96 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2019
    1. Digital skills focus on what and how. Digital literacy focuses on why, when, who, and for whom. For example, teaching digital skills would include showing students how to download images from the Internet and insert them into PowerPoint slides or webpages. Digital literacy would focus on helping students choose appropriate images, recognize copyright licensing, and cite or get permissions, in addition to reminding students to use alternative text for images to support those with visual disabilities.

      Knowing how to carry out the digital tasks would be the skills that the individual has. However, when he can explain the rationale behind choices made and knows the proper etiquette that guides his actions when performing the skill, then he can be said to be digitally literate

    2. We can only begin to put the seeds of this critical literacy in our classes and hope students will transfer this beyond the classroom and into their increasingly digital identities and lives.

      This is a point really relevant to our world now. Digital use of technology has drastically increased, and is relied upon in classroom teaching environments. What we are seeing in our younger communities is research about overuse of digital technology having a potentially negative effect on learning, ability to communicate and empathise, and mental health. Things, such as bullying, can be carried out in private rather than in the school playground, which can make it a more dangerous behaviour. We've got to acknowledge that while digital technology is fantastic, overuse of digital platforms such as social networking can be detrimental. Digital technology has ballooned faster than we can understand its effects on us. I propose that part of digital literacy is also learning appropriateness of its use, and how to balance the use of technology in our lives so that it does not become all consuming.

    1. As an educator, I have applied digital literacy skills in my secondary school science classrooms. I have used instructional media like iClickers and SMART boards for interactive activities and virtual laboratories. I have also used grade management software like MarkBook to deduce and analyze trends for individual students and whole classes. Online instructional tools such as Wikis empower digitally smart educators to collaboratively design and deliver resources to nurture young minds. For students to be digitally literate, they not only need to learn how to use technology, but to be critical of the information they gather. Students are exposed to information digitally—articles, statistics, videos. They require explicit instruction that information might be old, biased, fake, illegal, or discriminatory. The Ontario provincial curriculum, like many others, talks about imparting 21st century skills, and digital literacy falls under that category. Educators are evolving instruction to teach students to discern information by being analytical thinkers.

      This is an interesting view of the differences in digital literacy according to who the user is, particularly from an education perspective. We have the educator using technology as a resource to share information, and the learner using technology as a resource to learn while also learning how to be critically reflective of how they are using it. Without saying so, this is a fair example of the difference between digital skills, and digital literacy.

    1. In 2016, Wikipedia defined Digital literacy as the knowledge, skills, and behaviors used in a broad range of digital devices such as smartphones, tablets, laptops and desktop PCs, all of which are seen as network rather than computing devices. In other words, this definition somehow extends computer literacy by networking aspects, but further down, digital literacy is rather defined in terms of applicable competencies, including social ones

      This statement acknowledges the flexibility of the definition of digital literacy. This edutech wiki article has introductions to a collection of different models with links to the sources and a reference list. A great overview and launchpad for understanding digital literacy.

    1. But when they're actually doing something themselves--in the virtual worlds on iPads or laptops--that retention rate skyrockets to 90%.

      This resonates with teaching and learning philosophies. Learning through reading, hearing, seeing are passive activities and utlise less brain activity. Active participation increases activation of neuro pathways which increases the ability to make connections and cognitively develop knowledge. This research reflects that appropriately managed use of digital technology can be beneficial in education and as this demonstrates, can promote education. It would be helpful if this article had a reference list.

  2. Sep 2019
    1. The use of social media during the Arab Spring. People used social media in a way that went far beyond knowing how to click and deep into civic uses and navigating ways to communicate with others under the radar of a communication-hindering government. It was a way of both encouraging one another to remain critical and supporting one another through adversity in creative ways.

    1. takes time to build.

      This is such an important point. Critical judgement about any topic takes time to learn - probably more time than a handful of workshops, a single subject or even a semester. And it will be an ongoing process as the cultural context and technologies change. Teaching these skills/literacies is not a one-and-done

    2. Digital literacy is not about the skills of using technologies, but how we use our judgment to maintain awareness of what we are reading and writing, why we are doing it, and whom we are addressing.

      This excerpt brings to mind a video-editing course I taught at a local art college. The students came from various backgrounds and skill levels, so I had to access their individual approaches to storytelling before we could even attempt an assembly of clips. We watched a lot of films from different genres and countries. Our discussions about how frames are stitched together to form "visual grammar" revealed that no two editors assemble a film the exact same way. Mastering the skills of visual communication allowed the students to than work toward mastering the software; but had I concentrated on just teaching them the mechanics of editing (which my faculty head insisted on) there would've been less compelling edits and more of the same cookie-cutter results. We also kept a careful eye on our student "audience" responses to help analyze what worked and what didn't. The culmination of all this was a focused deconstruction of how movies are spliced together to form the experiences that we enjoy.

    1. Professors rightly object to its use for final papers, but see it as a valuable jumping off point for research,

      The irony of an entry on the "Reliability of Wikipedia" posted on Wikipedia notwithstanding, the author(s) do make the point that I have heard directly from my professors and instructors; that Wikipedia is a good starting point and the footnotes and bibliographies can often lead to more accurate resources.

    1. “The first step is admitting that everyone, from students to doctors, uses Wikipedia,”

      Good advice, since it's not designed to dismiss Wikipedia out of hand, but acknowledges the fact that it is the de facto source for online information second (probably) to Google.

    1. Fairness includes offering a balanced, reasoned argument, not selected or slanted.

      "Fairness" has weighted connotations and can be easily confused with unbiased opinion. The FCC once had a policy that allowed for diverse views to be broadcast thus facilitating open discourse while allowing divergent views a quorum for public evaluation. In this context, one must consider the facts as they're presented and look for signs of deceptive argumentation: straw man, ad hominem, or fallacies of false equivalencies all of which can sound analytical, but are antithetical to fairness.

  3. Aug 2019
    1. Although most of these editors are undoubtedly intelligent and passionate about enhancing the accuracy of Wikipedia, the site falls far short of its ideals of providing “the sum of all human knowledge” without the broad perspectives that a more diversified pool of editors would bring.

      "The sum of all human knowledge" should have editors of diverse cultural backgrounds from all parts of the world.

    1. For example, at the University of California, Los Angeles, Jeff Share teaches his education students to triangulate any research they come across online by finding multiple sources of the same information, reports The Washington Post.

      Triangulation seems to be a good way of weeding out doubtful sources.

    2. Yet, because anyone can write a Wikipedia entry, it’s often highly stigmatized in academic communities. This latest study, however, shows that if consumed carefully, Wikipedia can be a legitimate resource.

      We obviously have to carefully evaluate the information using CARS or any other recommended checklist.

    3. So, if Wikipedia is good enough for scientists, it should be good enough for students, right? This is where digital literacy best practices come in

      Not sure I agree with this statement.

    1. Research. As zero-textbook-cost degrees are implemented across the country, research could be conducted to analyze the impact of degree establishment on student access and success, as well as on faculty pedagogical practice. Metrics related to access and success might include credit loads, withdrawal rates, persistence rates, pass rates, and actual cost savings.

      Zero-textbook cost degrees is still a long way off as far as India goes. Our students are now extremely proficient in the use of the internet and open sources. However, compared to open access resources use of standardised textbooks in traditionnal classrooms is definitely better as teachers has a personal connect with the student. This is particularly necessary as students are becoming victims of PUBG and other such addctive games leading to either suicide or other behavioural problems. We do not need a plethora of zombie students in our schools and colleges!

    1. As far as I can tell, open educational practice captures the true potential of OER to improve teaching and learning. Now that adoption of OER has been maturing and expanding, more people are interested in how to use OER more effectively. In other words, they’re asking what can OER do that traditional textbooks cannot?

      Replacing text books with open resources does push teachers out of their comfort zones!

    1. Digital literacy is very much different from digital skills. Actually Librarian nowaday is training students with these DL skills: copyright, academic integrity, permissions,...

  4. Jun 2019
  5. Mar 2019
  6. Oct 2018
    1. Increase In The Usage Of mLearning For Formal Learning Fueled by microlearning and the concept of learning paths that now enable traditional eLearning courses to be mapped to multiple microlearning nuggets that can be taken on the go, this trend will continue to grow.
    2. Mobile eLearners typically study for 40 minutes longer than students using a desktop or tablet. (Source: MNAlearning) Smartphone learners complete course material 45% faster than those using a computer. (Source: Lynda)

      I found this information very interesting.

  7. Sep 2018
    1. Digital literacy is not about the skills of using technologies, but how we use our judgment to maintain awareness of what we are reading and writing, why we are doing it, and whom we are addressing. We can only begin to put the seeds of this critical literacy in our classes and hope students will transfer this beyond the classroom and into their increasingly digital identities and lives.

      Extremely true and relatable concluding statements that sum up the purpose behind this article and transcends awareness over the issue.

    2. They need to recognize that there are back-channel discussions about what ends up appearing on the site. These discussions can be fraught with power dynamics, resulting in controversial issues appearing unbalanced as more powerful authors block alternative viewpoints.

      I never knew about this! It is quite interesting as it shifts our thoughts to the possibility of having different digital power dynamics at play and who decides about what ends up appearing on the site.

    3. After students have the skill to use multiple platforms, I allow them the choice of which platform to use for the support they need, but I make sure they ask questions. When is it best to do a Google search versus ask a question on Twitter? Why would students tweet to a particular hashtag or person versus another? When they tweet to people from another country in another time zone, what kind of context do they need to consider? What should they add, remove, or modify in order to communicate better?

      I think these are very insightful questions that rarely come to mind when I personally use social media. However these questions should be taken into account to know the audience you are addressing, and what kind of message do you want to put out there, and which social media platform to use.

    4. For example, teaching digital skills would include showing students how to download images from the Internet and insert them into PowerPoint slides or webpages. Digital literacy would focus on helping students choose appropriate images, recognize copyright licensing, and cite or get permissions, in addition to reminding students to use alternative text for images to support those with visual disabilities.

      A very helpful and simple example that clearly distinguishes between digital skills and digital literacies.

    5. It was a way of both encouraging one another to remain critical and supporting one another through adversity in creative ways.

      Social media had a huge role in the activating the initial sparks of the Arab spring through political posts and various media sharing

    6. For example, teaching digital skills would include showing students how to download images from the Internet and insert them into PowerPoint slides or webpages. Digital literacy would focus on helping students choose appropriate images, recognize copyright licensing, and cite or get permissions, in addition to reminding students to use alternative text for images to support those with visual disabilities

      Examples always makes it easier to grasp and understand the differences between such information. This example really helps a lot explaining the difference between digital literacy and digital skills..

    7. For example, it is worth discussing the process of Wikipedia. Although Wikipedia is not a scholarly source, it is usually a good enough first stop to learn about something. However, students need to know how it is updated. They need to recognize that there are back-channel discussions about what ends up appearing on the site. These discussions can be fraught with power dynamics, resulting in controversial issues appearing unbalanced as more powerful authors block alternative viewpoints.

      University professors always discourage us "students" from using Wikipedia or even taking a look at it as it's not credible, yet i agree it's useful for some background information

    8. confidence

      Lack of confidence is a significant barrier to digital engagement, especially among people who have not grown up with digital technology from childhood. This has several aspects, including: (a) feeling unsure of their own technical skills, (b) anticipating stressful technical problems with software and/or hardware, (c) lacking the tools to assess the trustworthiness of software/media providers and (d) having a heightened sense of 'stranger danger' because of the absence of familiar social cues and safeguards.

    1. Broadly speaking, digital fluency is a combination of these three concepts:digital, or technical, proficiency: able to understand, make judgements about, select and use appropriate technologies and technological systems for different purposes; this might include knowing how to use technologies to protect one’s data, digital identity, and device security.   digital literacy: in digital spaces, being able to read, create, critique and make judgements about the accuracy and worth of information being accessed; being fluent in critical thinking and problem-solving online; Use digital tools to collaborate and construct information across all relevant and significant contexts social competence, or dispositional knowledge: the ability to be able to relate to others and communicate with them effectively; able to manage one’s identity, information, relationships in ways that are appropriate, responsible, safe and sustainable.

      Digital fluency definition.

    1. Digital fluency is the ability to leverage technology to create new knowledge, new challenges, and new problems and to complement these with critical thinking, complex problem solving, and social intelligence to solve the new challenges. Digital fluency also requires excellent communication skills, new media literacy, and cognitive load management to address the issues, and concerns we face today and in the future.

      Digital fluency definition.

    1. Digital literacy is a language; the more digital skills you have, the better you can speak it.

      Does this metaphor make sense?

    2. Cornell University defines digital literacy as ‘the ability to find, evaluate, utilize, share, and create content using information technologies and the Internet’6. By this definition, digital skills are any skills related to being digitally literate. Anything from the ability to find out your high-score on Minesweeper to coding a website counts as a digital skill.

      Distinction between digital literacy and digital skills.

  8. Aug 2018
    1. This is a introduction to the OERu, with a special focus on the open source tools that make it all work for both learners and educators around the globe!

  9. May 2018
    1. Digital literacy is not about the skills of using technologies, but how we use our judgment to maintain awareness of what we are reading and writing, why we are doing it, and whom we are addressing.

      this is very true. At first, I did not understand the difference very well, but i believe that this sentence perfectly describes how literacy is about The What and the Why while the sskills are about the How.

  10. Apr 2018
    1. Digital skills focus on what and how. Digital literacy focuses on why, when, who, and for whom.

      Although they may seem different, but these terms are highly interrelated, and they are highly complementary, but one must understand the distinction between each term.

    2. When we encourage students to use technology, do we remind them of the risks of placing their information online and give them choices of how much personal information to reveal? Do our students recognize the ways in which Facebook’s privacy settings continually shift without user permission, and what posting a photo today might mean for their future employment opportunities? Do students recognize the importance of password-protecting their devices and having different passwords across platforms?

      I believe that this is highly important when technology is used in classrooms. These facts about privacy and taking security measures must be greatly stressed on and taught in classes as it expands the students' digital literacy and minimizes the risks that might happen.

    3. Digital skills would focus on which tool to use (e.g., Twitter) and how to use it (e.g., how to tweet, retweet, use TweetDeck), while digital literacy would include in-depth questions: When would you use Twitter instead of a more private forum? Why would you use it for advocacy? Who puts themselves at risk when they do so?

      This paragraph clearly distinct and explains the difference between digital skills and digital literacy using a great example that is easily understood.

    4. Digital skills focus on what and how. Digital literacy focuses on why, when, who, and for whom.

      Key component for understanding the difference but also the interconnectedness between Digital Skills and Digital Literacy.

    1. Many of the students work part time in addition to studying, but despite this often feel under financial constraint: There’s a few fees you’ve got t

      This is not only what I experiences through all levels of college. It is also what I see as a growing reality and the colleges have not adequately adapted to understanding and supporting this reality.

  11. Mar 2018
    1. civic, critical, creative, and communicative. The other four are cultural, cognitive, constructive, and confidence

      Younger people have many of these skills to a degree that people of my generation are deeply lacking while often not being deliberately taught them, but because of the lack of explicit teaching there can be glaring gaps in these skills, especially norms around respect.

    2. Teaching digital literacy does not mean teaching digital skills in a vacuum, but doing so in an authentic context that makes sense to students

      Context is a critical element for developing digital literacy. Learning by doing is an age old adage and learning in meaningful contexts ensures that the doing part is something that the learner would be doing anyway. Using online referencing tools like Zotero allows a learner to read, make a record of that reading and refer to that in an essay. At the same time they can learn about online and offline tools and synchronisation, sharing, commenting, co-operation, cultural norms of accrediting ideas, licensing, browser extensions, and confidence in setting up and utilising digital applications. The learner wants to ensure they have references for their essay. They get this and develop their digital skills and literacies at the same time without being 'taught'.

    3. Digital literacy is not about the skills of using technologies, but how we use our judgment to maintain awareness of what we are reading and writing, why we are doing it, and whom we are addressing.

      This is so true many people don't think about the logic and reasoning as to why they choose to do what they want with devices. People don't look at all the possibilities when it comes to posting that picture or editing it... There's just so much with technology it can be scary.

    4. I place students in authentic situations as much as possible.

      I do this as well for info lit sessions - the students aren't going to retain the information if you don't give them hands on experience using the tools in conjunction with the newly discovered literacy ability.

    5. Moreover, it is worth discussing how to enhance accessibility of students’ digital content. Are they cognizant of using fonts that are easy to read? Are they conscious of accessible color schemes? Do they know to provide alternative text to images?

      There are whole websites devoted to running accessibility tests and yet so few of our websites and content there in is truly accessible. I think of students I know and the complaints they have voiced over struggling to read busy pages, or pages with too sharp a contrast.

    6. It is important for students to recognize that although technology gives us a lot of power, it also restricts us in many ways, and we need to question how the affordances of technology modify our communication and our behavior.

      This is a point of great interest to me. I am interested to hear ideas about how we can develop this understanding among students and all users of the internet.

    7. We also need to recognize the risks of blogging/tweeting, which include opening avenues for abuse.

      This is something that I always think about before I write anything online. In the past many students have told me that trolling and online abuse is just normal—perhaps that shows that while they knew how to use many digital tools, they didn't have strong digital literacy.

    8. Digital skills would focus on which tool to use (e.g., Twitter) and how to use it (e.g., how to tweet, retweet, use TweetDeck), while digital literacy would include in-depth questions: When would you use Twitter instead of a more private forum? Why would you use it for advocacy? Who puts themselves at risk when they do so?

      This a great example to show the difference between digital skills and digital literacy. I like the example because reflects a very common situation in social media.

    1. there muist be the temptation

      Part of our current info lit sessions teaches students to pass on documentation and articles that contain typos. While I enjoy the CARS acronym and it's CAFE add-on here, I think it is a bit much to expect a student to read over all of this. I will certainly be looking for more information on its application in the classroom setting.

    2. Accuracy The goal of the accuracy test is to assure that the information is actually correct: up to date, factual, detailed, exact, and comprehensive.

      Accuracy is the single most important thing you can find online, although it's almost impossible. One bad source can discredit an entire report/paper/essay as it bleeds through with misinformation and non-credible sources.

    1. teaches her students to execute critical thinking no matter where they are doing their online research.

      As part of our info lit sessions, at my employing institution, we teach students that they can possibly utilize the bibliography and build up subject terms from Wikipedia. The caveat is indeed that we are trying to get the to think critically, while doing this - if it isn't appearing anywhere else, it's probably too good to be true.

    2. today’s climate of “fake” and biased news.

      This is a good point, the news has always been biased, the ease that people can create and share information has made this a huge issue.

    3. “Scholarly inquiry requires analyzing information for credibility and understanding if an online resource is primary, secondary or irrelevant,” Pasquini writes.

      Digital literacy assists with this, being able to see if a source is credible, by fact checking with other sources as well.

    4. “We need to change the conversation from one of abstinence to intelligent information consumption

      Henceforth, the importance of digital literacy, summed up in a basic sentence, especially when dealing with Wikipedia.

    1. Well, where to begin? My experience of #lida101 has demonstrated that my learning style has changed dramatically from my previous experience in formal learning environments. This course has taught me that I am an inconsistent learner (I didn’t always follow  instructions, learning plans or syllabus prompts, nor did I complete all the tasks). I have to acknowledge that I no longer follow a linear pattern of learning. Somewhat embarrassingly, I have become that student that just does their own thing, pottering around distractedly, probably much to the frustration of the t

      I can relate to this so much. It's been about 10 years since I've actually been in a college classroom and I miss it because everyone has their own learning styles and I like being around people. But what I've learned about doing this online course about myself is while I am that student who does go off track and does her own thing I don't necessarily think that it's a bad thing. And I say that because we are creating our own personal learning environment and that does mean us branching out into different places and doing different things. Learning in this digital age you have so many resources in there so many people to communicate with but at the end of the day it's still just you working with that piece of technology. And I've always been one to March to the Beat of My Own Drum and do my own thing but I've learned lots of different things and I will continue to learn different things despite my faults. I hope you can relate.

    1. K-12 school districts are starting to not just adopt, but to focus on teaching teachers how to effectively use OER in ways that improve student learning.

      I'm curious about how widespread this integration into "teaching the teachers" is in other countries, especially in the Pacific region. While their does appear to be some uptake by primary & secondary educators, it doesn't yet appear widespread in this region yet.

    1. A bottom-up approach driven by faculty and embraced by college administrators is far more likely to lead to changes that will be broadly accepted on campus and endure

      So it means finding advocates within an institution, and supporting them with their open textbook projects, as well as giving them the support & tools to advocate to their administration about the benefits of OpenTextbooks.

      One concern for academics might be that their work on zero-textbooks is not recognized as a legitimate academic activity that contributes towards tenure or performance-based funding - how can we support their argument that it is valid?

    2. with the average U.S. college student now spending $1200 each year on textbooks and other course materials on top of tuition,

      This is an extreme cost, and this was written in 2015 so fees have only sky rockted since then, which makes OpenStax an amazing resource for students needing textbooks.

    1. Millennial students seem to prefer badging and certificate programs to traditional bachelor’s degrees

      Students are searching for alternative credits which add to their degrees or perhaps help in some way when they graduate.

    1. Website detailing alternative credits and how they can improve upon degrees.

    2. The thing that is important to note is that this is a “both and” not an “either or” scenario.

      In the OERu context, this is an important point. Many OERu micro-credentials are mapped to formal academic credit towards university qualifications.

    1. MOOC provider offering career education and prepartion courses and provides skill set education.

    1. . There is little diversity among editors. According to a 2009 survey by the Wikimedia Foundation, 87 percent of Wikipedia editors are male, with an average age of 26.8 years. According to executive director Sue Gardner, they hail mostly from Europe and North America, and many of them are in graduate school. Although most of these editors are undoubtedly intelligent and passionate about enhancing the accuracy of Wikipedia, the site falls far short of its ideals of providing “the sum of all human knowledge” without the broad perspectives that a more diversified pool of editors would bring.

      An issue with all things tech-related.

    1. (inserting false, defamatory or biased statements into biographies) have attracted publicity.[2][3]

      Always double check sources, as using one bad source can discredit anything it's used on. This also basically sums up the entire article and is evidence of why digital literacy is so imperative.

    1. This work explores the connection between psychological well-being and Internet use in older adults

      This could be an interesting research topic.

    1. Those capabilities that mean an individual is fit for living, learning and working in a digital society. Digital literacy is about being able to make use of technologies to participate in and contribute to modern social, cultural, political and economic life.'

      Defining digital literacy.

    1. This includes individuals who create or adapt OER for their own teaching and learning purposes; nonprofit OER publishers and libraries; commercial OER publishers; as well as educational technology vendors looking to incorporate OER into their products or services.

      The OER ecosystem comprises many players with different goals, and that's fine. For this reason I think the CARE values are important for building a thriving and sustainable network.

  12. Feb 2018
    1. Twitter instead of

      Or for example, the implications of choosing a proprietary tool like Twitter versus using an open source service like Mastodon.

    2. Who puts themselves at risk when they do so?

      Digital literacy involves assessing the risks associated with actions you take online.

    3. Digital skills focus on what and how. Digital literacy focuses on why, when, who, and for whom.

      Skills versus literacy

    4. Digital literacies are not solely about technical proficiency but about the issues, norms, and habits of mind surrounding technologies used for a particular purpose. —Doug Belshaw, educational researcher

      Digital skills, literacy, and fluency are interdependent.

  13. Sep 2017
    1. It was a way of both encouraging one another to remain critical and supporting one another through adversity in creative ways.

      At the time of the Arab Spring it may have been a very effective tool for speaking out but now I personally believe that social networks are constantly watched by governments because I know people who have private posts on facebook who were tracked down and arrested for political posts. Therefore, the reliability of social media as a means of voicing opinions about controversial matters has become highly questionable to me.

    2. It is important for students to recognize that although technology gives us a lot of power, it also restricts us in many ways, and we need to question how the affordances of technology modify our communication and our behavior.

      We are blinded in seeing the downsides to using technology since it has become an essential part of our lives and not questioning the risks of what can go wrong e.g. hacking etc. can lead to serious problems because people don't think twice about what they say or post online and how troublesome it can be if it falls in the wrong hands.

    3. Digital skills focus on what and how. Digital literacy focuses on why, when, who, and for whom.

      The for whom part made me realize that most people our age who's daily lives are dependent on technology are not very digitally literate even though we may be highly skilled. This is because the majority of us don't really think about how posting things on the internet are accessible by everyone and sometimes it can be really hard to limit the audience.

    4. Digital literacy is not about the skills of using technologies, but how we use our judgment to maintain awareness of what we are reading and writing, why we are doing it, and whom we are addressing.

      Significant when discussing digital literacies as being mindful and alert/aware is a crucial aspect.

    5. digital skills would include showing students how to download images from the Internet and insert them into PowerPoint slides or webpages. Digital literacy would focus on helping students choose appropriate images, recognize copyright licensing, and cite or get permissions, in addition to reminding students to use alternative text for images to support those with visual disabilities.

      Clear example when representing the difference between digital skills and digital literacy, as it conveys that both terms have distinctive goals and purposes.

    6. to use alternative text for images to support those with visual disabilities.

      This is something that everyone must strive to learn because you have to be able to include everyone when sharing information. This also raises awareness that there are people with different abilities and that they should not she excluded because of them.

    7. teaching digital skills would include showing students how to download images from the Internet and insert them into PowerPoint slides or webpages. Digital literacy would focus on helping students choose appropriate images, recognize copyright licensing, and cite or get permissions

      I found this example to be insightful because coming to think about it now, in school all we were taught were the skills but our teachers never thought that it would be useful for us in this day and age to be digitally literate.

    8. When is it best to do a Google search versus ask a question on Twitter? Why would students tweet to a particular hashtag or person versus another? When they tweet to people from another country in another time zone, what kind of context do they need to consider? What should they add, remove, or modify in order to communicate better?

      This is significant because it portrays the importance of highlighting the different platforms being used depending on the task. Nowadays many people consider social media as a package, resulting in an excess of information regarding the individual, literally all over the internet.

    9. We should not be throwing students into the public domain to discuss sensitive topics without having conversations with them on what they might face and which of these risks they are willing to take, how they would handle it, and how they might support each other.

      This is extremely important especially with students who were born into this technological world, those who see it as the norm. We, or actually i myself was able to experience a technology free childhood and that is why i take my precautions when using any public domain because i understand what might happen but younger children who see the internet as a part of their everyday lives must be educated on its dangers.

    10. confidence

      I believe not only confidence but also mutual respect.

    11. Digital skills focus on what and how. Digital literacy focuses on why, when, who, and for whom.

      I believe that both are interlinked. To be able to be digitally literate one must be digitally skilled.

    12. It is important for students to recognize that although technology gives us a lot of power, it also restricts us in many ways, and we need to question how the affordances of technology modify our communication and our behavior.

      I really liked this part as, with the power of technology, some people might think that they are actually more free, to communicate or to behave in the way in which they see as appropriate, however they might not see that their own behaviors might offend someone, and could cause even more serious problems.

    13. Digital literacy is not about the skills of using technologies, but how we use our judgment to maintain awareness of what we are reading and writing, why we are doing it, and whom we are addressing.

      I believe that digital literacy is co-dependent on the individual's own views, norms, and experiences. Therefore, it is important to teach digital skills while teaching those important aspects of digital literacies that they might not have been aware of such as privacy, when to post and talk about a certain issue and when not to, who to address, etc.

    14. Digital literacies are not solely about technical proficiency but about the issues, norms, and habits of mind surrounding technologies used for a particular purpose.

      It very true to understand the difference between digital literacy and digital skills. In the past, I was ignorant about this issue and never thought about it them as being two separate terms. Skills is like giving someone a paintbrush and show them how to paint a tree, then the literacy would be applied when the student start reflecting on their emotions, experience, and their still life view to paint a unique piece of painting. Inspiring the student to understand digital literacy is very important for them to learn beyond what they have learned in class and some of the assignments.

    15. Digital literacies are not solely about technical proficiency

      This is a key message - digital literacies are much more than digital skills. The concept is also culturally bounded taking into account the social norms of the respective communities. Can you think of any examples? Please share by replying to this annotation.

    1. academic skill requirements and how they would be assessed

      This emphasises the importance of reading the criteria of the marking rubric to determine what academic skills will be assessed.

    2. The International Journal of the First Year in Higher Education

      This is an open access journal, therefore we have permissions to host an online copy of the article.

    3. he skills necessary for higher education (Horstmanshof & Brownie, 2013), particularly as students are entering deg

      The OERu's Learning in a Digital Age course was developed to respond to this need.

    1. zero-textbook-cost degrees

      The zero-textbook cost degrees will save learners millions of dollars. The OERu takes this one step further by assembling full online courses based entirely on OER. Of interest, if you have studied at university before, how much money did you spend on average per year purchasing proprietary textbooks? In the past, have you decided not to purchase a prescribed text because it was too expensive?

    1. improve learning through teaching practices that are enabled by content that is freely available to copy, edit and share.

      Thinking about what open can do that can't be easily be replicated using "closed" models is key - because this is the strategic point of difference for OER. This LiDA course is a good example - learners are encouraged to source open access materials in pursuit of their own interests rather than prescribing a closed textbook. Can you think of other examples that open enables?

    1. peer review process

      LiDA is a tertiary education course and as such we place a high value on peer reviewed research. Its always a good idea to check the respective journal's review processes online. See for example the Peer Review Process for IRRODL: http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess

  14. Aug 2017
    1. Librem 5, the phone that focuses on security by design and privacy protection by default. Running Free/Libre and Open Source software and a GNU+Linux Operating System designed to create an open development utopia, rather than the walled gardens from all other phone providers.

      This is relevant to anyone uncomfortable with the degree of control multinational corporations have over their digital identity, which is increasingly becoming peoples' main identity.