7 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2018
    1. Yammer is Web 2.0 software which integrates with Microsoft 360 and allows users to communicate together and across the organization. It essentially functions as social networking software for corporations with the ability to collaborate on projects, maintain task lists, store files, documents and pictures all within a private enterprise network. In addition Yammer allows for the sharing of feedback and the management of group projects. Yammer is freemium software with a variety of custom add-ons. Licenses are currently issued for all learner participants and at this time no custom add-ons are necessary.

      RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  2. Jul 2016
  3. Apr 2016
    1. If, at the dawn of the web, I was to take a list of things the web would bring about and show them to a researcher, they might disagree on the level of interest people would have in things (what’s with the cat pictures, spaceman?) but there’d be little there to surprise them except for one item: the most used reference work in the world will be collaboratively maintained by a group of anonymous and pseudonymous volunteers as part of a self-organizing network.

      It would be nice if on this day, as we marvel about the rise of Wikipedia, we could turn some of our attention to the Wikipedias of the future. Where are opportunities for this mode of collaboration that we’ve missed? Why are we not confronted by more impossible things? How can we move from the electronic dreams of the 1970s to visions informed by the lessons of wiki and Wikipedia? Some people might think we’ve already done that. But I’m pretty sure we’re barely getting started.

  4. Jan 2016
  5. Dec 2015
  6. May 2015
    1. I first discovered the power of collaborative annotation

      Collins actually imagines a moment of shared marginalia in his poem. In a copy of A Catcher in the Rye that he borrows from a library as a boy, he finds the following: “Pardon the egg salad stains, but I’m in love.” The young Collins imagines the note to be written by a beautiful girl and feels himself in a sense falling in love with that other reader. Though we need not develop a dating service out of the modern technologies that allow for social reading, we can at least see the humanity that can be shared in the margin of a digital page: the teachable moments, the conversations that might occur. We have glimpsed such moments on other social media like Twitter and Facebook, but I argue they lack the depth of annotation, which brings together text, comment, and now, readers.