14 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2021
    1. One last resource for augmenting our minds can be found in other people’s minds. We are fundamentally social creatures, oriented toward thinking with others. Problems arise when we do our thinking alone — for example, the well-documented phenomenon of confirmation bias, which leads us to preferentially attend to information that supports the beliefs we already hold. According to the argumentative theory of reasoning, advanced by the cognitive scientists Hugo Mercier and Dan Sperber, this bias is accentuated when we reason in solitude. Humans’ evolved faculty for reasoning is not aimed at arriving at objective truth, Mercier and Sperber point out; it is aimed at defending our arguments and scrutinizing others’. It makes sense, they write, “for a cognitive mechanism aimed at justifying oneself and convincing others to be biased and lazy. The failures of the solitary reasoner follow from the use of reason in an ‘abnormal’ context’” — that is, a nonsocial one. Vigorous debates, engaged with an open mind, are the solution. “When people who disagree but have a common interest in finding the truth or the solution to a problem exchange arguments with each other, the best idea tends to win,” they write, citing evidence from studies of students, forecasters and jury members.

      Thinking in solitary can increase one's susceptibility to confirmation bias. Thinking in groups can mitigate this.

      How might keeping one's notes in public potentially help fight against these cognitive biases?

      Is having a "conversation in the margins" with an author using annotation tools like Hypothes.is a way to help mitigate this sort of cognitive bias?

      At the far end of the spectrum how do we prevent this social thinking from becoming groupthink, or the practice of thinking or making decisions as a group in a way that discourages creativity or individual responsibility?

  2. May 2021
    1. Systems for encoding, transmission, and protection of essential knowledge for group survival and cohesion were developed by multiple cultures long before the advent of alphabetic writing.

      Focusing in on the phrase:

      essential knowledge for group survival

      makes me wonder if we haven't evolutionarily primed ourselves to use knowledge and group knowledge in particular to create group cohesion and therefor survival?

      Cross reference: https://hyp.is/LWtjtLhjEeuTqHPwUUMUbA/threadreaderapp.com/thread/1381933685713289216.html and the paper https://www.academia.edu/46814693/The_Signaling_Function_of_Sharing_Fake_Stories

  3. Apr 2021
    1. Depuis le 1er avril 2021, les Directions régionales de la cohésion sociale (DRCS) sont regroupées avec les Directions régionales des entreprises, de la concurrence, de la consommation, du travail et de l’emploi (DIRECCTE) au sein d’une nouvelle structure : les Directions régionales de l’économie, de l’emploi, du travail et des solidarités (DREETS)

      voir La circulaire du Premier ministre du 12 juin 2019

    2. prévention et lutte contre les exclusions
    3. En Île-de-France, la Direction régionale et interdépartementale de l’économie, de l’emploi, du travail et des solidarités (DRIEETS) regroupe au niveau régional les missions de la DIRECCTE et de la DRCS. Au niveau départemental, ces missions sont regroupées dans les unités départementales de la DRIEETS (pour la petite couronne) et dans les directions départementales de l’emploi, du travail et des solidarités (pour la grande couronne).
    4. Depuis le 1er avril 2021, les Directions régionales de la cohésion sociale (DRCS) sont regroupées avec les Directions régionales des entreprises, de la concurrence, de la consommation, du travail et de l’emploi (DIRECCTE) au sein d’une nouvelle structure : les Directions régionales de l’économie, de l’emploi, du travail et des solidarités (DREETS)
  4. Mar 2021
  5. Aug 2020
  6. Jul 2020
    1. O’Connor, D. B., Aggleton, J. P., Chakrabarti, B., Cooper, C. L., Creswell, C., Dunsmuir, S., Fiske, S. T., Gathercole, S., Gough, B., Ireland, J. L., Jones, M. V., Jowett, A., Kagan, C., Karanika‐Murray, M., Kaye, L. K., Kumari, V., Lewandowsky, S., Lightman, S., Malpass, D., … Armitage, C. J. (n.d.). Research priorities for the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond: A call to action for psychological science. British Journal of Psychology, n/a(n/a), e12468. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjop.12468

  7. Jun 2020
  8. May 2020
  9. Sep 2017