13 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2019
    1. Kenneth Burke

      Another way he attempts to define rhetoric strikes my fancy: the use of words by human agents to form attitudes or to induce actions in other human agents."

    2. identification

      can burke"s identification be seen as a rhetorical theory or concept and if so what is the difference?

  2. Apr 2018
    1. Edmund Burke

      Edmund Burke was a British statesman, political thinker, and Parliamentary orator who was active in the major political issues occurring in Britain in 1785. He was part of the controversy between King George III and Parliament, who, he believed, were attempting to exert too much control over the executive. He argued that though the king's actions did not legally defy the constitution, they went against the constitution in spirit. Similarly, during the American imperial crisis, Burke argued that the British government's treatment of the colonies followed the letter of the law, but lacked consistency and respect for the colonies' claims.

      As a Whig Parliamentarian, Burke supported Americans grievances against Great Britain, especially in the area of taxation. However, he criticized the French Revolution for being destructive to society.

  3. Apr 2017
    1. networkculture.Everythingusesandisused,andthereisnoclearboundarybetweentheoneandtheother.

      Re: my microresponse from 3/11 regarding Perelman, Burke, networks, community, and social fabric

  4. Mar 2017
    1. a network [une grille]

      Nice, I like the appearance of "network" here in this musing about "code", especially after our last class discussion about ambiguity ("code" is inherently ambiguous...) being entangled with itself, and ultimately supported by "spider webs" and "nets" and "molten masses" of various communications, à la Burke and Perelman.

    1. In brief, we have to guess them and we guess much better when we realize we are guess-ing, and watch out for indications, than when we think we know.7

      Burke appears to believe the same; if you realize that what you're are doing is rhetorical, then your rhetoric will be good, or better.

    2. Good use is the general, present-day practice of the best writers." One bone we could pick would be with that "best." How are they the best writers except by using the words in the best ways? We settle that they are the best writers because we find them using their words successfully. We do not settle that theirs is the right, the "good usage" of the words because they use them so.
  5. May 2015
    1. The orator has little use for an imaginative world three inches in diameter. His world must be twenty feet in diameter and must include every atom of his own

      This talk about "diameter" reminds me of Burke's notions of "circumference."

  6. Feb 2014
    1. The conservative influence of property does not, however, depend on primogeniture or even inheritance -- features that gave property a valuable role in Burke's political system as well as in the political theories advanced by Hegel and Plato. n11 Within a single lifetime, property tends to make the property owner more risk-averse. This aversion applies both to public decisions [*291] affecting property, such as taxes, and to personal decisions that might diminish one's property, such as investment strategies and career choices. Inheritance and capital appreciation are only additional characteristics of traditional notions of property that tend to stabilize social stratification.
    2. In the eighteenth century, Edmund Burke argued that property stabilized society and prevented political and social turmoil that, he believed, would result from a purely meritocratic order. n8 Property served as a counterweight protecting the class of persons who possessed it against competition from nonpropertied people of natural ability and talent. To Burke, the French National Assembly -- dominated by upstart lawyers from the provinces -- exemplified the risk of disorder and inexperience of an unpropertied leadership. n9 In contrast, the British parliament, a proper mix of talented commoners and propertied Lords, ruled successfully.
    3. Intellectual property is far more egalitarian. Of limited duration and obtainable by anyone, intellectual property can be seen as a reward, an empowering instrument, for the talented upstarts Burke sought to restrain. Intellectual property is often the propertization of what we call "talent." It tends to shift the balance toward the talented newcomers whom Burke mistrusted

      intellectual property is often the propertization of what we call talent.