27 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2019
    1. It is much harder to struggle against irrelevance than against exploitation

      This is how the British could rule India for about 300 years

  2. May 2018
    1. Thanks in large part to the massive popularity of “The Great British Baking Show,” Brits now, as Ptak herself has noted, have developed a taste for cakes beyond “stale sponges.”

      Great British Baking Show changes society!

  3. Mar 2018
  4. Nov 2017
    1. “Including open in the list of examples for educational leadership is important because it brings it to the forefront. When I went up for promotion, I took a risk because engaging in open practice was not listed as an example of educational leadership, but not everyone is going to do that. Whereas if it’s strictly laid out it raises the profile for those who haven’t thought about open education and also shows that it is valued by the university as being a form of educational leadership,”
    2. Excerpt from the UBC Guide to Reappointment, Promotion and Tenure Procedures (RPT): Evidence of educational leadership is required for tenure/promotion in the Educational Leadership stream… It can include, but is not limited to…Contributions to the practice and theory of teaching and learning literature, including publications in peer-reviewed and professional journals, conference publications, book chapters, textbooks and open education repositories / resources.
  5. Oct 2017
    1. the slow collapse of public health and education, resurgent child poverty, the epidemic of loneliness, the collapse of ecosystems

      It is the same as what we learnt before from British economy history. Under the rule of Mrs. Thatcher, through the destruction of labor movement and opening foreign competition to weak the forces of global trade. Inducing the heavy industry system, the large state-owned enterprises carry out radical privatization reform and other measures to complete the transformation of economic structure, So that the British from a traditional heavy industrial countries, into a service-oriented emerging economies. Mrs. Thatcher has focused on weakening public spending such as education, health care and social welfare, and she claims to "turn Britain from a society of interdependence to a self-sustaining society." Under her leadership, Britain has gradually become a country with relatively cheap labor and flexible labor. However, as it shows today, British people are facing an unreasonable high retirement age and suffering from dramatic social classes gap.

  6. Sep 2017
    1. This book is not about religion, although I talk about religion. It's about religious tolerance and the fight for human rights; the first battlefront in public discourse about human rights.

      Freedom of religion was the first base upon which other understandings of freedom have been built upon.

    2. Research and background

      "Not knowing is an obstacle to my imagination" RE: his dedication to narratives that could have taken place within the political climate of the day.

    3. This is the story of 16th century Europe, and the political earthquake that was protestantism. The overarching historical narrative unfolds around the lives of fictional characters who might have lived in this historic period.

      Follett's literary reenactment explores the intricacies of the Protestant Reformation through a cast of strategically diverse characters, whose stories span across multiple continents, nations, and cities. Each character is an important harbinger of larger historical trends. Within the masterfully established geo-political reality, each of their decisions serve to gradually reveal their distinct personalities and temperaments, belief systems and ideologies, and cultural identities.

    4. The real enemies, then as now, are not the rival religions. The true battle pitches those who believe in tolerance and compromise against the tyrants who would impose their ideas on everyone else—no matter what the cost.

      Reminiscent of our current geo-political climate. The extended cycles of history.

  7. May 2016
  8. Sep 2015
    1. Nathan Cole, The Spiritual Travels of Nathan Cole, 1761.

      Study Question:

      Do you think the scene that Cole describes is related or similar to more current day religious practice?

      How does Cole come to see himself being “saved”? Is it related to a particular church or church authority? How might Cole’s experience be a threat to established church authorities?

      In the 1730s and 1740s many rural folk rejected the enlightened and rational religion that came from the cosmopolitan pulpits and port cities of British North America. Instead, they were attracted to the evangelical religious movement that became known as the Great Awakening. The English Methodist George Whitefield and other itinerant ministers ignited this popular movement with their speaking tours of the colonies. In this account farmer Nathan Cole described hearing the news of Whitefield’s approach to his Connecticut town, as fields emptied and the populace converged: “I saw no man at work in his field, but all seemed to be gone. ” Like many others during the Great Awakening, Cole achieved an eventual conversion by focusing not on intellectual issues but on emotional experience. Cole took away an egalitarian message about the spiritual equality of all before God, a message that confronted established authorities.

    1. IV. Pursuing Political, Religious and Individual Freedom

      Week 7 Video Lecture

      Study Questions for this section:

      What were the three different colonial political structures and how did they function?

      How did the elected assemblies differ from Parliament in England?

      How did changes in marriage, print and religion affect the colonists ideas about their obligations to authority?

    1. First Hand Accounts Case Study

      Study Questions:

      How do these descriptions of the “Middle Passage” from slave narratives confirm your understanding of the previous readings of this week?

      How do these conditions lead to rebellion?

    1. Bacon’s Rebellion: The Declaration (1676)

      How does Bacon's Declaration reflect both his distrust of Berkeley's rule and his desire to wage war against Native Americans? Why does Bacon want to wage this war?

  9. Aug 2015
    1. Crown.

      Study Questions:

      How did Powhatan initially receive the colonists? Why?

      How does tobacco change the colony?

      How does the notion of race begin to change in the colony?

    2. Crown.

      Study Questions:

      How did Powhatan initially receive the colonists? Why?

      How does tobacco change the colony?

      How does the notion of race begin to change in the colony?

    3. New World.

      Study Question:

      What were the reasons that England entered in the competition for empire in the Americas?

    4. IV. English Colonization

      Before reading this text watch and annotate the following video lecture for this week. Make sure you can answer the study questions that will appear within the video:

      The Growth of British North America video lecture:

    5. New World

      Study Question:

      What was the "Black Legend" and how did other European powers use it to justify their attempts to compete with Spain for empire in the Americas?

    1. power.

      Study Question:

      How do the colonies attempt to remain independent from the religious and political turmoil in England during the 1600s?

    2. power.

      Study Question:

      How do the colonies attempt to remain independent from the religious and political turmoil in England during the 1600s?

  10. Jul 2015
  11. Feb 2014
    1. In the eighteenth century, Edmund Burke argued that property stabilized society and prevented political and social turmoil that, he believed, would result from a purely meritocratic order. n8 Property served as a counterweight protecting the class of persons who possessed it against competition from nonpropertied people of natural ability and talent. To Burke, the French National Assembly -- dominated by upstart lawyers from the provinces -- exemplified the risk of disorder and inexperience of an unpropertied leadership. n9 In contrast, the British parliament, a proper mix of talented commoners and propertied Lords, ruled successfully.