88 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2020
    1. By some measures distance education students are somewhat less prepared (e.g. fewer of them attended private high schools) but still have a better chance of graduating college than students who do not take distance education courses. Put simply, at a national level, even potentially less prepared students who participated in distance education early in their college careers were more likely to attain a degree than students who had not done so.

      A followup to studies of community college students in Virginia and Washington, this national study found that students who enrolled in online classes early in their college careers were more likely to complete their degrees. This was true even though students in online classes are somewhat less prepared than those in in person classes. One difference may be that this study was published a few years after the Virginia one, and more students were enrolled in online classes by then. 9/10

    1. While scholars have applied the assumptions of andragogy to inform quality online course design, this work proposes that an online course designed using sound pedagogical principles can exhibit a learning experience beneficial to adult learners.

      This short article links Anderson and McCormick's pedagogical principles for online learning with Knowles' andragogical assumptions about adult learning. 8/10

    1. In order to inform the development and implementation of effective online learning environments, this study was designed to explore both instructors' and students' online learning experiences while enrolled in various online courses. The study investigated what appeared to both support and hinder participants' online teaching and learning experiences.

      The authors discuss the issue of community and engagement in online graduate programs. They carried out a small case study and used a Cognitive Apprenticeship Model to examine a successful program in Higher Education. They found that students feel too many online classes are just reading and writing, regurgitating rather than applying, and lack sufficient connection with the instructor and with other students, They recommend some strategies to fix that, but admit that more work is needed. 9/10

    1. We eventually hope to create affect-sensitive learning environments that respond constructively and effectively to boredom and confusion. When we do, we will have made significant progress towards improving students’ learning experiences, reducing problem behaviors such as gaming the system, managing students’ frustration and confusion in the face of impasses, and ultimately improving students’ learning.

      Researchers studied students cognitive-affective states doing online learning in 3 separate, very different studies, among different student populations, ranging from 12-year-olds to college students. They found that, contrary to prior assumptions, frustration did not necessarily have negative learning outcomes. Boredom tended to last longest of the cognitive-affective states covered, led to the greatest attempts to game the system, and had the least successful learning outcomes. Confusion was sometimes beneficial and sometimes harmful. Therefore, online learning environments should be developed that guard against boredom and perhaps confusion, rather than frustration. 8/10

    1. Therefore, practitioners need to be cognisant of the important role they play in influenc-ing learner motivation when designing learning activities. Most importantly, the relevance and value of the task (e.g., online discussions) need to be clearly identified and linked to learning objectives to help learners understand how the activity can aid in the realisation of personal goals, aspirations, and interests, both in the short and longer term.

      Based on research and two small scale case studies, some students in online learning are intrinsically motivated, but others need to be motivated by the teacher and material. External influences such as deadlines and grades also influenced student motivation. Identified regulation, that is, knowing why the activity is valuable and important, make a very big difference in student motivation. This brings us back to the andragogical idea that the assignments should involve real-world situations and be applicable to students' lives. 9/10

    1. Online learning environments have a promising future for researchers, practitioners, and learners. However designing and developing more effective and efficient online learning environments is possible with ongoing research and development. This paper offers four research goals and matches four existing methodologies to improve student outcomes in online learning environments defined as learner achievement, engagement, and retention.

      The authors outline four general research goals, and then go into detail on some of the questions that should be researched within those areas. They then suggest four methodologies to use in designing students to research those questions: formative, developmental, and experimental research and activity theory. All of these could help include online learning in terms of learner achievement, engagement, and retention. 9/10

    1. ​Institutions that were primarily online before the pandemic are also doing well. At colleges where more than 90 percent of students took courses solely online pre-pandemic, enrollments are growing for both undergraduate (6.8 percent) and graduate students (7.2 percent).
    1. Language Research Bulletin,32, ICU, TokyoAndragogy in the 21st century: Applying the Assumptions of Adult Learning Online

      This article emphasizes the importance of creating online programs that have learning objectives that correspond to learners' real-world needs. It examines Knowles' Andragogical Model to provide guidelines for incorporating adult learning principles into course design. 10/10, very good blend of strategy and theory.

  2. dergipark.org.tr dergipark.org.tr
    1. Blueprint for In-Service Teacher Training Program in Technology Integration

      This article looks at the gap between teacher efficiency in in-person versus online teaching and the need to effectively build teachers' competencies in the are of technology to ensure teachers are not incompetent at teaching online. This study collected data from 122 English language teachers and used the findings to create a blueprint for other institutions hoping to increases teachers' ability to successfully integrate technology into their lessons. 6/10, the study was too small to be truly persuasive scientifically and the findings were more helpful for institutions rather than individual educators.

    1. Teaching with Web 2.0 Technologies: Benefits, Barriers and Lessons Learned

      In this article, the author defines Web 2.0 technology and use for Web 2.0 in higher education. Through a small study of educators, discovery includes advantages, obstacles, and general guidance for implementation of web 2.0 tools. The author supports use of Web 2.0 to supplement learning, not as a substitute for the educator. Technologies must be implemented strategically and purposefully. 7/10

    1. Social Media and Networking Technologies: An Analysis of Collaborative Work and Team Communication

      Trends in Web 2.0 technologies and various networking modalities are briefly reviewed. Furthermore, advantages and barriers in the use of said technologies are discussed. Implementation of social media as a learning tool can be advantageous, however, it must supplement learning, not replace a structured environment. The educator should still remain present in the learning environment. And, he/she should provide appropriate support and training, as well as model, respective online tools to ensure efficacy. 6/10

    1. How To Make Online Corporate Learning Fun During Lockdown

      (Available in text or audio.) This article provides basic principles (agenda, duration) and technologies (gamification, discussion boards) and activities to keep employees engaged in online learning. While this provides strategy, it does not provide implementation guidance within the corporate environment. (2/10)

    1. Project Based Learning to Develop 21st Century Competencies

      In this chapter, the author defines problem based learning (PBL) and highlights the benefits to the learner. In addition to incorporating technology to enhance learning, the article reinforces the need to foster the softer skills that may be developed as a result of PBL (teamwork, accountability, problem-solving, creative thinking, risk-taking, communication skills, and critical thinking skills). Though the data is limited, and there are inherent challenges, PBL is of value in course design. (8/10)

    1. Characteristics of Adult Learners With Implications for Online Learning Design

      The author reviews assumptions of the adult learner and adult learning theory. In discussion of adult learning theories (self-directed learning, experiential learning, transformational learning), the article investigates their use in online learning. Furthermore, the author provides online course development recommendations for the adult learner. A brief critique of andragogic principles is provided. Adult learning principles used in a live environment are of benefit and necessary in the virtual environment. Click "Full Text" to read article. 7/10

  3. Sep 2020
  4. Aug 2020
  5. Jul 2020
  6. Jun 2020
  7. May 2020
  8. Apr 2020
  9. Nov 2019
    1. Section 1.5 Online Learner Characteristics, Technology and Skill Requirements

      This website outlines Section 1.5 of Angelo State University's guide to instructional design and online teaching. Section 1.5 describes key characteristics of online learners, as well as the technology and computer skills that research has identified as being important for online learners. Successful online learners are described as self-directed, motivated, well-organized, and dedicated to their education. The article also notes that online learners should understand how to use technology such as multimedia tools, email, internet browsers. and LMS systems. This resource serves as a guide to effective online teaching. Rating 10/10

    1. E-Learning Theory (Mayer, Sweller, Moreno)

      This website outlines key principles of the E-Learning Theory developed by Mayer, Sweller, and Moreno. E-Learning Theory describes how the implementation of educational technology can be combined with key principles of how we learn for better outcomes. This site describes those principles as a guide of more effective instructional design. Users can also find other learning theories under the "Categories" link at the top of the page. Examples include Constructivist theories, Media & Technology theories, and Social Learning theories. Rating: 8/10

    1. As educational technologies, instructional design and online learning/content delivery platforms keep evolving, more learners with more needs and motives will be drawn to taking online courses – a growing demand that in turn will spur further improvements in technology and delivery.

      Educational Technology offers free articles with sources.

      Rating: 5/10

    1. n. Key to this model is the assumption that online education has evolved as a subset of learning in general rather than a subset of distance learning

      This article helps the reader understand the major theories that are related to technology using the leaning theories, theoretical frameworks, and models. Rate: 4/5

  10. Jun 2019
    1. Every school with master’s degrees is at some stage of process in moving these programs online. Save for a very small number of elite programs, the model of full-time residential master’s is in decline. The question appears to be not if master's programs will move online, but how they will do so.

      Implications for libraries...

  11. Apr 2019
    1. The ITL department at The Ohio State University at Mansfield has six primary themes: (a) developmentally appropriate practice, (b) integrated curriculum, (c) literature-based instruction, (d) classroom-based inquiry, (e) diversity and equity issues, and (f) technology integration. The goal for technology integration, like the other themes in the program, is to integrate the theme into each course of the program, when appropriate. For example, instructors find ways to integrate children’s literature into each of the methods courses, whether it is a mathematics, science, or social studies methods course. The goal is to integrate the common themes of the program throughout the methods courses and the other graduate courses leading up to student teaching.
  12. Mar 2019
    1. The world’s largest selection of courses

      Udemy is an online platform where experts in various fields can create paid courses. You can learn languages, web design, photography, musical instruments all in your own time. The platform also allows for extensive ranking and reviews to be put on instructors and courses to keep the quality high. Instruction is inexpensive and self-paced. it is larger aimed at teenagers and adult learners and focuses on skills. Rating 10/10

    1. Designing Technology for Adult Learners: Applying Adult Learning Theory

      Discusses how adult learning theory can be applied for digital learning for adults. It suggests making sure interactions are built on real world and relevant situations, that learners and go at their own pace, they are allowed to reflect on their learning, and interact with each other and different points of view. Rating 10/10

    1. The eZoomBook Tool: A Blended and Eclectic Approach to Digital Pedagogy

      Discusses the use of the eZoomBook Tool which has the ability to allow learners to navigate back through subject matter they need to refresh on as they learn new material. It allows peer to peer teaching and working which is it's most successful feature for adult learners. the eZB template is open-format and can be adapted to a variety of learning situations. Results from their initial experiments show high use of intrinsic motivation for adult learners once they got a handle on the platform.

    1. Beyond the Click: Rethinking Assessment of an Adult Professional Development MOOC

      Examines the design and implementation of a MOOC about flipped teaching. It used digital surveys and the LMS system to gauge participant experiences and expectations. A unique aspect of this MOOC is that it asked participants to set what level of activity they expected to have in the program: active, passive, drop-in, observer. And it found that 60% of people engaged directly at that level. This is useful for designing online education experience and connecting participants with each other and in the classroom based upon their learning goals.

    1. Can an Evidence-Based Blended Learning Model Serve Healthcare Patients and Adult Education Students?

      Discusses the use of blended-learning incorporating technology especially for adult education programs that reduce education gaps and help the under-employed with career readiness. This also focuses in on adults with chronic disease and how online education might better support their needs. It uses constructivist leanings placing education in the context of activity and environment and recreating the correct environments online.

    1. The Career Curriculum Continuum

      Discusses the place of universities in lifelong learning, especially with the advancement of technology in education in the workforce. The career curriculum continuum, includes free and self-paced options such as MOOCs, educational video on Youtube, and Wikis, but also suggests more structured learning placed in context. Universities can offer this as short courses that are cheaper and offer more options for pathways to a full degree program. It also suggests professional certificates for expanding the skills of those already working. Digital institutions will be the most widely used methods for consuming knew knowledge and advancing skills. Rating 10/10

    1. Using Web 2.0 to teach Web 2.0: A case study in aligningteaching, learning and assessment with professionalpractice

      Research article. Discussed the use of web 2.0 including blogs, wikis, and social media as a method of information sharing that is impacting education through teaching and learning management. The work suggests that learning outcomes, activities, and assessment have to be in alignment to create effective learning experiences and uses a case study within an information management program in which students use various web 2.0 tools and document their use .

    1. The use of digital technologies across the adult life span in distance education.

      Research article. This article explores how older and younger student approach studying through the use of technology and reveals that those in older age groups were more likely to use technology in deep in focused ways to study once they got the hang of it and younger groups were more likely to remain on the surface level of a variety of technologies.

    1. Effect of a metacognitive scaffolding on self-efficacy, metacognition, and achievement in e-learning environments

      Research paper. This work highlights how scaffolding, meaning students work through their learning in stages with support from digital technology, making adjustments to their learning environment as needed as they progress through material. Self-evaluations are a critical component of this to help reflect on the content learned. Scaffolding helps students determine not only what to do but how to do it until they are ready to learn more fully on their own. Rating 6/10

    1. Report: Why Tech for Adult Learning So Often Misses the Mark

      Popular article. This article overviews the U.S. Department of Education LINCS system report which shows that there is a disconnect between those that design adult learning technology and the stakeholders (learners and employers) that plan to use it. Often technology is retrofitted, as it was originally intended for K-12 and won't work in the ways adult learners and educators need for them. One of the main ways to circumvent this is to design technology for a specific problem that needs to be solved, instead of starting with the solution. Rating 4/10

    1. Application  of  Virtual  and  Augmented  Reality  tothe  Field  of  Adult  Education

      Research Article from the Adult Education Research Conference. This article examines the history of VR as a tool to train military personnel, and medical professionals and how future directions of VR could be used for other adult education situations especially due to their low risk learning environment. The authors examine how VR could also be used in gaming, arts, entertainment, marketing and business fields. This is important because VR environments also allow students to exploring changing technology and practice self-learning. Rating 6/10

    1. Report: It's Time for Ed Tech to Tackle the Adult Learner

      This article recommends the way in which education technology should adapt to be aimed at adult learners. Specifically that education should all students to assess themselves as they go and fill in any missing gaps in knowledge. It should also be relevant to their life needs, and connect their own experiences back into the learning environment. I feel most of this is known in adult learning theory in general, however this article is really aimed at those outside the industry and is a very helpful summary in this way. Rating 7/10

    1. Top 10 Tools For The Digital Classroom

      Article overviews tools in technology that are useful for bringing learners together in the classroom, especially in ways that enhance their interaction with digital media and each other. Although many of them seem to be aimed at younger learners I feel like some of the tools, like Quizlet, and Prezi are especially useful for adult learners. Rating 10/10

    1. An investigation into the attraction and completion rates of MOOCs Sergey Kruchinin

      Research Paper. Discusses the use of MOOCs and their completion rates as tools for education. MOOCs are often touted as the best way to get education to the popular masses. The study shows that MOOCs coming from universities with major names on just a few platforms like Coursera tend to be the most successful in terms of completion rate. Courses that have auto grading features are more attractive to students, probably because they get feedback immediately. Rating 4/10

    1. This website is a free website that allows for users to access summaries of learning theories, educational guides and much more!

  13. Nov 2018
    1. Facilitating Adult Learning Through Computer-Mediated Distance Education

      This is an interesting article to discover the history of adult learning technology in a hybrid setting. The study included both face-to-face and online meetings/assignments.

    1. Instructional Design Strategies for Intensive Online Courses: An Objectivist-Constructivist Blended Approach

      This was an excellent article Chen (2007) in defining and laying out how a blended learning approach of objectivist and constructivist instructional strategies work well in online instruction and the use of an actual online course as a study example.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. Online Options Give Adults Access, but Outcomes Lag

      In this article, drivers that increase and improve online learning success in adults are explored. State by state data along with federal stats contribute to the conclusions presented.

      Roughly 13% of all undergraduates are full-time online students and between 2012 and 2017 online students grew y 11 percent, about 2.25 million. The article presents a map showing state by state stats and the information provided can assist in growing individual school needs.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. Learning Needs Analysis of Collaborative E-Classes in Semi-Formal Settings: The REVIT Example.

      This article explores the importance of analysis of instructional design which seems to be often downplayed particularly in distance learning. ADDIE, REVIT have been considered when evaluating whether the training was meaningful or not and from that a central report was extracted and may prove useful in the development of similar e-learning situations for adult learning.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  14. Mar 2018
    1. Nearly 70 percent of those who require professors to work with designers or in teams report "lots of" student-faculty interaction in their online courses, compared to about 40 percent of those whose campuses either don't provide design support or make it optional.

      Yay for IDs! ;)

  15. www.edx.org www.edx.org
    1. Mooc website I currently use myself. The selection of courses is triple those of other website offering free courses.

  16. Feb 2018
  17. Aug 2017
  18. Jun 2017
  19. Apr 2017
    1. For about $3,000 each, telepresence robots -- which look like iPads mounted on small Segway self-balancing, battery-powered machines -- are making distance learning easier, clearer and more realistic for online students at hundreds of colleges and universities.

      I think this is cool!

  20. Feb 2017
  21. Dec 2016
    1. Ninety-five percent of 12- to 17-year-olds already go online on a regular basis. They use social networks, and create and contribute to websites. Our work is focused on taking full advantage of the kinds of tools and technologies that have transformed every other aspect of life to power up and accelerate students’ learning. We need to do things differently, not just better.

      Hypothes.is nicely bridges the worlds of social media and formal education.

  22. Sep 2016
    1. Coursera announces Coursera for Business, shifting toward corporate learning. Udacity has already followed the same path.

      Coursera mission statement from early 2012: "We are committed to making the best education in the world freely available to any person who seeks it." 2016: "Meh."

  23. Dec 2015
  24. Aug 2015
    1. Flexibility

      Some connection with SAMR, unbundling, “open learning”… With diverse learners whose constraints may affect institutions, there’s a fair bit of talk about new(ish) tech-infused approaches to distance education. As with many other things, not much of it is new. But there might be some enabling phenomena. Not sure how gamification fits, here. Sure, open play could allow for a lot of flexibility. But gamification is pretty much the reverse: game mechanics without the open-ended playfulness.