51 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Nov 2022
    1. Mark: Cathy Marshall at Xerox PARC originally started speaking about information gardening. She developed an early tool that’s the inspiration for the Tinderbox map view, in which you would have boxes but no lines. It was a spatial hypertext system, a system for connecting things by placing them near each other rather than drawing a line between them. Very interesting abstract representational problem, but also it turned out to be tremendously useful.

      Cathy Marshall was an early digital gardener!

  3. Oct 2022
    1. https://www.denizcemonduygu.com/philo/browse/

      History of Philosophy: Summarized & Visualized

      This could be thought of as a form of digital, single-project zettelkasten dedicated to philosophy. It's got people, sources, and ideas which are cross linked in a Luhmann-sense (without numbering) though not in a topical index-sense. Interestingly it has not only a spatial interface and shows spatial relationships between people and ideas over time using a timeline, but it also indicates—using colored links—the ideas of disagreement/contrast/refutation and agreement/similarity/expansion.

      What other (digital) tools of thought provide these sorts of visualization affordances?

  4. Aug 2022
  5. Apr 2022
    1. https://winnielim.org/library/collections/personal-websites-with-a-notes-section/

      Winnie has some excellent examples of people's websites with notes, similar to that of https://indieweb.org/note. But it feels a bit like she's approaching it from the perspective of deeper ideas and thoughts than one might post to Twitter or other social media. It would be worthwhile looking at examples of people's practices in this space that are more akin to note taking and idea building, perhaps in the vein of creating digital gardens or the use of annotation tools like Hypothes.is?

    1. Most content is typically displayed in these formats:


      What other forms/shapes might it take?

    2. We have to endlessly scroll and parse a ton of images and headlines before we can find something interesting to read.

      The randomness of interesting tidbits in a social media scroll help to put us in a state of flow. We get small hits of dopamine from finding interesting posts to fill in the gaps of the boring bits in between and suddenly find we've lost the day. As a result an endless scroll of varying quality might have the effect of making one feel productive when in fact a reasonably large proportion of your time is spent on useless and uninteresting content.

      This effect may be put even further out when it's done algorithmically and the dopamine hits become more frequent. Potentially worse than this, the depth of the insight found in most social feeds is very shallow and rarely ever deep. One is almost never invited to delve further to find new insights.


      How might a social media stream of content be leveraged to help people read more interesting and complex content? Could putting Jacques Derrida's texts into a social media-like framing create this? Then one could reply to the text by sentence or paragraph with their own notes. This is similar to the user interface of Hypothes.is, but Hypothes.is has a more traditional reading interface compared to the social media space. What if one interspersed multiple authors in short threads? What other methods might work to "trick" the human mind into having more fun and finding flow in their deeper and more engaged reading states?

      Link this to the idea of fun in Sönke Ahrens' How to Take Smart Notes.

  6. Mar 2022
    1. pratik This may be too late to be a Micro Camp topic but does anyone knows if any UX research exists on the ideal post length for a timeline view? Twitter has 280 chars (a remnant from SMS). I think FB truncates after 400 chars. But academic abstracts are 150-300 words (not chars).

      @pratik Mastodon caps at 500 as a default. The information density of the particular language/character set is certainly part of the calculus.

      Here's a few to start (and see their related references): - https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/How-Constraints-Affect-Content%3A-The-Case-of-Switch-Gligoric-Anderson/de77e2b6abae20a728d472744557d722499efef5 - https://www.nature.com/articles/s41599-019-0280-3

    1. And it’s easier to share a personal story when you’re composing it 280 characters at a time and publishing it as you go, without thinking about or knowing where the end may be. It’s at least easier than staring down a blank text editor with no limit and having to decide later how much of a 2,500 word rant is worth sharing, anyway.

      Ideas fill their spaces.

      When writing it can be daunting to see a long blank screen and feel like you've got to fill it up with ideas de novo.

      From the other perspective if you're starting with a smaller space like a Twitter input box or index card you may find that you write too much and require the ability to edit things down to fit the sparse space.


      I do quite like the small space provided by Hypothes.is which has the ability to expand and scroll as you write so that it has the Goldilocks feel of not too small, not too big, but "just right".


      Micro.blog has a feature that starts with a box that can grow with the content. Once going past 280 characters it also adds an optional input box to give the post a title if one wants it to be an article rather than a simple note.


      Link to idea of Occamy from the movie Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them that can grow or shrink to fit the available space: https://harrypotter.fandom.com/wiki/Occamy

  7. Feb 2022
    1. https://every.to/superorganizers/the-fall-of-roam

      A user talks about why they've stopped using Roam Research.

      I suspect that a lot of people have many of the same issues and to a great extent, it's a result of them not understanding the underlying use cases of the problems they're trying to solve.

      This user is focusing on it solving the problem of where one is placing their data in hopes that it will fix all their problems, but without defining the reason why they're using the tool and what problems they hope for it to solve.

      Note taking is a much broader idea space than many suppose.

  8. Jan 2022
    1. 7 Backlinks

      Why are these back "links" not actually HTML links? Annoying. Conjecture: Since this is what you get with creator-controlled presentation, that's one of the reasons why people opt for Twitter et al.

  9. www.npmjs.com www.npmjs.com
    1. The yieldable objects currently supported are: promises thunks (functions) array (parallel execution) objects (parallel execution) generators (delegation) generator functions (delegation) Nested yieldable objects are supported, meaning you can nest promises within objects within arrays, and so on!
    1. As John Palmer points out in his brilliant posts on Spatial Interfaces and Spatial Software, “Humans are spatial creatures [who] experience most of life in relation to space”.

      This truism is certainly much older than John Palmer, but an interesting quote none-the-less.

      It could be useful to meditate on the ideas of "spatial interfaces" and "spatial software" as useful affordances within the application and design spaces.

  10. Dec 2021
    1. For a long time, I believed that my only hope of becoming a professional writer was to find the perfect tool.

      What exactly would be the ideal group of features in a writer's perfect tool? There are many out there for a variety of axes of production, but does anything cover it all?

      Functionality potentially for:

      • taking notes
      • collecting examples
      • memory
        • search or other means of pulling things up at their moment of need
      • outlining functionality
      • arranging and rearranging material
      • spellcheckers
      • grammar checkers
      • other?

      With

      • easy of use
      • efficiency
      • productivity
    2. https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2021/12/20/can-distraction-free-devices-change-the-way-we-write

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Aaron Davis </span> in 📑 Can “Distraction-Free” Devices Change the Way We Write? | Read Write Collect (<time class='dt-published'>12/27/2021 14:09:33</time>)</cite></small>

  11. Nov 2021
    1. Type aliases and interfaces are very similar, and in many cases you can choose between them freely. Almost all features of an interface are available in type, the key distinction is that a type cannot be re-opened to add new properties vs an interface which is always extendable.
  12. Oct 2021
    1. There is a close relation between the conceptual knowledge on which a narrative relies and the notation that it employs. Domain-specific vocabulary directly names relevant concepts. Shorthand notation replaces frequently used words and lengthy sentences that involve these concepts. For example, Newton's laws of motion are commonly written as F=m⋅a

      This part resonates strongly with Victor's enunciation on "how Writing made thought visible". (Previous video at 10'33") and "Mathematical notation made mathematical structure visible" (11'33'") and how the invention of modern mathematics was not because of a particular idea, but because of the equations notation "user interface" (~12'30")

  13. Aug 2021
  14. Jul 2021
    1. Most users crave pleasant UX

      I don't even think that's it. Plenty of people are willing to do with poor UX. (Look at GitHub.) The overriding factor is actually a consistently familiar interface. (Look at GitHub.)

      Related: https://www-archive.mozilla.org/unity-of-interface.html

  15. Jun 2021
    1. The first argument to shared_context (the shared group name) is superfluous. It feels a bit like "what's this argument for again?" (Note that you could still use it with include_context to include the group manually, but it's a bit odd to mix-and-match the approaches).
    1. Once a variable is specified with the use method, access it with EnvSetting.my_var Or you can still use the Hash syntax if you prefer it: EnvSetting["MY_VAR"]
  16. Mar 2021
  17. Feb 2021
    1. provide interfaces so you don’t have to think about them

      Question to myself: Is not having to think about it actually a good goal to have? Is it at odds with making intentional/well-considered decisions?  Obviously there are still many of interesting decisions to make even when using a framework that provides conventions and standardization and makes some decisions for you...

    1. Using a terminus to indicate a certain outcome - in turn - allows for much stronger interfaces across nested activities and less guessing! For example, in the new endpoint gem, the not_found terminus is then wired to a special “404 track” that handles the case of “model not found”. The beautiful thing here is: there is no guessing by inspecting ctx[:model] or the like - the not_found end has only one meaning!
    1. In object-oriented programming, information hiding (by way of nesting of types) reduces software development risk by shifting the code's dependency on an uncertain implementation (design decision) onto a well-defined interface. Clients of the interface perform operations purely through it so if the implementation changes, the clients do not have to change.
    1. Programming to an interface means that when you are presented with some programming interface (be it a class library, a set of functions, a network protocol or anything else) that you keep to using only things guaranteed by the interface. You may have knowledge about the underlying implementation (you may have written it), but you should not ever use that knowledge.
    2. The problem with this is that it creates a strong coupling between your code and the implementation, exactly what the interface was supposed to prevent.
  18. Oct 2020
    1. Interface specifications can be reused through inheritance but implementation need not be.
    2. The existing interface is closed to modifications and new implementations must, at a minimum, implement that interface.
    3. This assumes that the module has been given a well-defined, stable description (the interface in the sense of information hiding).
  19. Sep 2020
  20. Jul 2019
    1. Undo/Redo Have you noticed that Undo support on almost all web applications is either nonexistent or terrible? It's hard to implement, but Core Data solves the problem elegantly. An Undo button encourages users to experiment with the application and not be afraid of making mistakes.

      huh, nice

  21. Feb 2019
    1. And the screens are almost horizontal

      It took quite a long time to get to more tactile interfaces, yet still, predominantly (as I am using a laptop right now) interfacing more of a vertical interface.

  22. Sep 2015