      Don't feel bad, I don't think many (any?!) programs do this. It's a terrible disservice to academia.

      Examples of programs that do this would be fantastic to have. Or even an Open Education based course that covers some of this would be an awesome thing to see.

    4. I decided I'd make my content available with a CC BY-NC-SA (Attribution, Non-commercial, Share Alike) license, so that people could freely use and adapt my stuff, but would need to cite me as its source, make their content that was based on my work available for free, and slap a similar license on it. This is important, I think, to prevent the materials that educators make and contribute freely to the community STAY FREE. Without these stipulations (NC and SA), it would be possible for a commercial textbook company, for example, to grab the content I've created and add it to their "walled garden" of content which is technically free, but requires an expensive subscription to GET TO. This is a subversion of the Open idea which a lot of commercial publishers have tried, to reduce their cost of content and make themselves seem hip and up to date. The community calls it Openwashing.

      A good description of openwashing. I've seen some examples of the practice in the wild, but should make a note to document some.

    5. I began joining Minnesota State's OER Learning Circles, developed by Karen Pikula.

      This line is screaming out for some linked resources to follow up on.

      These look like good potential starts.

    6. Books had already been ordered and many of the students had purchased a $150 textbook and a $50 primary source companion. I adapted the lectures I had designed the previous semester, to align them with the new textbook I was using. As I was doing this, I had the opportunity to reflect on the ways that these textbooks were very similar in their skeletal structure, with really just a few details and stylistic differences. I became curious, and looked at several more Modern World textbooks, old and new. It occurred to me that I wasn't entirely happy, charging 75 students $200 each (that’s $15,000!) for textbook content that they would have paid $5 on, if the professor had chosen the previous edition of the textbook (assuming all the students could have FOUND one to buy).

      This! This is the piece of the puzzle that so very few teachers even bother to think about. Perhaps they're stuck with so much other work they either go with what they know, have used before, or are simply sold to them by textbook sales representatives.

      This pattern has concerned me for a long time.

      More:

    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>chrisaldrich</span> in From Print to OER Ebook to Obsidian (Hypothesis annotation) (<time class='dt-published'>03/15/2021 10:45:30</time>)</cite></small>

    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>chrisaldrich</span> in From Print to OER Ebook to Obsidian (Hypothesis annotation) (<time class='dt-published'>03/15/2021 10:45:30</time>)</cite></small>

  4. Feb 2021
    1. When your digital news feed doesn’t contain links, when it cannot be linked to, when it can’t be indexed, when you can’t copy a paragraph and paste it into another application: when this happens your news feed is not flawed or backwards looking or frustrating. It is broken.

      If your news feed doesn't contain links, can't be linked to, indexed, or copied and pasted, it is broken.

      How can this be tied into the five R's of Open Education Resources: Retain, Reuse, Revise, Remix and/or Redistribute content (and perhaps my Revise/Request update ideas: https://boffosocko.com/2018/08/30/the-sixth-r-of-open-educational-resources-oer/)

    1. Free, Open, Online: Rethinking Learning Materials Online (Slidecast)

      Packaging some of my early material on what we now call OER, Open Educational Resources.

    1. Free, Open, Flexible: Rethinking Learning Materials Online

      One of my early sessions on Open Education, with an emphasis on leveraging the material we create in the course of our work.

  5. Jan 2021
    1. Using wiki to create a learning community for chemistry teacher leaders

      Professors attitude to wikis and how opinions differ between demographics. Correlation between teachers' personal participation rate in the wiki environment and their perception of classrooms as student centered or teacher controlled

    1. Integration of open educational resources in undergraduate chemistry teaching – a mapping tool and lecturers' considerations

      evaluation of open educational resources, questionnaires and interviews of chem lecturers, lecturers interviewed tended to select OER intuitively, mainly considering the reliability of information, pedagogical issues and the visual contribution, while paying less attention to collaborative learning and content sharing.

  6. Nov 2020
    1. Start a class by outlining the syllabus or the chapters of the textbook. Professors who decide to write their text books as they go with the students. Publish the result as OER. It’d be fun to see some examples of that.

      Robin DeRosa did something like this that serves as a good example: https://robinderosa.net/uncategorized/my-open-textbook-pedagogy-and-practice/

  7. Oct 2020
    1. Perspectives:An Open Invitation to Cultural Anthropology2nd Edition The first peer-reviewed open access textbook for cultural anthropology courses. Produced by the Society for Anthropology in Community Colleges and available free of charge for use in any setting.
    1. As an example, Dr. Ng adapted this activity, originally written as an individual project, to a short in-class activity for teams

      Nice example of remixing an OER (via Lumen)

    1. Students like the convenience of the system, said Anderson, and all have access to the most up-to-date content, instead of some students having different editions of the same textbook.

      They're also touting the most up-to-date content here, when it's an open secret that for the majority of textbooks don't really change that much from edition to edition.

    2. A key difference between inclusive access and buying print textbooks is that students effectively lease the content for the duration of their course, rather than owning the material. If students want to download the content to access it beyond the duration of their course, there is often an additional fee.

      So now we need to revisit the calculation above and put this new piece of data into the model.

      Seriously?! It's now a "rental price"?

    3. She said that her institution, which has inclusive-access agreements with more than 25 publishers, had saved students more than $2 million this semester alone.

      $ 2million compared to what? To everyone having purchased the textbooks at going rates before? This is a false comparison because not everyone bought new in the first place. Many bought used, and many more still probably either pirated, borrowed from a friend, from the library, or simply went without.

    1. working in public, and asking students to work in public, is fraught with dangers and challenges.
    2. If OER is free, what hidden costs exist in its production? Making these textbooks is taking me a chunk of time in the off-season.  Thanks to my salaried position, I feel ok about putting in the overtime, but it’s a privilege my colleagues who teach under year-to-year part-time non-contracts can’t afford. Who should be funding OER creation? Institutions? Students? For-profit start-ups? How will you invest time in this project without obscuring the true costs of academic labor? Right now, we pass the corruptly high cost of academic publishing onto the backs of academia’s most vulnerable members: students. But as OER gains steam, we need to come up with funding models that don’t land us back in the same quagmire of exploitation that we were trying to get out of.

      This is a nearly perfect question and something to watch in the coming years.

    3. Most of the actual texts in the Heath were public domain texts, freely available and not under any copyright restrictions.  As the Heath produced new editions (of literature from roughly 1400-1800!), forcing students to buy new textbooks or be irritatingly out of sync with page numbers, and as students turned to rental markets that necessitated them giving their books back at the end of the semester, I began to look in earnest for an alternative.

      Repackaging public domain texts and charging a steep markup too much above and beyond the cost of the paper is just highway robbery. Unless a publisher is adding some actual annotative or analytical value, they shouldn't be charging outrageous prices for textbooks of this nature.

    1. Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial

      I'm gearing up my reading list for the holidays. I wanted to add An Urgency of Teachers: the Work of Critical Digital Pedagogy by Jesse Stommel and Sean Michael Morris. Seemingly I can only find .html, .azw3, and .pdf copies of the book, and I'd far prefer an .epub version. Fortunately the book has a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International license (CC BY-NC 4.0), so I've spent some time this morning to convert an original and made myself an .epub version for my Android devices.

      I'm happy to share it if others are looking for the same and don't have the ability (or frankly the time) to make the conversion. I also have a .mobi version (for Kindle) of the text as well since it didn't require much additional work. These are exact replicas with no changes and come with the same CC BY-NC 4.0 license. If Jesse or Sean want copies to make available on their site, I'm happy to send them along. 

      If you have the means, please be sure to make a donation to help support the book and Sean and Jesse's work.

      Originally posted at https://boffosocko.com/2019/12/19/alternate-formats-of-an-urgency-of-teachers-by-jesse-stommel-and-sean-michael-morris/

    1. Because students know their work will be used both by their peers and potentially by future generations of students, they invest in this work at a different level.

      I'm wondering if Greg McVerry stated something along these lines at the beginning of EDU522? I suspected he's planning something along these lines, but I'm unsure if it was stated specifically. Students should also know about creative commons and be actively opting in to creating this content as open while they're doing it. They also shouldn't be forced into opening it up, or if they do, not necessarily taking credit for it if they choose not to.

    2. Free to accessFree to reuseFree to reviseFree to remixFree to redistributeThe question becomes, then, what is the relationship between these additional capabilities and what we know about effective teaching and learning? How can we extend, revise, and remix our pedagogy based on these additional capabilities?

      I look at this and think immediatly about the Git model of allowing people to not only fork and reuse/redistribute pieces, but what about the ability to do pull requests to take improvements and push them back up the the source so that everyone potentially benefits?

    1. open pedagogy is currently a sort of proxy for the use and creation of open educational resources as opposed to being tied to a broader pedagogical objective.
    1. The current buzz about open pedagogy got kick-started in David Wiley’s 2013 blog post. Wiley defined open pedagogy as any approach or technique that would not be possible without the “5Rs” (at the time listed as the “4Rs plus free to access”: free to access, free to reuse, free to revise, free to remix, free to redistribute – the right to retain came later…) of OER.
    1. Publishers are eager to please state policymakers of both parties, during a challenging time for the business. Schools are transitioning to digital materials. And with the ease of internet research, many teachers say they prefer to curate their own primary-source materials online.

      Here's where OER textbooks might help to make some change. If free materials with less input from politicians and more input from educators were available. But then this pushes the onus down to a different level with different political aspirations. I have to think that taking the politicization of these decisions at a state level would have to help.

    1. The Task Annotation Project in Science (TAPS) provides K-12 educators with annotated assessment tasks, aligned to the Next Generation Science Standards, that help guide teachers in more equitably monitoring their students’ learning.37 Osmosis is a repository of open educational resources (OER) created to crowdsource the future of medical education.38 Undergraduate and graduate medical students have access to thousands of digital resources, and they have also used annotation - through comments, feedback forms, and ratings - to improve the quality of these learning materials.39 The National Science Digital Library (NSDL), created in 2000, is an archive of open access teaching and learning resources for learners of all ages across science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines.40 Annotation has been used to tag the NSDL’s resources and improve information accessibility, support student interaction with multimedia content through a digital notebook, and educators have annotated NSDL resources to design online learning activities for their students.41 And research about the digital annotation tool Perusall.d-undefined, .lh-undefined { background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2) !important; }.d-undefined, .lh-undefined { background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5) !important; }3Troy Hicks, Nate Angell, Jeremy Dean, often used in conjunction with science textbooks, has shown that college students’ pre-reading and annotation practices can subsequently improve exam performance.
  8. Sep 2020
    1. This study focuses on higher education instructors in the Global South, concentrating on those located in South America, Sub-Saharan Africa, and South and Southeast Asia. Based on a survey of 295 instructors at 28 higher education institutions (HEIs) in nine countries (Brazil, Chile, Colombia; Ghana, Kenya, South Africa; India, Indonesia, Malaysia), this research seeks to establish a baseline set of data for assessing OER use in these regions while attending to how such activity is differentiated across continental areas and associated countries. This is done by examining which variables – such as gender, age, technological access, digital literacy, etc. – seem to influence OER use rates, thereby allowing us to gauge which are the most important for instructors in their respective contexts.The two research questions that drive this study are:1. What proportion of instructors in the Global South have ever used OER?2. Which variables may account for different OER usage rates between respondents in the Global South?

      Survey, assessment, data and research analysis of OER use and impact in the global south

    1. This study is based on a quantitative research survey taken by 295 randomly selected instructors at 28 higher education institutions in nine countries (Brazil, Chile, Colombia; Ghana, Kenya, South Africa; India, Indonesia, Malaysia). The 30-question survey addressed the following themes: personal demographics, infrastructure access, institutional environment, instructor attitudes and open licensing. Survey responses were correlated for analysis with respondents’ answers to the key question of the survey: whether they had ever used OER or not.

      Effects and Use of OER in the global south. Survey, Statistics and data analysis presentation

    1. Commons and Merlot

      Commons and Merlot are awesome. Another good one is M.O.M - Mason OER Metafinder.

    2. use existing learning resources

      I love using existing resources, but I am always careful to use 'stable' resources that won't disappear after just a semester. Otherwise, I spend extra time fixing broken links and finding new resources.

  9. Aug 2020
    1. OER Policy Development Tool by Amanda Coolidge and Daniel DeMarte, Institute for Open Leadership Fellows. Licensed CC-BY 4.0 An interactive tool for institutional policy development. http://policy.lumenlearning.com/

      I thought this an absolutely great tool. It is helping me shape the policy for our university, and covers areas of OER development that I have not even considered yet. I believe this resource should really get a lot more prominence as a tool.

  10. Jul 2020
    1.  Teaching, Learning, and Sharing Openly Online 

      From embedded document: Importance of digital literacy grows for ALL learners

      OER are mainly under creative common licenses and are supposed to be reused or repurposed; teacher providing lesson plans/unit plans and other teachers can see these, take ideas, and make them their own

      Leads to a sort of collaborative learning experience for teachers, changing details to make the product the best it can be, assessing authentic learning, teaching, and assessment

    1. My surprise stems from the fact that the overlap between Scholarly Communication (often the support mechanism for Open Access [OA] initiatives around open publishing research) and Open Education (OE) is extensive

      Overlap between OA and OER

    2. third deductive theme coded for was whom the applicant would report to if hired. Of the twenty-four position descriptions analyzed, sixteen listed whom the applicant would report to directly. Four of the positions would report directly to the Library Director, Executive Director, or Associate University Librarian. The rest would report to the head of a department. Some of the departments included are Outreach & Instruction, Digital Scholarship, and Electronic Resources & Scholarly Communication

      Where to find OER/Library publishing

    3. maybe even coalesce into specific types of open education librarianship (for example, Open Education Outreach Librarian, Open Education Publishing Librarian, etc.)

      Great idea.

    4. deductive analysis (analysis tied to pre-defined questions)

      GREAT definition of deductive analysis. Thank you.

  11. May 2020
    1. annually:

      Look at this in context to see the breakdown.

    2. •Scholarly research and/or creative activity that extend and apply knowledge

      extends and applies knowledge

    3. at least the equivalent of five scholarly products within a five-year window

      minimum criteria

    4. Scholarly or creative work of high quality must be formally recognized by the faculty member’s peers to determine if it exerts influence in the discipline

      Peers "determine if it exerts influence in the discipline"

  12. Apr 2020
    1. There are many psychological, social, and institutional reasons why people don’t reuse stuff. But they are all academic questions until we solve the simpler problem: our software sucks at reuse. Like, if you had an evil plan to stop reuse and remix you would build exactly the software we have now. If you wanted to really slow down remix, you would build the World Wide Web as we know it now.
    2. Here’s how you currently reuse something in WordPress, for example. It’s a pretty horrific process. Log into the WordPress source site Open the file, go to the text editor. Select all the text, cntrl-c copy it. Go log into your target WordPress site Create a new page and name it. Go into the text editor, and paste the text in. Save Draft. Go back to the source site. Right click on the images in the post and download them. Go back to the target site. Open the Media Gallery and upload the images you just downloaded. Go through you new post on the target site, and replace the links pointing to the old images with links pointing to the images you just uploaded. Preview the site, do any final cleanup. Resize images if necessary. Check to make sure you didn’t pull in any weird styles that didn’t transfer (Damn you mso-!) Save and post. You’re done! Oh wait, you’re not done. Go to the source post and copy the URL. Try to find the author’s name on the page and remember it. Go to the bottom of your new “target” page and add attribution “Original Text by Jane Doe”. Select Jane Doe and paste in the hyperlink. Test the link. Now you’re REALLY done! It’s about an five to ten minute process per page, depending on the number of images that have to be ported.

      One of the things I love about the idea of using TiddlyWiki for OER. Drag, drop, done!

      Of course it would be nice if the metadata fields of Tiddlers included links to the permalinks of the original as well as their Creative Commons license.

    1. The purpose of recording and organising information is so that it can be used again. The value of recorded information is directly proportional to the ease with which it can be re-used.The philosophy of tiddlers is that we maximise the possibilities for re-use by slicing information up into the smallest semantically meaningful units with rich modelling of relationships between them. Then we use aggregation and composition to weave the fragments together to present narrative stories.TiddlyWiki aspires to provide an algebra for tiddlers, a concise way of expressing and exploring the relationships between items of information.

      This also seems like a great underlying philosophy for open educational resources.

  13. Mar 2020
    1. https://guides.library.utoronto.ca/c.php?g=448614&p=3199145

      Librarians are masters at finding material and checking copyright. This is what we do and what we've done for years but most of us really don't have an understanding of what is OER and how it can be used. As librarians continue to be in forefront of this movement, we need to be educated with language we understand so we can interpret it to those we serve. This source gives an indepth interpretation in librarian-understandable language

    1. el nacimiento de verdaderas comunidades de práctica de docentes que comparten recursos educativos digitales de libre acceso y uso ha sido tan impredecible que ya se habla de un movimiento. La filosofía es muy parecida a la que vio nacer el software de código abierto: todos ganan si los recursos existentes se mejoran sucesivamente gracias al intercambio constante

      La infraestructura tecnológica requiere de contenidos y no se esta en la capacidad de crear todos los que se requieren, ni en todos los casos esta la opción de comprar.

    1. OER Commons is a public digital library of open educational resources. Explore, create, and collaborate with educators around the world to improve curriculum.

      This Open Educational Resource page hosts free resources from educators who work with preschool children all the way through graduate and professional level adult learners. In addition to full classroom activities, the site includes many mini-activities and continued learning resources that instructors can include in their daily instructional practice. Although it would certainly require an investment of time on the part of an educator, one of the primary reasons technology integration is not considered, this site does provide the means by which educators may begin to consider including technology in their curriculum to the benefit of their students. Ranking: 8/10

    1. MERLOT Materials

      Started in 1997 by the University of California Center for Distributed Learning, this website offers free, peer reviewed, digital learning resources for learners as young as preschool to adult learners in graduate or professional learning programs. Educators can use a general search tool or a filter to find open resource learning material with a peer/editor review and often a user review. This is a very practical, although somewhat overwhelming, approach to putting digitally-designed learning materials into the hands of educators of all ages. Ranking: 9/10

    1. ntegrating Technology in Learning

      This website offers a host of resources for youth and adult educators who are looking for new ways to incorporate technology into their educational environment. The website stores featured projects that support technology integration, resources that educators can use to inform their own practice, and short articles on a variety of topics for youth and adult learners as well as professional development programs. Ranking: 7/10

    1. How do you feel about writing in books?

      We welcome you to share your own answers to this question! (Opens in new window.)

      Below are participant responses to the survey questions.

      Click the "more" button at the bottom right corner of this annotation to see additional survey responses. You can also [view the results in a larger page] (https://wisc.pb.unizin.org/wiwgrangerized/back-matter/poll-results/). (Opens in new window)

      If you see error messages in the frames below, try opening this text in another browser.

      <iframe src="https://wisc.pb.unizin.org/wiwgrangerized/wp-admin/admin-ajax.php?action=h5p_embed&id=18" width="958" height="790" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe><script src="https://wisc.pb.unizin.org/app/plugins/h5p/h5p-php-library/js/h5p-resizer.js" charset="UTF-8"></script>

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  14. Feb 2020
  15. Jan 2020
    1. Black artists and cultural leaders have been compiling documents of this sort since the 1700s, first as part of an ongoing argument against White supremacy and slavery. Later, during Reconstruction, as a reminder to the newly literate Black population “that they were not alone.” Later still, to catalog the abundance of the Harlem Renaissance

      I'd love to have copies of these lists. Or perhaps even an anthology of works that appear on them?

      Perhaps it would be useful to publish an entire series of these works under a bigger banner? Perhaps an OER edition that could be shared?

  16. Dec 2019
    1. Further Research (in html)

      • Distribute a survey to library workers to elicit criteria for OA content selection, including quality measures and financial workflow components.
      • Research appropriate levels of collective action — local, state, regional, national, international? What is the tipping point between large enough to exert market force and too large to manage? What is the role of consortia in leading collective action efforts?
      • Propose and test innovative staffing and workflow changes to meet the needs of an open environment.
      • Research the power and agency of the library community with respect to OA content support: ○ Would community criteria, decision-making, or vetting be widely adopted? ○ How is best to consider needs in relation to the diversity of institutional participants and scale of effort? ○ How can the community leverage market power in an equitable and ethical way?
      • Create generous spaces and build a common vocabulary, within the library profession and with content providers.
      • Expand conversations about these topics to include other stakeholders (OA providers, consortia, agencies, societies, faculty and scholars, administrators, etc.)
      • Explore the connection between OER and OA programs. Are there ways to use the momentum from OER programs to develop stronger OA content platforms or services?
  17. Nov 2019
    1. this commercial publisher

      Notice that once they changed the business model they ceased being productive.

    2. Because you didn’t change the instructional design of the book in any way

      But by changing the license you now enable the book to be remixed and adapted to the needs of the students: an open license enables open pedagogy.

    3. I see four groups who are trying to use OER to solve closely related – but ultimately very different – problems: The negative impact on access to education caused by the high price of traditional learning materials The negative impact on student success caused by limitations in the traditional publishing model The negative impact on pedagogy caused by copyright-related constraints inherent in traditional learning materials The negative impact on students caused by a wide range of behaviors related to the business models of traditional publishers (If you use OER and don’t see yourself in one of these groups, what problem are you trying to solve by using OER?)
    1. Wiley’s (2013) notion of “renewable assignments,”

      I thought the term "renewable" as opposed to "disposable" came up later. The word "renewable" does not appear in David's 2013 blog post cited here.

    2. We define OER-enabled pedagogy as the set of teaching and learning practices that are only possible or practical in the context of the 5R permissions which are characteristic of OER.

      Definition of "OER enabled pedagogy".

    3. Those interested in OER care about the way the word “open” is used in educational contexts.

      Sure. And others also care about the way open is used in educational contexts beyond OER, to mean more than just specific copyright statuses.

    1. A large part of the ‘resources’ conversation in OER is this kind of problem. Cheaper access to books. More people using books. Nice measurable problems that can be fixed.

      Lowering costs for learning materials via OER: A complicated problem vs what Dave calls complex problems, like open pedagogies.

    1. It’s a turbulent time for the college textbook industry. Low student enrollment, tight company budgets and changing business plans have hampered growth at major educational publishers such as Pearson, Cengage and McGraw-Hill Education.

      The Inside Higher ED provides resources on news, adult learning, and technology advances. They provide information on online learning environments. This is deemed useful as online education is becoming popular. One of the articles I found was the alternative to textbooks. Publishers are jumping on board to creating custom textbooks at lower prices. The market is changing and moving to open educational resources. Publishers plan to invest more in their digital courseware. 3/5

    1. Of course the Open Education conference is just an open education conference and it certainly isn’t the only place to have these conversations. Regional events such as the Northeast OER Summit, the Cascadia Open Education Summit, Wisconsin’s E-ffordability Summit, the Statewide Colorado OER conference and others are wonderful options. Further afield, the OER conference and the Open Education Global conference are both events that welcome critical conversations. As do other events like Digital Pedagogy Lab and the many virtual conference hallway conversations facilitated by Virtually Connecting.

      Nice list of open education and OER related conferences and communities.

    1. CARE Framework

      Thanks to @mkcow below for providing a direct link to the CARE Framework.

  18. Oct 2019
    1. “When we call anything “open” we need to clarify: What are we opening, how are we opening it, for whom, and why?”

      Good and necessary questions

    1. money

      Whose money? Important to determine whether the student or the institution is the winner here. Are we increasing access to high quality resources? I think the answer is yes, but I think it also bears thinking about.

      Another type of savings to consider: the technical debt that students of all ages incur when they encounter a new technology that may or may not be well supported. If OER is trapped inside proprietary technologies with unique logins, it's worth considering how many of those resources we ask students to grapple with over the course of a degree.

    2. make the teaching and learning problems caused by copyright the core issue we are solving with OER

      I still wonder to what degree open educational practices are necessarily or always tied to copyright. That is, can OEP be implemented on copyrighted texts?

    3. Project Management for Instructional Designers

      Ironically this book is licensed "non-commercial." I personally like that license but after years of folks arguing against that license, I would love to hear the rationale behind it.

    1. I launched the open textbook project over a summer, and because I teach at a public university where I had no easy access to graduate assistants or funding,

      I think that this is one of the biggest barrier for changing course materials; if our institutions are not supplying incentives to faculty, what are creative ways to effectively promote OER to faculty?

    1. Cengage’s own research forecast that the use of OER as primary courseware was poised to triple within five years.

      Useful info, which I'm not above using.

    1. a range of business models

      I think Hypothes.is plays a very important role in democratising these discussions. The real places where these decisions are made are often closed off to faculty and students. We need to have serious discussions about which sustainability models are appropriate for education not just the businesses. What is sustainable for education may not always be sustainable for business!

  19. Sep 2019
    1. Notably, several of the catalysts identified by participants were not directly related to an awareness of OER or open textbooks. Several of these catalysts are related to innovation, learner empowerment, and increasing access to knowledge more generally. While these individuals identified as open education practitioners, they did not necessarily cite OER as their starting point for integrating openness in teaching and learning.

      This is an interesting conclusion as it has oft been stated that OER are a gateway to OEP. While that appears to be the case for 3 of the participants, for the rest it appears that OER was not the starting point to OEP. What bears deeper investigation is whether the second or third step to OEP was OER. Reminds me of a blog post I wrote a few years back wondering if OEP required OER http://clintlalonde.net/2017/02/04/does-open-pedagogy-require-oer/

    2. There is a growing need to establish literacies around open education, copyright, social media and networked learning as a foundational skill.

      Among both students AND instructors. Instructors teach what they know, and if they do not feel comfortable themselves working in these environments b/c they lack digital skills, then they will not encourage students to work openly.

    3. Thomas further commented “it’s openness in what we bring into the classroom, openness in what we take out of the classroom, and an openness between what happens between the students and myself and the students and each other in how we organise the classroom.”

      Great quote

    4. Alice noted her feeling that the use and sharing of OER were one of the “less threatening” components of OEP.

      This is an important change in perception that has occurred in the past 10-15 years of OER. OER's used to be met with much skepticism by faculty. It is nice to see that these are now becoming "less threatening" and, by extension, more accessible.

    1. One notable barrier that has prevented faculty from adopting OER is concerns about the quality of the materials. The present study extends upon a growing body of research indicating that OER are not perceived to be lower in quality than traditional textbooks.

      I have trouble believing many faculty members will be swayed by undergraduate students' perceptions of quality. There's a difference to be explored in "quality of disciplinary content in the abstract" vs. "quality as a study aid for this particular course."

      This is of course a broader concern for advocacy for OERs, not a critique of this particular study.

    2. One reason why the students assigned open textbooks may use those textbooks more is that they perceive a greater need for/relevance of their textbook relative to those assigned traditional textbooks

      The absence of the teacher here seems like an issue. To what extent may the students have come up with that perception on their own, or might they perceive it because the teacher told them about the work involved in vetting this particular textbook? What, if anything, did the traditional textbook teachers say?

      (Further down the paragraph it's made clear that the OERs were adapted to be more relevant, which I agree is part of the attraction of OERs and including that is fair. But I'd still like to know what the teachers said in class about it, if anything.)

    3. and students assigned an open textbook reported a significantly higher percentage of underutilized textbooks (M = 52.20, SE = 1.38) than those assigned a traditional textbook (M = 48.44, SE = 1.21)

      Students who have been primed with the knowledge that this course uses a lower-cost OER text are more critical of textbook price vs use in other courses?

  20. Jul 2019
    1. “My professor shows us slides, but, um, the book is not used at all, and that’s a book that I bought for $200, and that, even though I’m not using it the price is going to go down. I mean, it’s unwrapped, so that right there takes away its value.” — 2nd year student at Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY

      To me the vast part of the problem is that students assume a "required" textbook is actually required. It doesn't take much work or thought after even the first semester of Freshman year to realize this fallacy. Students need to learn the fine art of choosing their own textbooks. More on this: https://boffosocko.com/2011/07/30/on-choosing-your-own-textbooks/

    2. My professor shows us slides, but, um, the book is not used at all

      The student's description of the course reminds me that conversations about OER go hand-in-hand with conversations about pedagogy. How does adopting and (co)creating OER texts affect the how's and why's of teaching and learning? And for instructors (and students) new to OER, how can they receive support before, during, and after the use/creation of an OER text?

    1. Open Education Resources OER are teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license permitting their free use or re-purposing by others Much of the challenge in identifying ownership is due to the fact that it is hard to differentiate between who is the user and who is the producer when it comes to open learning in the classroom.

    2. Open learning, also known as open education

      requires a open, sharing, collaborative environment. Promotes pedagogical dialogue. OER have potential to transcend "geographic, economic, or language barriers". Also, OER strengthens digital literacy.

    1. 1)

      As I reflect on how instructors and students might co-create an OER text, I see questions like this, generated by the instructor/author, as an opportunity to establish and explore essential questions together. After brainstorming these questions, a possible next step would challenge students to write their own chapter (or other unit) in response to this question.

  21. Jun 2019
    1. I love the way you're thinking about design and pedagogy here. It makes me want to think more about possibilities for such design...I'm wondering what the startup effort would be for many teachers...

    2. Elsewhere, I use GitHub to facilitate multi-stage written assignments. Students are asked to revise an earlier written assignment, responding to instructor feedback, and to create a record of their revisions in their commit history to the earlier submitted document.

      This is an interesting idea. I've done similar things with Juxta, but I can see how Github would be a great tool for this...how much effort goes into teaching the tool?

    3. There is no lesson plan or outline we must read in order to enact an educational experience; instead, the website lets us have an educational experience right away and then lends itself to a series of follow-up questions, exercises, and reflective practices. Otherwise put, the website actively facilitates a pedagogical experience rather than providing access to pedagogical documents. There is no set up required.

      This is an interesting comment. I'm struck by the notion that the site enacts the learning process rather than provides materials. I'm also wondering how this might fit into the "open education" ethos.

  22. May 2019
    1. Despite popular rhetoric along the lines of “you can’t learn from materials you can’t afford,” their rather ingenious experiment showed that increasing access to learning materials by adopting OER instead of traditionally copyrighted resources (TCM) will almost never measurably improve learning. Learning will only improve measurably if you ALSO do something else.

      OMG YES!!!!!

    2. This was justified by the fact that there is a lack of empirical evidence to support expanding the use of OER.
    1. We need to emphasize program consolidation where appropriate, in order to direct more resources to high-demand programs such as computer science and education.  In addition, the Board’s Open Education Resources initiative will provide textbooks for certain courses at little or no cost.

      Ease tuition hike with free textbooks?

  23. Apr 2019
    1. The example of the Linux kernel shows that this is completely possible.

      I think the Linux kernel analogy breaks down even more in considering "the other 93%" of educational content, which David has already identified here as more niche, less kernelesque, than content for core courses. Seems to me, the more specialized and rarely used something is — either in digital technology or in content — the less likely it is going to be the focus of widespread, shared activity.

      If commercial publishers could rely on OER content for core classes and generate revenue from wrapping them in additional services (as David describes here), what is their incentive to devote any resources to labor-intensive, niche content that would have far lower revenue margins?

    2. Traditional textbook content like words and images are just like the operating system kernel – kind of boring.

      This is the part of the argument here I don't find convincing. I'm not sure we can liken content — yes even "traditional textbook content" — to OS kernels or roads as a kind of "boring" infrastructure. Content is an expression of knowledges/understandings right? If anything, content seems more like the "interesting" part that relies on the kernels/roads.

      Yet I am interested in the idea of thinking of content as PUBLIC infrastructure, in the sense that like roads, we have common interests in securing public sources for the resources necessary to produce and maintain educational content.

  24. Mar 2019
    1. We refer to this idea as the access hypothesis.

      In thinking about the questions I’m raising in my presentation at OLC Innovate 2019, let's start by asking the question whether we think the "access hypothesis" is a significant component in measuring the impact of OER on student learning?

    1. But often — and maybe even usually — when we complain about the cost of books, we’re complaining about the cost of supplemental media, password-protected websites, and other items that may include text but are certainly not books.

      And at the same time, OER’s lack of such ancillary materials is often blamed for its slow adoption.

    2. By teaching students to expect that books ought to be free, we are teaching them to be bad citizens.

      Point taken. Maybe the lesson is not about the price of books, but who should pay for them. A lot of course materials are produced in factory-like conditions by underpaid creators who have no intellectual property rights in the works they produce.

    3. a holdover

      I love the word for these types of anachronisms: skeumorph.