15 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2020
    1. Work groups are to be organized so that they match the processes and the competencies required Individual workers will be given sufficient autonomy to make useful decisions Work will take place in a location where it is done with the most efficiency

      Organizational Design Principles for Service Design

  2. Aug 2020
  3. Jun 2020
    1. Kniffin, K. M., Narayanan, J., Anseel, F., Antonakis, J., Ashford, S., Bakker, A. B., Bamberger, P., Bapuji, H., Bhave, D. P., Choi, V. K., Creary, S. J., Demerouti, E., Flynn, F., Gelfand, Mi., Greer, L., Johns, G., Kesebir, S., Klein, P. G., Lee, S. Y., … van vugt, mark. (2020). COVID-19 and the Workplace: Implications, Issues, and Insights for Future Research and Action [Preprint]. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/gkwme

  4. May 2020
    1. We believe everyone deserves to report to exactly one person that knows and understands what you do day to day. The benefit of having a technically competent manager is easily the largest positive influence on a typical worker’s level of job satisfaction. We have a simple functional hierarchy, everyone has one manager that is experienced in their subject matter.
    2. We don't want a matrix organization where you work with a lead day to day but formally report to someone else.
  5. Apr 2020
  6. Nov 2018
    1. Medical groups, managed care organizations, or, most commonly, hospitals often find it attractive to support hospitalist programs. If hospitalists improve quality, shorten lengths of stay, and decrease costs while satisfying patients and other providers, the return on these organizations' investments in hospitalist programs is highly favorable. Over time, it will be critical that professional fee reimbursement rates be adjusted so that a sustainable hospitalist workload creates sufficient income to support a full salary.
    1. As with other forms of value-based health care, patient-centered care requires a shift in the way provider practices and health systems are designed, managed, and reimbursed. In keeping with the tenets of patient-centeredness, this shift neither happens in a vacuum, it driven by traditional hierarchies in which providers or clinicians are the lone authority. Everyone, from the parking valet and environmental services staff to c-suite members, are engaged in the process, which impacts hiring, training, leadership style, and organizational culture. Patient-centered care also represents a shift in the traditional roles of patients and their families from one of passive “order taker” to one of active “team member.” One of the country’s leading proponents of patient-centered care, Dr. James Rickert, has stated that one of the basic tenets of patient-centered care is that “patients know best how well their health providers are meeting their needs.” To that end, many providers are implementing patient satisfaction surveys, patient and family advisory councils, and focus groups, and using the resulting information to continuously improve the way health care facilities and provider practices are designed, managed, and maintained from both a physical and operational perspective so they become centered more on the individual person than on a checklist of services provided. As the popularity of patient- and family-centered health care increases, it is expected that patients will become more engaged and satisfied with the delivery of their care, and evidence of its clinical efficacy should continue to mount.

      Cultural shift to patient-centered care

  7. Sep 2018
  8. Jul 2018
    1. Orlikowski and Yates [34], working in the field of organization studies, build on this point. They argue that time is plural; it can be experienced as objective, quantitative and independent of humankind, but also as subjective, situated and socially constructed.

      Org studies description of multiple temporalities by Orlikowski and Yates.

  9. Jan 2016
    1. Getting and staying healthy involves tending to the people-oriented aspects of leading an organization, so it may sound “fluffy” to hard-nosed executives raised on managing by the numbers. But make no mistake: cultivating health is hard work. And it shouldn’t be confused with other people-related management concepts, such as employee satisfaction or employee engagement.

      I am looking forward to what these authors will provide as a recipe for cultivating health, and how they define organizational health.