23 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2020
  2. Mar 2020
    1. Standardized test scores improved dramatically. In 2006, only 10% of Noyes' students scored "proficient" or "advanced" in math on the standardized tests required by the federal No Child Left Behind law. Two years later, 58% achieved that level. The school showed similar gains in reading. Because of the remarkable turnaround, the U.S. Department of Education named the school in northeast Washington a National Blue Ribbon School. Noyes was one of 264 public schools nationwide given that award in 2009. Michelle Rhee, then chancellor of D.C. schools, took a special interest in Noyes. She touted the school, which now serves preschoolers through eighth-graders, as an example of how the sweeping changes she championed could transform even the lowest-performing Washington schools. Twice in three years, she rewarded Noyes' staff for boosting scores: In 2008 and again in 2010, each teacher won an $8,000 bonus, and the principal won $10,000. A closer look at Noyes, however, raises questions about its test scores from 2006 to 2010. Its proficiency rates rose at a much faster rate than the average for D.C. schools. Then, in 2010, when scores dipped for most of the district's elementary schools, Noyes' proficiency rates fell further than average.
  3. Jan 2019
  4. Jan 2018
  5. Nov 2017
  6. Mar 2017
    1. Bruce Wayne (Ben Affleck) and Aquaman (Jason Momoa) may trade some zingers, but they do it in monochromatic outfits … at night … on rock formations roughly the color of slate. And nearly every other scene hews to the same palette.

      I hadn't thought about it, but it is so true.

  7. Sep 2016
    1. For example,
    2. According to Wenger's analysis,
    3. to document how she works within a network of practices.
    4. and their work environment in one company's office.
    5. r at least they are not merely human
    6. but about relations among elements.
    7. Ideally, once you make this revelation, people will begin to feel an investment

      Intro, DC, IC.

    8. Although the actual means of pursuing this connection is unique to each scholar, there is some tacit agreement about the importance of helping stu-dents see the relevance of public issues in their individual lives.

      DC, IC.

    9. As Jeff Smith recommends in his attempt to combat the political passivity of "illegeracy," people "naturally take an interest in things that affect their lives, particularly if they feel it's up to them how those things will be decided.

      DC, IC.

    10. ,

      DC, IC.

    11. , "

      DC, IC.

    1. The effect of these types of residency requirements is often to exclude people who do not live in a given neighborhood from that neighborhood.

      Most of DC allows for two-hour street parking in neighborhoods without a permit.

    2. Washington, D.C.,128
    3. a public housing project in Hollander Ridge

      There's a fence around the one conspicuous housing project on the new 14th Street. Would be an interesting Built Environment for one of you to work on.

    4. Public education and engagement could also serve to bring more awareness to the fact that the built environment often excludes. This Article seeks to serve that end by offering examples of architectural exclusion with the hope that citizens,

      And its one of the ways you could approach your assignments.

    5. architectural decisions are enduring and hard to change.

      Scary thought!

    6. cation of highways and transit stops, and even residential parking permit requirements can shape the demographics of a city and isolate a neighborhood from those surrounding it, often intentionally.

      How do these work here in DC? How can we find the answers?