72 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2021
    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Remi Kalir</span> in Annotate Your Syllabus 3.0 (<time class='dt-published'>03/13/2021 14:18:33</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Because annotating a syllabus conveys a message–from day one–that course documents are not static artifacts, that something authored by an instructor is not unwelcoming of feedback, and that student voice is both appreciated and necessary for a shared endeavor.

      This helps to turn the class into a community.

      It also establishes the class as an ongoing conversation of learning with all the participants.

      It sets up the teacher not simply as the unquestionable "sage-on-the-stage" but as a guide through the material.

      If we didn't question our teachers, their ideas, their writings, and learn new things, we could have stopped at Aristotle and everyone would still think the Earth was the center of the universe and that feathers fall as fast as bowling balls.

    2. Annotate Your Syllabus 3.0

      Potential sub-title: "The syllabus is a living conversation"

  2. Nov 2020
    1. listening to students

      Watch this related video (1 min 30 sec) to hear directly from students themselves on their experience, goals, and needs. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B6ICmyUEYJI&t=2s

    2. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

      This report, "Student Speak 2020", prepared by GlobalMindED in partnership with Every Learner Everywhere and The Equity Project, is the focus of an AnnotatED social annotation workshop during OLC Accelerate 2020. Read more about the workshop and join us in reading and discussing this report using annotation.

      OLC Accelerate 2020 speaker Flower Darby selected this report to foster discussion around the themes of her keynote and closing plenary.

  3. Oct 2020
    1. In April of 2019, at a digital learning conference, Manuel Espinoza spoke with educators, technologists, and annotation enthusiasts about R2L.d-undefined, .lh-undefined { background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2) !important; }.d-undefined, .lh-undefined { background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5) !important; }1Nate Angell and “the role that Hypothesis plays in human rights work.”

      Manuel Espinoza, “Keynote,” AnnotatED Summit, April 2, 2018, https://youtu.be/5LNmSjDHipM.

  4. Jul 2020
    1. Stalking Cat is open to the idea of a relationship, especially with a cat girl by far, which may exist but they haven't met them. It requires a very deep bond, and it's difficult to deny that bond to a given animal, so I imagine it might be difficult to sustain a non cat-cat relationship.

      There's also the issue of not having enough time to sustain a relationship, as much time is spent pursuing body modifications.

    2. Going back a few generations, apparently what Stalking Cat is doing was a "fairly common thing" in the Huron (may've misspelled that) tribe, according to a professor of Native American Studies.

    3. There is some surprise from the general public about how intelligent and articulate members of the animal-style body mod community (and furry fandom) are, concerning their weirdness and animalistic tendencies. Stalking Cat has a degree in electronics engineering.

      In addition, Stalking Cat's work is specialised enough that they have a solid position in their employment field, and isn't worried in that regard. Adding onto that, Stalking Cat is quite introverted, and in their day-to-day life, and Cat really doesn't give a shit, despite their empathy. It was something they had to do, and Cat knows you may feel some way about that, but it's irrelevant. (Without being so brash in words.)

    4. Stalking Cat has experienced behavioral changes in the vein of no longer drinkin' and druggin', heightened empathy, and reacting to certain things in different ways. By no longer denying these feelings, it's been easier to deal with different situations.

      Reacts to things in a more "natural cat" way than anything else. Very cat-like in actions. (Lynx -> Tiger for e-mail address.)-> general feline affinity, but focus on tiger because it's the largest non-extinct cat on this continent.

      Feline affinity is more great with big cats than smaller, domestic cats. (Primal nature? Bow hunting (Indian tradition) deer. Mutual respect with cats, 10' near bobcat, 25' near mountain lion, leaves when known hunting territory for another animal.) If you're not bow-hunting, and using a gun, you don't deserve that kill, basically. Gun hunting separates people from the experience of hunting. Stalking Cat is very much a cat in hunting & associated mannerisms.

    5. If the resources are available, Stalking Cat plans (planned?) to extend their body modification not just to the face, but tails, claws, feet (paws) everything, but it's an expensive and time-consuming process.

    6. As Shannon Larratt is interviewing Stalking Cat, he brings up a point that's quite interesting to me, and entirely relevant to the idea of privacy and unwanted celebrity we discussed earlier in this course.

      SL: "... uh you do- you do go to a fair number of tattoo conventions, and you must experience at least a minor celebrity status while you're there."

      SC: "Well, you know, in fact, I've only been to a couple conventions-"

      SL: "I guess- I guess it's just every one you go to, they will always photo you."

      SC: "Right, and my pictures have been plastered all over the place, and uh, it, in a way kind of irritates me, because these people're making money off of something I've spent a great deal of time doing, and I haven't gotten a dime out of it."

      SL: "Mmhmm."

      SC: "But uh, and uh, and they're basically using my picture to get themselves famous."

      SL: "Mmhmm."

      SC: "Or to get publicised."

      SL: "Yeah."

      SC: "But again, I did this for me, not for other people."

      SL: "Mmhmm."

      There's also been a positive side to this, as it encouraged self-expression amongst the public, and while not exactly normalising it, it allowed people who needed to do stuff like this to accept it and go for it. (But not those who are doing it as a trend.)

    7. Interesting story behind feline dentures, how the dentist refused to do them when they were healthy, but when Stalking Cat destroyed their teeth from years of drinkin' and druggin' (their words, not mine), the dentist agreed to sculpt feline teeth-style dentures.

      I'm surprised it doesn't affect Cat's speech (much).

    8. Stalking Cat spent a lot of time self-medicating with drugs and alcohol trying to deny their empathy and their connection to different animals, especially cats. Trying to subdue and deny these feelings didn't work very well, but living as a cat counteracted these negative feelings.

    9. Stalking Cat has had/coexisted with a variety of animals, including reptiles, wolves, snakes, birds, fish, and horses. Despite Stalking Cat's feline identity, they don't clash with dogs or wolves in a stereotypical fashion.

      Maintains a general connection to animals, tied to both their experiences as an Indian, and tied to their identity as an animal themselves.

    10. Being 1/2 Indian (Native American) & 1/2 White was a very big culture shock to Stalking Cat, as they fought with both the Indians & the Whites for being partially the other race. Stalking Cat accepted the cat/tigress as their spirit animal, which was originally pointed out by the medicine man of Cat's tribe.

      Has many tattoos, started with aquatic animals and moved onto cat-type tattoos.

    1. The dominion of man over animal that this naming manifests thus comes before original sin and the Fall,6

      There's the argument about whether man's dominion over animals signifies man's power over animals to do as he pleases, or whether it means a responsibility to protect & nurture these animals. This is explored within the context of vegetarianism/veganism as a moral quandary for Christians.

    2. Balancing out difficulties with human communication, Grandin has recently popular- ized the notion that ASDs can produce a special understanding of animal consciousness and contribute to enhanced interspecies communication.

      Those with Autism Spectrum Disorders can logically break down human interaction, but are woefully unable to replicate it in the moment. This can also be applied to interspecies interactions.

    3. The disappearance of other species with whom the lives of humans were formerly intertwined increasingly impoverishes our worlds. We lack what Lingis would consider essential emotional teachers. We know our pets. We know zoos; nature films; anthropomorphic fiction, film, and art; toys; cartoons

      With such a lack of animals in our lives, we use our imagination as children when it comes to animals we do not know. Kids love dinosaurs and big cats. I've only seen a snow leopard once, at a zoo, but they are beautiful creatures, and that's why I have a connection to them. Humans take up the world's prime real estate, killing off thousands of species and shoving the world's animals to the sidelines. It's quite depressing, really, the homogenization of the world.

    4. Only three interview subjects talked to me about their own erotic investment in the fandom, but I suspect that many others were more interested in having fun at FWA than in talk- ing to me about their sex lives. Although my official escort soon left me to proceed on my own, a few people approached me between interviews to make sure I was not up to anything objectionable. The most interesting of these was a graduate student in performance studies whom I met only in full fursuit and who checked my credentials with his major professor, an old friend of mine. I hope that this young scholar and amazing fur-suit dancer - he won the contest - will write about the fandom

      There's a pervading distrust of reporters/outsiders at furry conventions. For a group that had their convention gassed (Midwest FurFest 2014), and regularly puts up with death threats of the internet and in real life, I wouldn't consider their scaredy-cat (forgive the pun) behavior all that surprising

    5. This encounter then came to mind during a smaller conference the following spring when Tony Kubiak spoke of the recent creation of a chimeric human-cat protein intended to block allergic reactions (in humans).6

      Genetic manipulation has been a running gag/ideal within the furry community for as long as it has existed. The idea of transformation by any means possible is appealing, and these sorts of genetic components would go a long way in establishing that sense of identity.

    6. Because expenses and dynamics became unworkable for this interesting household, Cat was asked to move out later that summer. A

      That's a damn shame, to be honest. Stalking Cat was happy in that co-dependent commune, but as for the money issue, it is what it is.

      Probably contributed to Stalking Cat's later decline & suicide.

    7. e surger- ies took longer to arrange. Steve Haworth of Phoenix, who describes himself as a "body modification and human evolution artist," did most of them: pointing his ears, reshaping his cheeks and forehead with silicone implants, moving his nasal septum, cleaving his upper lip, replacing his teeth with feline dentures.1 T

      While this could be argued, I believe that this is a disturbing breach of the Hippocratic Oath on the part of Steve Haworth. This amount of surgery is not reasonable, and ended up severely hurting Stalking Cat's prospects for jobs and in other areas of their life. I am reminded of other people who have horribly proportioned bodies because of the insane amount of silicone pumped into their bodies, and the medical complications that result.

      Is there a point where we have to say no to body modifications, no matter how much people such as Stalking Cat may want them? Or do we leave that choice up to them?

    8. 192 / Maria Carlson Figure 1. Stalking Cat. he perceives as spiritual to all feline species but particularly to tigers, and he says that his modification simply uses technology to accomplish a sort of transformation long- practiced among his Huron and Lakota ancestors

      This is an interesting account as to the lengths that some members of the furry fandom will go to achieve their image. I give some note to the idea of species identity disorder, as a marked divide between Stalking Cat's vision of themselves and their human body is present. This is quite obviously an outlier, but it's an intriguing illustration. Not to mention that Stalking Cat ties this back to Huron & Lakota ancestor traditions, which is shaky ground at best.

    1. It took only a couple decades for the internet to transform from a weird underground hobby to an entirely new medium for the self. One of the earliest draws of internet society was the invitation to become someone else — to obscure the dull strains of your real life behind a veil of mysterious text or behind an avatar, the image or persona you create to represent you online. In those days, it often seemed like people had collectively assented to participate in some degree of fiction about one another. The person on your forum or in your channel who loved to say inflammatory things was just some troll; you could even assume that he wasn’t like that in real life. That these were only mechanisms specific to the character he lived as online.

      May be useful as comparison.

  5. Jun 2020
    1. The furries are kind of like the new age Native American where they have the spirit animal or connection, or like, they take on that personal animal. . . . And whatever you put on, [you] take on those characters [and] aspects, and, for some people with social stigma who can’t interact, they put on the suit and they’re a completely different person.

      Make note of Sarah Marie Henry's Furries, Fans, and Feminism: Querying and Queering of the Furry Fandom. Sarah Marie Henry made a very good point about the appropriation of Native American culture in the furry fandom, something that is not exactly the nicest thing to do. Traditions stay within certain groups for a reason. A direct quotation/reference may be impossible, as the only copy of this master's thesis is locked up in San Francisco State University, and there's a pandemic. 😕

    2. Furries are in the perilous position of having their interests form an integral part of their identity while simultaneously experiencing stigmatization from the world around them. For many, the fandom is their only source of social interaction and social support.

      For an activity, and a fandom, that is such a large part of the practitioner's identity (see Gerbasi et. al 2008 and associated responses), it's no surprise that the stigmatization that comes with being a furry is an isolating experience. I believe that this is a large a part of the reason why acceptance is such a large tenant of the furry fandom. Exclusion elsewhere leads to increased inclusion in other areas and groups.

      Non-judgementality should be the ultimate goal for health care workers in this position, but we have to recognize that it is a difficult, if not unrideable horse to handle.

    3. A small subset of furries, called “therians,” go beyond the interest in developing a fursona and believe they are spiritually connected to animals, are less than 100 per-cent human, are an animal trapped in a human body, or were an animal in a former life (Gerbasi et al., 2008).

      There's also the dissenting opinion that therians are a separate group from furries, an opinion perpetuated both by therians and "normal" furries, but it's generally the minority opinion, so for all intents and purposes, this is accurate.

    1. She states that furry participants might identify as less than 100% human for reasons that she felt included, “not the least having a hangover from furry drinks the night before.” While it may be an attempt at humor, we find this comment to be egregiously offensive, derogatory, and insulting to the furry fandom and our participants. Ironically, this remark illustrates her subscription to the very stereotypes we were empirically testing and con-firms the necessity of our research.

      This comment, framed as "egregiously offensive, derogatory, and insulting to the furry fandom and our participants", undermines the prevailing sense of identity in the furry fandom. I understand the transformative powers of alcohol, but in my uneducated opinion, it's a stretch that the furry identity for many people is activated by alcohol, and is not something that exists in all states of being (e.g.: sobriety).

    2. Popular media provided the only available information (Stahl & Lewis, 2003; Gurley, 2001), which suggested that furries had interests in zoomorphism and anthropomor-phism. These media portrayals were resoundingly unfavorable toward furries and empirically unfounded.

      A good example of this was the CSI: Miami episode "Fur and Loathing".

      According to the Reception section of the article on this episode on Wikipedia: "Toronto-based filmmaker Michael McNamara, who had been working on his own documentary episode on furry fandom, said that the CSI episode "portrayed the community as a community of sexual deviants who like to have sex in fur costumes" and expressed concern that "it winds up giving the whole fandom a bad name, which made them nervous and camera-shy, so it was tricky to get their trust".[2] He wrote that the deviancy "probably represents about two percent of fandom but it’s the one obviously that the press always gleefully jumps."[3] Greg Gaudio of The Virginian-Pilot wrote that "The steamier side of the Furry Fandom – sexual behavior involving animal costumes and stuffed animals – has grabbed media attention in recent years, most notably as the subject of a 2003 episode of CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. The episode showed attendees at a furry convention engaging in a costume-clad orgy"; however, one of the furry fandom attendees he interviewed replied that such behavior "only involves a tiny percentage of furries and is not something that’s part of the local scene."[4] Negative perception towards members of the furry fandom for purported sexual deviancy has been a historical shame(?) (<-- figure out correct word in annotated bibliography) amongst members of the furry community, and acts as a harmful stereotype despite the small percentage of furry fandom members participating in acts of plushophilia or autozoophilia.

    3. Her focus on gender identity disorder misses the main point of the study, which was that it was the first empirical study to collect data scientifically and report find-ings on the furry fandom, an often misrepresented subculture.

      One must admit that Flora Probyn-Rapsey's comparisons of gender identity disorder and the proposed "species identity disorder" were not without their merits, no? Heck, Gerbasi et. al were the ones to first make the comparison. It is true that it maybe took up too much of a focus in Probyn-Rapsey's criticism of the original paper. After all, the original paper only made use of the comparisons between the two disorders a few times to illustrate a larger point about disorder & confusion about furry identity, in themselves and in their place in the world at large.

    4. Why so FURious? Rebuttal of Dr. Fiona Probyn-Rapsey’s Response to Gerbasi et al.’s “Furries from A to Z (Anthropomorphism to Zoomorphism)”

      Ha.

      This is a rebuttal of a response to Gerbasi et al.'s paper summarizing and examination of the furry fandom. I'm curious to see how this paper will critically analyze the others. Given that it's chiefly written by Kathleen C. Gerbasi and Laura L. Scaletta, who chiefly wrote "Furries from A to Z (Anthropomorphism to Zoomorphism", I have no doubt that the insights throughout will be charged. Or maybe they won't. Professionalism is chief in academia, after all.

    1. I wonder how I can tie this into the furry fandom as a whole. It's pretty clear from this graph that members of the furry fandom, even in Texas, seem to lean towards more liberal political beliefs. Considering the large LGBTQIA+ & animal rights activist populations, groups that tend to skew more liberal themselves, within the furry fandom, this isn't entirely surprising.

    1. Here the diagnosis slips from requiring both being “less than 100% human” and “being 0% human” to only requiring the first criterion—being “less than 100% human.” The implications of this rhetorical slip are a vast shift in proportion, since it triples the number of furries who are potentially diagnosable as having species identity disorder (from 31 to 99 [or 46%] of the 214 furries who answered).

      I would argue that this is too loose of a definition. It does not simply refer to a physical body, which has pretty clear criteria for being considered 100% human. To be "less than 100% human" psychologically, while being a good basis for a disorder, does not adequately consider groups with a spiritual connection to animals, such as the Native American tradition of "spirit animals". This vague definition and exclusion of established cultural practices could prove harmful to the legitimacy of "species identity disorder".

    2. The data on personality disorders showed that furries were less likely to judge other furries as disordered, while the control group (the psychology students) judged other college students “significantly more often” along the lines of personality trait disorders. That the control group was made up of psychology students is perhaps an important factor here; this group may display an increased sensi-tivity to normative behaviors and “disorder.”

      When you ask a group of intermediate psychology students to judge whether furries are disordered, it's very likely that they will diagnose furries with personality trait disorder. They are psychology students, it seems pretty darn obvious that they would be more likely to diagnose psychological disorders, and there's the prevailing possibility of overdiagnosing, diagnosing a personality trait disorder where there may not be one. I am not in a position to say this is what is happening here, but considering the evidence, it's a reasonable possibility.

    3. Species identity disorder is modeled on gender identity disorder, itself a highly controversial diagnosis that has been criticized for pathol-ogizing homosexuality and transgendered people.

      This was also a major problem with the diagnosis "gender identity disorder", which was defined in the DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) IV as "A strong and persistent cross-gender identification (not merely a desire for any perceived cultural advantages of being the other sex)."

      In the DSM V, the diagnostic name "gender identity disorder" was replaced with "gender dysphoria", and other important clarifications, including the need for a formal diagnosis of gender dysphoria to go ahead with gender transition surgery.

    1. That signified a total restructuring of my life, even to the point where the old character I had inhabited, a red fox with two tails, the tips of which were dyed green, no longer applied. It was high-school-me. It was me-growing-up. It is not me now.

      Amongst younger members of the furry fandom, there is more of a tendency to have a "sparkledog" fursona, meaning a fursona that's flashy, clashy, colorful, and out-standing. While not as crazy as, say, some of the rainbow-coloured winged kitsune out there, a fox with neon-green tail tips is definitely not something you would see in a real life animal.

      That being said, being a member of the furry fandom, no matter your age, is a matter of self-expression, and the value of debating the realism of a rainbow kitsune with wings falls apart when you realise that they wouldn't even walk on two legs.

    2. the face-first pouncing of foxes

      Visual aid for anyone unfamiliar with this proclivity of foxes, who use this method of hunting to find mice and other burrowing small animals in the wintertime

    3. Discussion along these lines continued after the panel itself, as a few of the attendees convinced me to head out to dinner rather than straight up to bed (thanks for that, it was the first real meal of the day)

      I know that this is supposed to be funny commentary on the chaos on conventions, and I understand, having experienced some of that same craziness during my time at FanimeCon.

      But it's as good of an illustration as any on a negative perception of the furry fandom, the inability of its members to take care of themselves. While this isn't as much a widespread ideal as a minor detail, there's a stereotype around furries as being unwashed, non deodorised, and messy. Take, for example, the idea that people have sex in their fursuits. See this comic involving Grey White, which contain a slight, non-graphic sexual allusion, so click at your own discretion. I'd rather not go into the details, as this research project does not deal with the sexual side of the furry fandom, but I feel as if it is necessary to at least address that specific prevailing concern about the fandom. There is some truth to the above statements, amongst specific members of the furry fandom, and of the science fiction conventions and community which preceded and spawned the "furry fandom" as we know it today. I don't think I need to tell anyone that nerds can smell like shit at times, and it's a concerning pattern. Does this stem from social awkwardness, lack of care, the escapism qualities.

      (I need to come back to this later, as I kind of lost my train of thought)

    4. I began by asking the room full of furries why they chose the animal they did for their species, and I received a lot of answers that fit in well with my experience of the fandom. Notable among the explanations were the oft-used words 'identity', 'connection', 'personality', and 'characteristics'. And this, of course makes sense. Many introductions to furry, whether they're websites (the first introductory website I found was Captain Packrat's explanation of FurCodes) or friends, explain that although furry is about being a fan of anthropomorphism in general, it often (but not always) specifically involves a personal connection with an animal that leads to the creation of a personal character: an avatar often used in interaction with other furries.

      While furries are fans of anthropomorphism in general, they connect more with certain animals. There are subcamps of furries, including scalies (with an interest in reptilian animals such as dragons, turtles, and lizards (e.g.: kobolds)) and avians (interest in birds, mainly), and some of the more popular animals in the furry fandom include foxes, wolves, and big cats. This is, in part, due to popular media representation, with movies such as The Fox and the Hound, Balto, Bolt, Alpha and Omega, and Aristocats. Ever since the "funny animal" cartoons of the early 1900s, there has been a persistent animal superiority in anthropomorphic representations.

    1. For some reason, I can't highlight the 1st comment.

      Trapping one's self into a box is harmful, and leads to the need to feed off of that identity to feel actualized. While I don't believe that setting a firm identity to yourself ultimately or always leads to self destruction, I see where z is coming from. On the contrary, a firm identity can allow people to feel as if they aren't drifting in space, and can give something they can hold onto. Especially in the case of a fursona, a personality (purrsonality?) and figure that is inherently extrinsic, but connected to one's base self, the human. This same logic could be applied to therians and otherkins, possibly even more so, due to the intense non-human identity associated with the terms, as opposed to members of the furry fandom, which may be participating in a more casual, removed fashion.

    2. I took this as an almost alchemical act. After all, alchemy is more than just transmuting literal lead into literal gold. It's the transmutation of a base substance into something better. Through calcination and dissolution, the base - the *prima materia*, the self, the fox - is broken down. Through separation, conjunction, and fermentation, something new is compiled from what was in rough shapes. Through distillation and coagulation, the new self - the cat - is solidified, completed, made whole. As with a lot of how I experience furry, this is a microcosm, rather than something unique. I am not the only one to be deliberate about changing my species, just as I'm not the only one to read way too much into the furry fandom. Furry, as a whole, is an exercise in self-actualization. It is taking the idea of "this is how I want to be seen" to places and extents not often tread. Through each aspect of ourselves, we choose how we want to interact. We choose a species, we choose a name, we choose what aspects of our personalities to show to each other and the world. We construct and create every day of our lives, and we're made all the better for it. Shameless boosterism aside, we're good at what we do and what we make, whether that's art or fun or just ourselves. The more we create, the better we get at it, too. All that's left to do is to keep on creating, to keep putting our intent and our will to work. Just as I can dig into the intent behind changing a name, a fursona, an identity, I can look for the magic of self-actualization within furry as a whole. After all, furry is magic.

      This ties back into an earlier passage in this article. Furry-ism(?) is an exercise in self-actualization. Break 'em down and build 'em up. Throughout our lives, we are encouraged to change ourselves for the better, and this is a parallel to that.

      Shared experience? Prime material and its relation?

    3. As I mentioned back in...oh jeez, 2013 was really five years ago!? As I mentioned half a decade back, a change in species or character often happens around large life changes, and I'm no different. The process of death and rebirth that goes along with this surgery, where I die - hopefully metaphorically - on the table and am reborn, changed, is no small feat. So it was that, shortly after my surgery consult back in 2016, I got the idea to start interacting with friends as something other than an arctic fox. More and more, I started appearing as a snow leopard (because I couldn't seem to let go of those wintry species). At first, it was an 'alt' situation: Maddy, as the snow leopard was called, was an alternate character to use when I wasn't feeling the fox. Art by Grey White She was different from the 'usual' in a few ways. She's cis, for one, unlike the arctic fox, who transitioned along with me. She's shorter and a bit pudgier than I am. She's happier and struggles less with mental health. She's an ideal rather than a reality, and something to be played for fun. Or, well, she was. This 'alt' phase lasted a few months, I suppose, before I woke up one morning and realized I'd not interacted as an arctic fox in a few days. Slowly but surely, the snow leopard had started to overtake the fox.

      The fursona can be an idealization of one's desires in one's self, or it an be a true-to-life representation. If it is changed, it usually changes along with something in your own life. A fursona being a representation of you means that changes are not taken easily. Then again, I also know of furries with many fursonas.

      The truth is, furries often like to hide behind these idealised representations of themselves. For a fandom that's so heavily represented by the introverted, the outcasts, the autistic ((Gerbasi et. al(?)) I need to make sure that's the right paper), it only makes sense that furries would want this sense of escapism. There's also a sense of childlike wonderment at play. Take for example, this article's title, Furry and Magic. The furry fandom, and the action of associating with one's fursona (also, avoid usage of the term "spirit animal", as it appropriates Native American Culture. See Sarah Marie Henry's Furries, Fans, and Feminism: Querying and Queering the Furry Fandom) is a transcendent experience..

      Side note: The short, pudgy female cis snow leopard is scarily close to my own fursona, maybe I should tie personal special experience into this? Or that may be oversharing/stepping out of the line of professionalism. I'll think about that later.

    4. Magic, as they say, is nothing more than an act of intent. It is "the science and art of causing change to occur in conformity with will," if one is to believe Crowley (not necessarily recommended). In this sense, if spells are acts of intent, then coming up with spells is the act of defining one's intentions. In this sense, magic is living deliberately.

      Huh. Nice nod to Aleister Crowley.

  6. knowyourbees-blog-blog.tumblr.com knowyourbees-blog-blog.tumblr.com
    1. HornetsHornets are biologically not bees in nature, but in the Queen Bees’ Beehive, they slightly qualify as a bee. Although hornets have the ability to be bees, they are a bit dysfunctional and a pest to the Beehive. These insects always want something from the Queen Bee. They are “horny” for her do something new and different. All bees experience this feeling once and a while, but they move on from their desires. Hornets however, will not stop buzzing about what they want. They complain too much. These are the type of bees that are easy to be stung within the Beehive. Once they are stung, they will try to sting back, but their stinger is weak because it is not nourished with appreciation of all that the Queen Bee does.

      Does this refer to horniness as in the sexual context or just really excited and pushy for Beyoncé to do something new and cool?

    2. The Yellow JacketsYellow jackets are NOT real bees at all. In fact, these insects are seasonal. Whenever the Queen Bee releases new honey, the yellow jackets will quickly throw their “bee jacket” on and sneak into the Beehive to enjoy her honey for the festive season. However, when the season is over, these insects will throw away the jacket for the Queen Bee and slip on another jacket, buzzing for the next current hottest critter. These insects sting whenever they are put on the spot about their jumpy behavior. Although they sting, it isn’t painful. No sting is painful if it’s not from a true bee.

      This opens up some interesting commentary about the transient nature of some fans, hopping around from fandom to fandom, interest to interest, standom to standom. It's more common than some would like to think, and it's shown in communities such as "transtrenders" (often used as a derogatory term towards the transgender population in general, but a particularly harmful community in itself).

      Outsiders(?) Insiders-Outsiders(?)

    1. “bookish girls tend to mark phases of their lives by periods of intense literary character identification”

      I find parallels to my own experiences associating with and relating to characters in books, such as Kory in Waterways by Kyell Gold.

      Note to self: research "kinnies"

    1. Literacies Teachers Need During Covid-19

      As a part of the AnnotatED Workshop before OLC Innovate 2020, a group of people will annotate this article by Maha Bali, along with the author herself.

      Learn more about Maha on her blog or follow @bali_maha on Twitter.

      Read along with us and add your own annotations using a free Hypothesis account you can also create using the link at the top of this sidebar.

      You can also explore all the annotations on this article a different way using visualizations and analytics at CROWDLAAERS from Remi Kalir and Francisco Perez.

    1. Wow. This is a side of the fandom I wouldn't want to touch with a 20 foot pole. However, it provides interesting information about the darker sides of the furry fandom, so it would be good to pore over.

      I am reminded of "Arkansas":

    1. This is an interesting article. Who has enough money to actually make a fursuit out of real fur? Still, it's a good example of the general public's perception of the subculture.

      I believe that the furry fandom has a large proportion of animal rights activists, vegans, etc., but I need to find research to back this up. I hope that FurCon and other associated conventions ban real fur, though.

    1. I am going to choose the subculture of the furry fandom to base my LS-121 annotated bibliography project on, as I already have some experience with it, and it is a broader topic than some of the other subcultures that I was considering, such as the SCP Foundation fans.

  7. May 2020
    1. INTRODUCTION

      As a part of the AnnotatED Workshop before OLC Innovate 2020, a group of people will annotate this introduction to Martin Weller's book, 25 Years of Ed Tech, along with the author himself.

      Learn more about Martin on his blog or follow @mweller on Twitter.

      Read along with us and add your own annotations using a free Hypothesis account you can also create using the link at the top of this sidebar.

  8. Apr 2019
    1. Professional digital practice: using digital media tools for professional purposes: to build networks, construct an e-profile, publicise and share research and instruct students. Sociological analyses of digital use: researching the ways in which people's use of digital media configures their sense of selves, their embodiment and their social relations. Digital data analysis: using digital data for social research, either quantitative or qualitative. Critical digital sociology: undertaking reflexive and critical analysis of digital media informed by social and cultural theory.

      Tressie McMillan Cottom quotes this in her post "Why Is Digital Sociology?"

    1. Professional digital practice: using digital tools as part of professional practice – build networks, construct e-portfolios, build online profiles, publicize and share research Analysis of digital technology use: research the ways in which people’s use of digital technologies configures their sense of self and their embodiment of social relations, the role of digital media in the creation or reproduction of social institutions and structures Digital Data Analysis: using naturally occurring digital data for social research Critical Digital Sociology: reflexive analysis of digital technologies informed by social and cultural theory

      This quote comes from a Wikipedia page on digital sociology.

    2. Digital Sociology in the broadest sense addresses the question of what such reinvention could or should mean in new circumstances where the content of this ‘newness’ is defined largely by the digital.

      You can jump directly to this quote in Mark Carigan's post "What Is Sociology?"

    1. Digital Sociology in the broadest sense addresses the question of what such reinvention could or should mean in new circumstances where the content of this ‘newness’ is defined largely by the digital.

      Tressie McMillan Cottom quotes this in her post "Why Is Digital Sociology?"

  9. Mar 2019
    1. We refer to this idea as the access hypothesis.

      In thinking about the questions I’m raising in my presentation at OLC Innovate 2019, let's start by asking the question whether we think the "access hypothesis" is a significant component in measuring the impact of OER on student learning?

  10. Jan 2019
  11. Oct 2017
    1. And outside the classroom, meetings with public oicials, nonprofits, and other community members, where students are given a chance to present their findings and recommendations on an issue they’ve researched

      Public annotation of government documents/websites, newspaper articles, etc.

  12. Mar 2017
  13. Apr 2016
    1. Jeremy DeanPosted on January 27, 2016January 28, 2016Categories Getting Started

      As a side-note (pun intended?), to help beautify your web presence a bit, you might notice that your photo doesn't show up in the author position in your 2016 theme on single posts. To fix this, you can (create and) use your WordPress.com username/password to create an account on their sister site Gravatar.com. Uploading your preferred photo on Gravatar and linking it to an email will help to automatically populate your photo in both your site and other wordpress sites across the web. To make it work on your site, just go to your user profile in your wordpress install and use the same email address in your user profile as your gravatar account and the system will port your picture across automatically. If necessary, you can use multiple photos and multiple linked email addresses in your gravatar account to vary your photos.

  14. Mar 2016
  15. Feb 2014
    1. Legal Writing for the Courts: An Annotated Bibliography
      • Mechanics
      • Argument
      • Style
      • Writing and Editing Process
      • Legal Briefs
      • Samples