48 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2020
    1. Informal Learning in the Workplace: Key Activities and Processes

      Cunningham, J., & Hillier, E. (2013). Informal Learning in the Workplace: Key Activities and Processes. Education & Training, 55(1), 37–51

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=eric&AN=EJ1005919&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      The purpose of this study is to define characteristics and processes that enhance informal learning in a public sector workplace. Design/methodology/approach: Based on interviews and questionnaires, the authors solicited examples of informal learning practices that 40 supervisors experienced during their careers. The examples were content analyzed to define seven broad themes underlying informal learning. Findings: The findings illustrate seven broad themes describing learning activities and processes. The first three themes describe the types of informal learning activities that supervisors found valuable: relationships; learning opportunities enlarging or redesigning their jobs; and enrichment opportunities that provided higher levels of managerial learning. Four themes describe processes for facilitating informal learning: planning processes; active learning and modelling; relationship dynamics; and tying learning to applications. Originality/value: The value of this study is in presenting a possible framework defining informal learning that describes both activities (the what) and the underlying processes (the how) by which they are delivered. Beyond this, it suggests that there is a close connection between the activities and the processes underlying them.

      8/10

    1. Knowledge recommendation for workplace learning: a system design and evaluation perspective

      Shuang Geng, Lijing Tan, Ben Niu, Yuanyue Feng, & Li Chen. (2019). Knowledge recommendation for workplace learning: a system design and evaluation perspective. Internet Research, 30(1), 243–261. https://doi.org/10.1108/INTR-07-2018-0336

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      Purpose Although digitalization in the workplace is burgeoning, tools are needed to facilitate personalized learning in informal learning settings. Existing knowledge recommendation techniques do not account for dynamic and task-oriented user preferences. The purpose of this paper is to propose a new design of a knowledge recommender system (RS) to fill this research gap and provide guidance for practitioners on how to enhance the effectiveness of workplace learning. Design/methodology/approach This study employs the design science research approach. A novel hybrid knowledge recommendation technique is proposed. An experiment was carried out in a case company to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed system design. Quantitative data were collected to investigate the influence of personalized knowledge service on users’ learning attitude. Findings The proposed personalized knowledge RS obtained satisfactory user feedback. The results also show that providing personalized knowledge service can positively influence users’ perceived usefulness of learning. Practical implications This research highlights the importance of providing digital support for workplace learners. The proposed new knowledge recommendation technique would be useful for practitioners and developers to harness information technology to facilitate workplace learning and effect organization learning strategies. Originality/value This study expands the scope of research on RS and workplace learning. This research also draws scholarly attention to the effective utilization of digital techniques, such as a RS, to support user decision making in the workplace.

      7/10

    1. Informal learning in the workplace : The key role of managers

      Informal learning in the workplace : The key role of managers. (2014). Development and Learning in Organizations, 28(2), 26–28. https://doi.org/10.1108/DLO-02-2014-0007

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      – Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies. – This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context. – A manager's lot is a tough one at the best of times. There is constant pressure to meet business and client needs, often against a backdrop of constantly dwindling resources. Economic uncertainty has ensured that this balancing act has become even more precarious in recent years. Delivering more for much less is very much the order of the day. Certain areas are notoriously vulnerable when the budget axe is wielded. Training and development is a perfect example. However, this is clearly something of a false economy as few companies will be best positioned to move forward if talent is not properly nurtured. Such short-term thinking continues to prevail though. – Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations. – The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to digest format.

      8/10

    1. Social interactions and workplace learning : The influence of job demands and job resources

      Social interactions and workplace learning : The influence of job demands and job resources. (2020). Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, 34(3), 31–33. https://doi.org/10.1108/DLO-11-2019-0275

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      Purpose This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies. Design/methodology/approach This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context. Findings Businesses that place strong emphasis on workplace learning become better positioned to succeed. Social interactions play a critical role in enabling the informal learning identified as an important aspect of learning overall. Leaders should therefore design tasks to enable such interaction which can become more significant still within culturally heterogeneous firms. Originality/value The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

    1. Informal learning in work environments: training with the Social Web in the workplace.

      Garcia-Penalvo, F. J., Colomo-Palacios, R., & Lytras, M. D. (2012). Informal Learning in Work Environments: Training with the Social Web in the Workplace. Behaviour & Information Technology, 31(8), 753–755.

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      The Internet and its increasing usage has changed informal learning in depth. This change has affected young and older adults in both the workplace and in higher education. But, in spite of this, formal and non-formal course-based approaches have not taken full advantage of these new informal learning scenarios and technologies. The Web 2.0 is a new way for people to communicate across the Internet. Communication is a means of transformation and knowledge exchange. These are the facts that cannot be obviated by the organisations in their training programmes and knowledge management. This special issue is devoted to investigating how informal learning changes or influences online information in Social Web and training strategies in institutions. In order to do so, five papers will present different approaches of informal learning in the workplace regarding Web 2.0 capabilities.

    1. Workplace Learning: The Roles of Knowledge Accessibility and Management

      Li, J., Brake, G., Champion, A., Fuller, T., Gabel, S., & Hatcher-Busch, L. (2009). Workplace Learning: The Roles of Knowledge Accessibility and Management. Journal of Workplace Learning, 21(4), 347–364.

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      Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how knowledge management systems have been used by the studied organizations to improve knowledge accessibility and knowledge sharing in order to increase workplace learning. Design/methodology/approach: The study relies on a qualitative multisite case study method. Data were obtained from five organizations at a southern state in the USA. Multiple interviews, onsite observation, and documentation analyses were conducted at each studied organization. Data analysis used open coding and thematic analysis. Results were triangulated based on multiple data sources. Findings: The findings revealed that the learning environment of an organization is important for workplace learning. All studied organizations share a need for a conversion of tacit to explicit knowledge in order to facilitate effective informal learning in the workplace. This research concludes that engineering the learning environment through effective knowledge management should be a cohesive effort of the entire organization and demands congruent support from all levels of the organization. Originality/value: The study expands the understanding of issues related to workplace learning through knowledge accessibility in both business and academic settings. To improve workplace learning, one should not just stipulate technology interventions; other factors, such as the organization's design, work design, and the culture/vision of the organization, all play important roles in the creation of a learning organization that will induce informal learning in the workplace.

      6/10

    1. Workplace Learning in Informal Networks

      Milligan, C., Littlejohn, A., & Margaryan, A. (2014). Workplace Learning in Informal Networks. Journal of Interactive Media in Education.

      Learning does not stop when an individual leaves formal education, but becomes increasingly informal, and deeply embedded within other activities such as work. This article describes the challenges of informal learning in knowledge intensive industries, highlighting the important role of personal learning networks. The article argues that knowledge workers must be able to self-regulate their learning and outlines a range of behaviours that are essential to effective learning in informal networks. The article identifies tools that can support these behaviours in the workplace and how they might form a personal work and learning environment.

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      7/10

    1. Scaling informal learning at the workplace: A model and four designs from a large-scale design-based research effort 

      Ley, T., Cook, J., Dennerlein, S., Kravcik, M., Kunzmann, C., Pata, K., Purma, J., Sandars, J., Santos, P., Schmidt, A., Al-Smadi, M., & Trattner, C. (2014). Scaling Informal Learning at the Workplace: A Model and Four Designs from a Large-Scale Design-Based Research Effort. British Journal of Educational Technology, 45(6), 1036–1048.

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      Workplace learning happens in the process and context of work, is multi-episodic, often informal, problem based and takes place on a just-in-time basis. While this is a very effective means of delivery, it also does not scale very well beyond the immediate context. We review three types of technologies that have been suggested to scale learning and three connected theoretical discourses around learning and its support. Based on these three strands and an in-depth contextual inquiry into two workplace learning domains, health care and building and construction, four design-based research projects were conducted that have given rise to designs for scaling informal learning with technology. The insights gained from the design and contextual inquiry contributed to a model that provides an integrative view on three informal learning processes at work and how they can be supported with technology: (1) task performance, reflection and sensemaking; (2) help seeking, guidance and support; and (3) emergence and maturing of collective knowledge. The model fosters our understanding of how informal learning can be scaled and how an orchestrated set of technologies can support this process.

    1. Informal Learning in the Workplace: A Review of the Literature

      In the last few decades, the workplace has been increasingly recognised as a legitimate environment for learning new skills and knowledge, which in turn enables workers to participate more effectively in ever-changing work environments. Within the workplace, there is the potential for continuous learning to occur not only through formal learning initiatives that are associated with training, but also through informal learning opportunities that are embedded within everyday work activities. This paper surveys the growing body of literature on informal learning, makes some critical observations about the importance of informal learning, and explains the various ways that informal learning can occur in the workplace.

      https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ952000

    1. Blended learning: Efficient, timely and cost effective

      (Click Download full-text PDF to read.) In this article, the authors discuss the blended learning instructional delivery method. Through case study, the authors demonstrate the benefits of blended course design. Furthermore, the article addresses potential detriments (financial, instructional design) of a blended course design. A brief review of considerations and recommendations for a blended design was provided. Though this article focuses on the relationship to forensic science, the information is applicable across disciplines and delivery venues (corporate, academic). (6/10)

  2. Sep 2020
  3. Aug 2020
  4. Jul 2020
  5. Jun 2020
    1. Kniffin, K. M., Narayanan, J., Anseel, F., Antonakis, J., Ashford, S., Bakker, A. B., Bamberger, P., Bapuji, H., Bhave, D. P., Choi, V. K., Creary, S. J., Demerouti, E., Flynn, F., Gelfand, Mi., Greer, L., Johns, G., Kesebir, S., Klein, P. G., Lee, S. Y., … van vugt, mark. (2020). COVID-19 and the Workplace: Implications, Issues, and Insights for Future Research and Action [Preprint]. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/gkwme

  6. May 2020
  7. Apr 2020
  8. Feb 2020
  9. Nov 2019
    1. The chapter examines learning and emotion at work andhow emotional intelligence and emotion work affect well-being, identity development, and power relations.The chapter also considers how human resource develop-ment and emotion interact in learning, training, andchange initiatives.
  10. Sep 2019
  11. Apr 2019
  12. learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com
    1. Workplace-relatedlearningis learning that is related to the firm in which the learner is employed and that is supported at least to some extent by their employer, but that is notfoundationalor higher education. Individuals may engage in this type of learning for the purposeof learning a new job, improving their job performance, for professional development, as an employee benefit or because it is required by legislation.
  13. Mar 2019
    1. 2018 mobile learning This is a Pinterest style presentation of various posts related to mobile learning and its advantages. It relates primarily to adult learning and also includes information about trends and apps. It is neatly presented. rating 5/5

    1. This plain page incorporates an overview of job aids by Allison Rossett, who is the foremost authority on the topic. Not all information is given away for free as she wants to sell her books, which are also promoted on the page. This page can be a good way of tracking her current work. Rating 3/5

  14. Nov 2018
    1. Social-based tools are gaining acceptance in the workplace.

      This article explains how a wiki can be used as a collaborative tool in the workplace. The author explains how they can be used, the advantages, and tips.

      8/10

    1. Facebook Workplace is a direct competitor to Slack; this is a thoughtful exploration of experiences using both; if I decide to include any mention of Facebook, this would be a good springboard to more research (3/5)

      Note: in this scenario both are discussed as business tools not in education but other articles I've found show clear parallels

  15. Mar 2018
  16. Sep 2017
    1. An overwhelming number of companies (64%) indicated that their number one reason for implementing social tools is to support a culture of learning. The next two main motivations are to encourage collaboration and innovation (54%) and connect employees to organization experts (42%).

      Main motivation for adoption of workplace social learning tools.

    1. Workplace learning typically embodies an outside-in approach where a teacher or instructor provides the learner with content, information and ideas

      A generalization not true in all cases especially not with big and advanced organizations. As a trainer, it was always about discovery, experiential, sharing, role playing, projects etc.