891 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. focus on collaboration, connection, diversity, democracy, and critical assessments of educational tools and structures

      Also critical assessments of authority structures, truth claims, value judgments...

    1. free of charge and free of licensing restrictions

      Are there any examples currently where something is not free of charge but is free of licensing restrictions?

    1. Faculty members are increasingly interested in open access publication models. Approximately 64%

      Growing dissatisfaction with a subscription-based publication model with "scholarly research outputs" freely available to public.

  2. Apr 2019
    1. A Vision for Scholarly Communication Currently, there is a strong push to address the apparent deficits of the scholarly communication system. Open Science has the potential to change the production and dissemination of scholarly knowledge for the better, but there is no commonly shared vision that describes the system that we want to create.

      A Vision for Scholarly Communication

    1. So in theory, one could imagine an organization that produces a different kind of document. Instead of a license for the source code, they would provide a way to say uh, let’s go with “Open Development Certified.” Projects could then submit for certification, they’d get accepted or rejected.

      This sounds a lot like the Apache trademark, to me.

    1. About 98% of the research published in the Journal since 2000 is free and open to the public. Research of immediate importance to global health is made freely accessible upon publication; other research articles become freely accessible after 6 months.

      98%?!?!?! Data please!

  3. Mar 2019
    1. The main purpose of the Discovery IN is to provide interfaces and other user-facing services for data discovery across disciplines. We explore new and innovative ways of enabling discovery, including visualizations, recommender systems, semantics, content mining, annotation, and responsible metrics. We apply user involvement and participatory design to increase usability and usefulness of the solutions. We go beyond academia, involving users from all stakeholders of research data. We create FAIR and open infrastructures, following the FAIR principles complemented by the principles of open source, open data, and open content, thus enabling reuse of interfaces and user-facing services and continued innovation. Our main objectives are:
  4. www.archivogeneral.gov.co www.archivogeneral.gov.co
    1. Normalización de las entradas descriptivas: Personas, Lugares, Instituciones (utilización de Linked Open Data (LOD) cuando sea posible.

      ¿Qué sistema de organización de conocimiento se los posibilita? ¿Qué están usando para enlazar datos y en qué formato?

    1. Engaging the Public Through Wikipedia: Strategies and Tools Show affiliations

      Engaging the Public Through Wikipedia: Strategies and Tools

    1. There is a serious crisis of discoverability. To overcome it, we have to tear down the walls of dark knowledge and invest in the open discovery infrastructure, esp. user interfaces.

    1. Open science is the movement to make scientific research, data and dissemination accessible to all levels of an inquiring society.

      lavaylanda

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      ciencia abierta

    1. Open Access publishing and Open Science MENU

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    1. Center for Open Science

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    1. Open Science MOOC

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    1. Open Science Directory

      lavaylanda

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      base de datos

    1. October 21 - 27, 2019

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      RSS

    1. How open science helps researchers succeed

      lavaylanda

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      DOI:10.7554/eLife.16800 PMCID: PMC4973366 PMID: 27387362 OA

    1. Open Science Grid About News Contact

      lavaylanda

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      ciencia abierta

    1. Open Science Prize

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    1. Open Science Manifesto

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    1. Festival de la ciencia abierta y participativa

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    1. Open Science Days

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    1. Open Research Facilitating faster and more effective research discovery

      lavaylanda

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  5. Feb 2019
    1. Open-Access Efforts

      George Cham, the author/illustrator behind PhD Comics, created a visual explainer video that unpacks the rationale behind open access: <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/L5rVH1KGBCY" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    1. Research methodologies and methods used must be open for full discussion and review by peers and stakeholders.

      So does this mean totally open? As in publish your protocols open?

    1. Ideally, an open pedagogy project explicitly welcomes future participation and adaptation (Robbins, “Guidelines”).

      Timothy Robbins emphasizes this goal in his guidelines for contributors to the latest Rebus Community iteration of the Open Anthology of Earlier American Literature. In a distillation I find particularly elegant, he notes: "In its best iteration, “open pedagogy” entails the spread of access to knowledge with an invitation to participate in the re-creation of new knowledge" ("Guidelines: Section Introductions.") 

    2. it is also the process of designing architectures and using tools for learning that enable students to shape the public knowledge commons of which they are a part

      Rajiv Jhangiani connects this point both to the 2008 Cape Town Open Education Declaration's outline of open pedagogy and to UNESCO's UNESCO’s Education for Sustainable Development Goals (or ESD), which he excerpts in more detail in his presentation:

      “ESD does not only integrate contents such as climate change, poverty and sustainable consumption into the curriculum… It asks for an action-oriented, transformative pedagogy, which supports self-directed learning, participation and collaboration, problem-orientation, inter- and transdisciplinarity and the linking of formal and informal learning. Only such pedagogical approaches make possible the development of the key competencies needed for promoting sustainable development.”

      Jhangiani, Rajiv. "Open Educational Practices in Services of the Sustainable Development Goals." Open Con, United Nations Headquarters, New York, 2018. Recording and transcript; Permalink.

    1. how would our education system change to take advantage of this new external symbol-manipulation capability of students and teachers (and administrators)?

      Let's say it's been twenty years since PDAs have been widely available. I returned to higher education less than ten years ago. K-12 seems to have embraced learning technologies, and their affordances, to improve primary and secondary education. In my experience, few educators with terminal degrees have made the effort while younger and more precarious teachers are slowly adopting educational technologies. Administrators are leading the way with their digital management systems and students are using proprietary social media platforms. Our institutions are doing what they were designed to do: resist change and reproduce the social order. Research paid for with public monies is as quickly privatized as that produced in corporations. Open education practices are just beginning to be explored.

      The first PDA, the Organizer, was released in 1984 by Psion, followed by Psion's Series 3, in 1991. The latter began to resemble the more familiar PDA style, including a full keyboard.[4][5] The term PDA was first used on January 7, 1992 by Apple Computer CEO John Sculley at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada, referring to the Apple Newton.[6] In 1994, IBM introduced the first PDA with full telephone functionality, the IBM Simon, which can also be considered the first smartphone. Then in 1996, Nokia introduced a PDA with telephone functionality, the 9000 Communicator, which became the world's best-selling PDA. Another early entrant in this market was Palm, with a line of PDA products which began in March 1996. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personal_digital_assistant

    1. However, a healthy news ecosystem doesn’t just require a thriving free press, it also needs a diversity of curators, newsletters and content discovery options that enable the weird and wonderful to surface. We want to use Nuzzel as a test kitchen to see what models works for curators as well as content creators. The simple goal is a sustainable open web where the goals of creators, curators and consumers are aligned around the best possible experience.

      This sounds exciting to me and could dovetail with efforts of many with respect to IndieWeb for Journalism.

    1. intentional about learning

      Absolutely. I've also been thinking about this in terms of "learning out loud" openly online.

    2. Do

      I like that most of these focus on process…as opposed to product. I still think they need to be revisited and remixed to capture my earlier note.

      Also thinking about issues of ownership, sharing, and IP online. This would call in a need for CC-licensing, open learning, OER, etc.

    1. every individual has the means to decide how their knowledge is governed and managed to address their needs
    2. knowledge commons

      The idea of a "knowledge commons" was referenced in the book, "Campesino a Campesino: Voices from Latin America’s Farmer to Farmer Movement for Sustainable Agriculture" by Eric Holt-Giménez in the context of agroecological knowledge inherent in agrarian communities in Latin America.

    3. independent

      What does independent mean in this context?

  6. Jan 2019
    1. Am I having my students read a bunch of monographs, all authored by white males, for example?

      We need better ways to incentivize the finding and sharing of these more diverse arrays of knowledge forms and knowledge producers, particularly I think at introductory levels. When faculty balk at the labor of finding appropriate and diverse readings, we need resources to show that some of the work has already been done.

    1. This is one of the most important decisions in an EFA (Thompson, 2004; Warne & Larsen, 2014), and these decisions can make g artificially easier or harder to identify.

      Deciding the number of factors to retain can be extremely subjective. But that was why it was so important to pre-register our work. We wanted to choose methods for making this decision before seeing the data so that no one could accuse of us of trying to monkey with the data until we got the results we wanted.

    2. For the sake of transparency, we find it important to explicitly state deviations from our preregistration protocol. First, in our preregistration, we stated that we would search for (cognitive OR intelligence) AND the name of a continent or population. However, searching for a continent was not feasible in finding data sets. We also had difficulty generating a list of population groups (e.g., ethnic groups, tribal groups) that would be useful for our search procedures.

      This was my second time I pre-registered the study and the first time my student co-author had. We are still getting the hang of it.

    1. Apart from the free and open source KNIME Analytics Platform, KNIME also has commercial offerings. The KNIME server provides a platform for sharing workflows. It has a web interface and is connected to a KNIME instance for executing workflows remotely on demand or according to a schedule. Also commercially available are the Big Data Extensions and the KNIME Spark executor.
    1. If the open source community really wants to make a difference, then the some focus should be directed toward back-end, e-commerce billing systems. The regulatory conditions of the market have reached a point where it is incredibly inefficient for them to be tracked and applied by hand.

      This is an incredibly important point.

  7. Dec 2018
    1. Le commerce de l’échange savant dont les règles, les formes et les lieux peuvent être mis en cartes produit diverses sortes de validations qui permettent à leurs bénéficiaires d’entrer dans la négociation de situations matérielles : l’expression République des Lettres couvre, et mêle tout à la fois ces formes, ces lieux et un bon nombre de ces situations. Alors que l’échange et la validation des savoirs par les institutions académiques sont soumis à des conditions d’accès étroites et à des délais de publication encore plus longs pour les mémoires reçus par les sociétés que pour ceux de leurs propres membres, les périodiques savants s’ouvrent à des contributions d’origines très diverses qu’ils publient rapidement.

      cohabitation et complémentarité des formes de communication savante (voir l'intervention de Judith). Le périodique apparaît comme une ouverture.

    1. In the most physically salient and concrete example, ‘spatial boundaries’ [11] at work—such as office or cubicle walls—are being removed to create open ‘unbounded’ offices in order to stimulate greater collaboration and collective intelligence. Does it work?

      This type of office plan saves money. Small start ups have this type of office because it is cheaper and more flexible for a growing company. Increases collaboration? Most of our jobs are not collaborative.

    2. Contrary to common belief, the volume of face-to-face interaction decreased significantly (approx. 70%) in both cases, with an associated increase in electronic interaction.

      This fits with my observances and the anecdotal information I've gotten from others.

    1. OSS contribution takes time; I don't think anyone would contest that. Getting familiar with a project, finding out where you can fit into it, reading and responding to issues, testing and submitting patches, writing documentation. All of that requires a good deal of time.

      I reached out to a prominent OSS company preferring a "history of open source contributions" and put forward the idea that people who code for a living don't always have the opportunity. The response was surprisingly hostile:

      It doesn't exclude anyone. Zero chance I'm going to have a debate about it.

    1. Today, I had the privilege of speaking on a panel at the Comparative and International Education Society’s Annual Conference with representatives of two open education projects that depend on Creative Commons licenses to do their work. One is the OER publisher Siyavula, based in Cape Town, South Africa. Among other things, they publish textbooks for use in primary and secondary school in math and science. After high school students in the country protested about the conditions of their education – singling out textbook prices as a barrier to their learning – the South African government relied on the Creative Commons license used by Siyavula to print and distribute 10 million Siyavula textbooks to school children, some of whom had never had their own textbook before. The other are the related teacher education projects, TESSA, and TESS-India, which use the Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike license on teacher training materials. Created first in English, the projects and their teachers rely on the reuse rights granted by the Creative Commons license to translate and localize these training materials to make them authentic for teachers in the linguistically and culturally diverse settings of sub-Saharan Africa and India. (Both projects are linked to and supported by the Open University in the UK, http://www.open.ac.uk/, which uses Creative Commons-licensed materials as well.) If one wakes up hoping to feel that one’s work in the world is useful, then an experience like this makes it a good day.

      I think contextualizing Creative Commons material as a component in global justice and thinking of fair distribution of resources and knowledge as an antidote to imperialism is a provocative concept.This blog, infojusticeorg offers perspectives on social justice and Creative Commons by many authors.

    1. I think contextualizing the applications of a tool like Unpaywall in the OA movement could be useful in the 5.3 section, as an added paragraph. Unpaywall helps researchers find papers that are available freely on the web. Often these papers are held in university repositories or author websites. The author may have transferred copyright to the publisher at the time of publication for a window of time that has expired, or the author may have retained copyright of their publication. I think that the idea of a scientific language decoder for the public is an excellent educational tool and potential public service.

  8. Nov 2018
    1. At its core, open pedagogy is teaching practices that facilitate the collaborative and transparent construction of knowledge made openly available through online communities.

      This might be one of the most succinct definitions of open pedagogy I have seen.

    1. OER matters not because textbooks matter. OER matters because it highlights an example of how something central to our public missions, the transfer of our foundational disciplinary knowledge from one generation of scholars to the next, has been co-opted by private profit. And OER is not a solution, but a systemic shift from private to public architecture in how we deliver learning.

      I love this framing of OER as public infrastructure to facilitate the transfer of knowledge. I think it is not only generational, but also more broadly to the public. OER use is not limited to just students within our institutions, but are available freely and openly more broadly to the public. To anyone. I think we need to make that point more widely known. Every OER that is made freely available is making knowledge more open to not only students in our institutions, but to anyone, anywhere. It truly is "public" infrastructure.

    1. Freedom of intramural expression means that teaching personnel is not only allowed to teach according to their knowledge, but that they can take part in the administration of their institutions. This is supported by the freedom of extramural expression, which gives teachers the capacity to share their research outcomes and disseminate the knowledge acquired.

      participation in activities to share research outcomes.

    1. Researchers now typically engage in a range of ‘questionable research practices’ in the hunt for the glory of publication, with such conditions leading to mental health issues in a higher proportion than any other industry.  

      'publish or perish' culture creating mental health issues.

    1. How do you feel about writing in books?

      Open Questions:

      1. What is your approach to leaving marks in the books you own?
      2. Is your approach any different when you're interacting with library books or other shared volumes?
      3. Do you ever type out notes to yourself when using e-readers or interacting with a digital pdf?

      Feel free to share your response to one or more of these questions by clicking the arrow button at the bottom right-hand side of this annotation.

    1. At the same time, we now have several years of experience launching and running new and innovative publications in broad fields. For example, PeerJ – the Journal of Life & Environmental Sciences covers all of biology, the life sciences, and the environmental sciences in a single title; whilst PeerJ Computer Science is targeted towards a more well-defined community. In 2013 we also launched a preprint server (PeerJ Preprints) which covers all the areas in which we publish; and we have developed a comprehensive suite of journal and peer-review functionalities.

      New journals released by PeerJ

    1. This is Colony.A platform foropen organizations.

      a platform for cooperative open communities

    1. GITenberg vise notamment à permettre de renseigner de la façon la plus riche et collaborative possible les méta-données des livres, afin d’alimenter qualitativement les catalogues de bibliothèques qui souhaiteront y puiser, en plus du grand public.

      Gitenberg: collaboration + open source (github + gutenberg)

    1. To ensure that research findings are shared widely and are made freely available at the time of publication, Wellcome and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation have today (Monday) joined cOAlition S (opens in a new tab) and endorsed the principles of Plan S.

      First charitable funders to join Plan-S

    1. Open Science has the potential to make the scientific enterprise more inclusive, and bridge North-South divides in research,

      Open science towards reducing the north-south divide

    1. The Moodle project

      Moodle is one of the largest open source collaborative platform used in the development of curriculum.

      Moodle is an Australian company and has various levels of subscriptions including one level for free. Overall I have found the site to be user friendly rich with demos, documentation and support including community forums. This site supports multiple languages and has an easy to use drop down menu for that selection.

      RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  9. Oct 2018
    1. Die Bestimmungen dieses Reglementssind auch anwendbar auf Gesuche oderBeiträge des SNF, die bis am 1. April 2018 beantragtundzugesprochenwurden,sowie auf Beiträge, die am 1. April 2018 laufend oder abgelaufen sind.

      Übergangsbestimmungen OA-Bestimmungen vom 1.4.2018

    1. For students to work in the open, everything they use has to be original content, openly licensed, or in the public domain

      have to disagree here. Students can link, quote, summarize, paraphrase, and thus build or contribute to open resources from closed information

    1. Restricting access to information, limiting engagement and participation, and providing learners and instructors with little control over the learning activity, materials, or processes creates a demotivating experience

      Restricting and limiting are keys to profit-making. Relate to education as a commons

    2. ‘making the bad diffi cult and the good easy’”

      a good design principle

    3. access, agency, ownership, participation and experience

      principles of open ed - compare to Downes: autonomy, diversity, interactivity, openness

  10. Sep 2018
    1. open policies

      Some possible new items to add, relevant to module 5.5, Opening Up Your Institution:

      1. OER Africa has an in-depth OER policy review and development toolkit. It looks at issues around developing OER policies from the perspective of students, faculty, institutions, government context, and more. It includes case studies relevant to the regional context with probing questions to consider after each case study. It is from 2012, but many of the considerations about developing and implementing an OER policy that are included in the toolkit are still relevant. This resource can be valuable when thinking about possibly instituting an OER policy at one's own institution. The toolkit is licensed CC BY 4.0, South Africa Institute for Distance Education.

      The next two resources are relevant to the section on OER policies because it provides examples of policies along with case studies and challenges that differ in different parts of the world. It can help people see how what works in one place may not work well elsewhere.

      1. There is a global open policy report from 2016, ed. Kelsey Wiens and Alek Tarkowski, published by the open policy network: https://openpolicynetwork.org/solving-some-of-the-worlds-toughest-problems-with-the-global-open-policy-report/ It includes reports on open policies in Africa & the Middle East, Asia, Australia, Latin America, Europe, and North America. There is an overview in each section along with case studies. This report is also housed on the CC website: https://creativecommons.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/StateofOpenPolicyFullReport_FINAL-1-1-1-1.pdf The report is licensed CC BY 4.0.

      2. The ROER4D project (research on OER for development) produced a report in 2017 called Spotlight on OER policy in the Global South: Case studies from the Research on Open Educational Resources for Development (ROER4D) project. The main questions addressed include: "What is the state of OER policy development in the Global South?" "To what extent do developing countries need OER policies for OER adoption to flourish there?" The report discusses ROER4D research in four countries: Colombia, South Africa, Afghanistan and Mongolia. The report is licensed CC BY 4.0

    1. Each aspect of the scientific cycle—research design, data collection, analysis, and publication—can and should be made more transparent and accessible.

      Cmp. article draft from 2011 related to science in general, not particularly for education science.

  11. Aug 2018
    1. YouTube Lectures by Kevin

      If you hold down the CMD or CTRL key while clicking the video links, the video will open up in a new tab. Otherwise, when you go "back" to the book from the video, you'll be sent back to the beginning of the book. Not great.

    1. The philosopher Karl Popper, author of The Open Society and Its Enemies, did not stay involved. He had a more nuanced view on markets and freedom, pointing out that ‘proponents of complete freedom are in actuality, whatever their intentions, enemies of freedom’. Popper saw the logical consequence of ignoring how power, unregulated markets and unrestrained individual behaviour would interact, reasoning that this notion of freedom would, paradoxically, be, ‘not only self-destructive but bound to produce its opposite, for if all restraints were removed there would be nothing whatever to stop the strong enslaving the weak’. By Popper’s definition, neoliberalism wasn’t liberal at all.

      Is it fair to at least partially blame Popper for the advent of neoliberalism? If not, is it fair to question the use of the term "open" to describe the ideal society?