74 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. The next step is to link the canonical article to the AMP page. This is achieved by including a <link rel="amphtml"> tag to the <head> section of the canonical article.
  2. Jul 2020
    1. Every AMP document needs to have a link referencing the "canonical" version of that document. We'll learn more about what canonical pages are and different approaches to canonical linking in the Making your page discoverable step of this tutorial.
    1. Canonical linking in regular HTML pages is a common technique for declaring which page should be considered the preferred page when multiple pages include the same content.
  3. May 2020
    1. Not building a static site? No worries there, React Static works as an SPA too, even if there is only a single index.html file.
    1. You might try this extension: https://github.com/andreicristianpetcu/google_translate_this It does the same thing in the same way as Page Translator and likely will be blocked by Mozilla, but this is a cat and mouse game worth playing if you rely on full-page in-line language translation.
    1. Team Chat on any Webpage to Discuss Issues, Feedback: Inverse

      Am instalat extensia și mi-am făcut conturi cu dinu.laurentiu@gmail.com si laurentiu.test01@gmail.com. NU consider că extensia/aplicația este de păstrat... nu arată rău, dar nu aduce NIMIC ÎN PLUS FAȚĂ DE HYPOTHES.IS

    1. Invite other people to your organization Inverse is designed for everyone, but built with groups and teams in mind. Use your organization code in Settings to invite people to your organization.

      Se pot crea echipe (Organizații) care să comenteze împreună pe o anumită pagină web

  4. Mar 2020
    1. Single Page Applications: The Rise of Web Apps in 2020

      If you want an excellent user engagement between your application and them, single page web apps is the best choice. To offer the best real-time experience to the users, web apps like Google-Maps use single page application.

    1. How Single Page Application Can Benefit Your Business?

      The definition of single-page web apps lies exactly in their words. It has only one page, which means the whole page gets load only for one time. Later when users request any data only that data will be updated not the whole page.

  5. Feb 2020
  6. Dec 2019
    1. Easiest Approach To Garner Attention Of Prospective Customers

      The biggest struggle is to attract customers and make them stay on your platform. You need to find out ways through which you can keep your website the most happening one. Almost every business owner is in a sort of competition to look for ways through which he or she can make his or her brand progress at a faster pace.

      In the digital world, a business cannot make a progress without practicing marketing techniques. There is a need to use strategies that can boost the overall effectiveness and increase the productivity of a brand. Every brand tends to attract customers through ways that can enhance the productivity of the entire business. From using content marketing to making the most of pay-per-click, the strategies do not end and you have to dig out ways through which you can make the most out of each campaign.

      Even the Wikipedia page editor knows that the core technique to bring more traffic to your platform is to carry out a competitive analysis of the market and find out what the customers/readers truly want. You have to dive into the market and get close to your audience. You have to know what they have to say about your product and find out the effective ways to promote your services in order to bring out maximum outcomes.

      Apart from knowing the audience, you have to find out which branding style is most suitable for your business. You need to use the one that has the most potentials. So, try utilizing content marketing and search engine optimization techniques if you want to keep your investment minimal and outcomes maximum.

      You will need a list of advanced tools and detectors to assist your campaign and evaluate if everything si going smoothly or not.

  7. Nov 2019
  8. Oct 2019
    1. Facebook, with over 2.23 Billion monthly active users, is an ocean full of just the right customers for your business. For all brands and creators looking to expand their business and be visible in the densely crowded market, Facebook is a blessing. Targeting specific customers, customizing audience, creating look alike audience and tapping into fresher markets is easier with Facebook business. Knowing how to create a Facebook business page brings along a lot of unexplored opportunities for brands aspiring to become top stars on digital media.

      Knowing how to create a Facebook business page brings along a lot of unexplored opportunities for brands aspiring to become top stars on digital media.

  9. Sep 2019
  10. Aug 2019
  11. Apr 2019
    1. The majority of the annotations on this page draw from the following critical editions of The War of the Worlds, which will be cited and tagged according to the last name(s) of the editor(s) of that edition:

      DANAHAY: Martin A. Danahay. The War of the Worlds. Broadview Press, 2003.

      HUGHES AND GEDULD: David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld, eds. A Critical Edition of The War of the Worlds: H. G. Wells’s Scientific Romance, with Introduction and Notes by David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld. Indiana UP, 1993.

      MCCONNELL: Frank McConnell, ed. The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds: A Critical Edition. Oxford UP, 1977.

      STOVER: Leon Stover. The War of the Worlds: A Critical Text of the 1898 London First Edition, with an Introduction, Illustrations and Appendices. McFarland and Company, Inc, 2001.

      Madeline Gangnes has added additional annotations and resources, especially those that address materials related to Pearson's Magazine and adaptations of the text. They are cited with their source(s) (where applicable) and tagged as GANGNES.

    2. This page incorporates several elements. Its main body is a transcription of the text of the third installment of H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds as it was published in Pearson's Magazine in June of 1897. This text was created by Madeline Gangnes by comparing the Project Gutenberg text with the digital facsimiles of Pearson's Magazine generously hosted by HathiTrust. Facsimile pages of the installment are interspersed throughout this page. Each image includes a detailed caption in order to facilitate text-to-speech accessibility. Textual markers that indicate the beginning and end of each page's text are incorporated for text-to-speech and to make clear which text corresponds to which page of the magazine.

    1. The majority of the annotations on this page draw from the following critical editions of The War of the Worlds, which will be cited and tagged according to the last name(s) of the editor(s) of that edition:

      DANAHAY: Martin A. Danahay. The War of the Worlds. Broadview Press, 2003.

      HUGHES AND GEDULD: David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld, eds. A Critical Edition of The War of the Worlds: H. G. Wells’s Scientific Romance, with Introduction and Notes by David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld. Indiana UP, 1993.

      MCCONNELL: Frank McConnell, ed. The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds: A Critical Edition. Oxford UP, 1977.

      STOVER: Leon Stover. The War of the Worlds: A Critical Text of the 1898 London First Edition, with an Introduction, Illustrations and Appendices. McFarland and Company, Inc, 2001.

      Madeline Gangnes has added additional annotations and resources, especially those that address materials related to Pearson's Magazine and adaptations of the text. They are cited with their source(s) (where applicable) and tagged as GANGNES.

    2. This page incorporates several elements. Its main body is a transcription of the text of the second installment of H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds as it was published in Pearson's Magazine in May of 1897. This text was created by Madeline Gangnes by comparing the Project Gutenberg text with the digital facsimiles of Pearson's Magazine generously hosted by HathiTrust. Facsimile pages of the installment are interspersed throughout this page. Each image includes a detailed caption in order to facilitate text-to-speech accessibility. Textual markers that indicate the beginning and end of each page's text are incorporated for text-to-speech and to make clear which text corresponds to which page of the magazine.

    1. The majority of the annotations on this page draw from the following critical editions of The War of the Worlds, which will be cited and tagged according to the last name(s) of the editor(s) of that edition:

      DANAHAY: Martin A. Danahay. The War of the Worlds. Broadview Press, 2003.

      HUGHES AND GEDULD: David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld, eds. A Critical Edition of The War of the Worlds: H. G. Wells’s Scientific Romance, with Introduction and Notes by David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld. Indiana UP, 1993.

      MCCONNELL: Frank McConnell, ed. The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds: A Critical Edition. Oxford UP, 1977.

      STOVER: Leon Stover. The War of the Worlds: A Critical Text of the 1898 London First Edition, with an Introduction, Illustrations and Appendices. McFarland and Company, Inc, 2001.

      Madeline Gangnes has added additional annotations and resources, especially those that address materials related to Pearson's Magazine and adaptations of the text. They are cited with their source(s) (where applicable) and tagged as GANGNES.

    2. This page incorporates several elements. Its main body is a transcription of the text of the first installment of H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds as it was published in Pearson's Magazine in April of 1897. This text was created by Madeline Gangnes by comparing the Project Gutenberg text with the digital facsimiles of Pearson's Magazine generously hosted by HathiTrust. Facsimile pages of the installment are interspersed throughout this page. Each image includes a detailed caption in order to facilitate text-to-speech accessibility. Textual markers that indicate the beginning and end of each page's text are incorporated for text-to-speech and to make clear which text corresponds to which page of the magazine.

    1. The music we listen to highly impacts our decision making, especially as adolescents. Adolescents are extremely impressionable, and the music they listen to has a great impact on how they decide to live their day to day lives. Popular musicians are seen as role models by the people who idolize them, and adolescents may try to represents the songs in which they favor through their actions every day.

      Recent studies have found that adolescents who listen to music that supports substance abuse and violence have a greater chance to act upon what they listen to. What young adults and teenagers listen to through music and popular media will affect their decision making process. Specifically with substance abuse, and there is a direct uptake in use of illegal substances by adolescents who listen to music that promotes such activities. This can cause a whole societal problem considering most of todays popular music among adolescents touches upon substance abuse and violence. Adolescents are extremely impressionable and the music they listen can shape how a person tries to act, or represent themselves.

    1. The majority of the annotations on this page draw from the following critical editions of The War of the Worlds, which will be cited and tagged according to the last name(s) of the editor(s) of that edition:

      DANAHAY: Martin A. Danahay. The War of the Worlds. Broadview Press, 2003.

      HUGHES AND GEDULD: David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld, eds. A Critical Edition of The War of the Worlds: H. G. Wells’s Scientific Romance, with Introduction and Notes by David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld. Indiana UP, 1993.

      MCCONNELL: Frank McConnell, ed. The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds: A Critical Edition. Oxford UP, 1977.

      STOVER: Leon Stover. The War of the Worlds: A Critical Text of the 1898 London First Edition, with an Introduction, Illustrations and Appendices. McFarland and Company, Inc, 2001.

      Madeline Gangnes has added additional annotations and resources, especially those that address materials related to Pearson's Magazine and adaptations of the text. They are cited with their source(s) (where applicable) and tagged as GANGNES.

    2. This page incorporates several elements. Its main body is a transcription of the text of the ninth installment of H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds as it was published in Pearson's Magazine in December of 1897. This text was created by Madeline Gangnes by comparing the Project Gutenberg text with the digital facsimiles of Pearson's Magazine generously hosted by HathiTrust. Facsimile pages of the installment are interspersed throughout this page. Each image includes a detailed caption in order to facilitate text-to-speech accessibility. Textual markers that indicate the beginning and end of each page's text are incorporated for text-to-speech and to make clear which text corresponds to which page of the magazine.

    1. The majority of the annotations on this page draw from the following critical editions of The War of the Worlds, which will be cited and tagged according to the last name(s) of the editor(s) of that edition:

      DANAHAY: Martin A. Danahay. The War of the Worlds. Broadview Press, 2003.

      HUGHES AND GEDULD: David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld, eds. A Critical Edition of The War of the Worlds: H. G. Wells’s Scientific Romance, with Introduction and Notes by David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld. Indiana UP, 1993.

      MCCONNELL: Frank McConnell, ed. The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds: A Critical Edition. Oxford UP, 1977.

      STOVER: Leon Stover. The War of the Worlds: A Critical Text of the 1898 London First Edition, with an Introduction, Illustrations and Appendices. McFarland and Company, Inc, 2001.

      Madeline Gangnes has added additional annotations and resources, especially those that address materials related to Pearson's Magazine and adaptations of the text. They are cited with their source(s) (where applicable) and tagged as GANGNES.

    2. This page incorporates several elements. Its main body is a transcription of the text of the eighth installment of H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds as it was published in Pearson's Magazine in November of 1897. This text was created by Madeline Gangnes by comparing the Project Gutenberg text with the digital facsimiles of Pearson's Magazine generously hosted by HathiTrust. Facsimile pages of the installment are interspersed throughout this page. Each image includes a detailed caption in order to facilitate text-to-speech accessibility. Textual markers that indicate the beginning and end of each page's text are incorporated for text-to-speech and to make clear which text corresponds to which page of the magazine.

    1. The majority of the annotations on this page draw from the following critical editions of The War of the Worlds, which will be cited and tagged according to the last name(s) of the editor(s) of that edition:

      DANAHAY: Martin A. Danahay. The War of the Worlds. Broadview Press, 2003.

      HUGHES AND GEDULD: David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld, eds. A Critical Edition of The War of the Worlds: H. G. Wells’s Scientific Romance, with Introduction and Notes by David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld. Indiana UP, 1993.

      MCCONNELL: Frank McConnell, ed. The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds: A Critical Edition. Oxford UP, 1977.

      STOVER: Leon Stover. The War of the Worlds: A Critical Text of the 1898 London First Edition, with an Introduction, Illustrations and Appendices. McFarland and Company, Inc, 2001.

      Madeline Gangnes has added additional annotations and resources, especially those that address materials related to Pearson's Magazine and adaptations of the text. They are cited with their source(s) (where applicable) and tagged as GANGNES.

    2. This page incorporates several elements. Its main body is a transcription of the text of the seventh installment of H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds as it was published in Pearson's Magazine in October of 1897. This text was created by Madeline Gangnes by comparing the Project Gutenberg text with the digital facsimiles of Pearson's Magazine generously hosted by HathiTrust. Facsimile pages of the installment are interspersed throughout this page. Each image includes a detailed caption in order to facilitate text-to-speech accessibility. Textual markers that indicate the beginning and end of each page's text are incorporated for text-to-speech and to make clear which text corresponds to which page of the magazine.

    1. The majority of the annotations on this page draw from the following critical editions of The War of the Worlds, which will be cited and tagged according to the last name(s) of the editor(s) of that edition:

      DANAHAY: Martin A. Danahay. The War of the Worlds. Broadview Press, 2003.

      HUGHES AND GEDULD: David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld, eds. A Critical Edition of The War of the Worlds: H. G. Wells’s Scientific Romance, with Introduction and Notes by David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld. Indiana UP, 1993.

      MCCONNELL: Frank McConnell, ed. The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds: A Critical Edition. Oxford UP, 1977.

      STOVER: Leon Stover. The War of the Worlds: A Critical Text of the 1898 London First Edition, with an Introduction, Illustrations and Appendices. McFarland and Company, Inc, 2001.

      Madeline Gangnes has added additional annotations and resources, especially those that address materials related to Pearson's Magazine and adaptations of the text. They are cited with their source(s) (where applicable) and tagged as GANGNES.

    2. This page incorporates several elements. Its main body is a transcription of the text of the sixth installment of H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds as it was published in Pearson's Magazine in September of 1897. This text was created by Madeline Gangnes by comparing the Project Gutenberg text with the digital facsimiles of Pearson's Magazine generously hosted by HathiTrust. Facsimile pages of the installment are interspersed throughout this page. Each image includes a detailed caption in order to facilitate text-to-speech accessibility. Textual markers that indicate the beginning and end of each page's text are incorporated for text-to-speech and to make clear which text corresponds to which page of the magazine.

    1. The majority of the annotations on this page draw from the following critical editions of The War of the Worlds, which will be cited and tagged according to the last name(s) of the editor(s) of that edition:

      DANAHAY: Martin A. Danahay. The War of the Worlds. Broadview Press, 2003.

      HUGHES AND GEDULD: David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld, eds. A Critical Edition of The War of the Worlds: H. G. Wells’s Scientific Romance, with Introduction and Notes by David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld. Indiana UP, 1993.

      MCCONNELL: Frank McConnell, ed. The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds: A Critical Edition. Oxford UP, 1977.

      STOVER: Leon Stover. The War of the Worlds: A Critical Text of the 1898 London First Edition, with an Introduction, Illustrations and Appendices. McFarland and Company, Inc, 2001.

      Madeline Gangnes has added additional annotations and resources, especially those that address materials related to Pearson's Magazine and adaptations of the text. They are cited with their source(s) (where applicable) and tagged as GANGNES.

    2. This page incorporates several elements. Its main body is a transcription of the text of the fifth installment of H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds as it was published in Pearson's Magazine in August of 1897. This text was created by Madeline Gangnes by comparing the Project Gutenberg text with the digital facsimiles of Pearson's Magazine generously hosted by HathiTrust. Facsimile pages of the installment are interspersed throughout this page. Each image includes a detailed caption in order to facilitate text-to-speech accessibility. Textual markers that indicate the beginning and end of each page's text are incorporated for text-to-speech and to make clear which text corresponds to which page of the magazine.

    1. The majority of the annotations on this page draw from the following critical editions of The War of the Worlds, which will be cited and tagged according to the last name(s) of the editor(s) of that edition:

      DANAHAY: Martin A. Danahay. The War of the Worlds. Broadview Press, 2003.

      HUGHES AND GEDULD: David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld, eds. A Critical Edition of The War of the Worlds: H. G. Wells’s Scientific Romance, with Introduction and Notes by David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld. Indiana UP, 1993.

      MCCONNELL: Frank McConnell, ed. The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds: A Critical Edition. Oxford UP, 1977.

      STOVER: Leon Stover. The War of the Worlds: A Critical Text of the 1898 London First Edition, with an Introduction, Illustrations and Appendices. McFarland and Company, Inc, 2001.

      Madeline Gangnes has added additional annotations and resources, especially those that address materials related to Pearson's Magazine and adaptations of the text. They are cited with their source(s) (where applicable) and tagged as GANGNES.

    2. This page incorporates several elements. Its main body is a transcription of the text of the fourth installment of H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds as it was published in Pearson's Magazine in July of 1897. This text was created by Madeline Gangnes by comparing the Project Gutenberg text with the digital facsimiles of Pearson's Magazine generously hosted by HathiTrust. Facsimile pages of the installment are interspersed throughout this page. Each image includes a detailed caption in order to facilitate text-to-speech accessibility. Textual markers that indicate the beginning and end of each page's text are incorporated for text-to-speech and to make clear which text corresponds to which page of the magazine.

  12. Nov 2018
    1. Kompetenzraster des Medienpasses

      Seht euch unter auf dieser Homepage eure Kompetenzbereiche an. Es gibt für JEDEN Kompetenzbereich bereits Materialien.

    2. Zuordnungstabelle

      Prüft, ob die zugeordneten Kompetenzen implementierbar sind - Niemand soll am Ende mehr Arbeit als nötig haben.

  13. Sep 2018
    1. Ceci est une note de page. Elle peut inclure un lien vers une autre page, que celle-ci soit connectée ou non via Hypothes.is. Voyez dans l'URL le préfixe qui assure que l'on peut annoter celle-ci. Mais avec ce blogue on n'en a pas besoin car son auteur a déjà inclus un code permettant de l'annoter par défaut (à condition de s'être créée un compte hypothes.is).

  14. Jun 2018
    1. Today is Privmas Eve

      I'm thinking now that this needs to be a stand-alone page rather than a post. Something timeless rather than a post that scrolls into the past. Thoughts?

  15. Apr 2018
    1. To Save A Mockingbird

      I like the front page being an overview of what has happened both as far as the author and the challenge.

  16. Mar 2018
  17. Feb 2018
  18. Jan 2018
    1. While a traditional discussion forum is separated from the objects being discussed, a more powerful discourse environment is able to incorporate various web objects into discourse to maintain its contexts.

      Same could be said for page bottom comments in online newspapers/magazines.

  19. Dec 2017
    1. Click here

      These instructions will be removed whenever the login portal is live.

  20. Oct 2017
    1. using the style tag and writing the CSS inside it or by using the link tag to link to a style sheet. Either of these tags go in the head portion of your HTML. 

      How to include CSS in a page/site. Goes in the Head

      1. Use <style> tag or</li> <li>Use <link> tag that points to a style sheet.</li> </ol> </style>
    2. One of those themes was reusability. You could describe a style once in CSS and reuse it across multiple elements or even multiple web pages. 0:31Another of those themes was maintainability. Being able to efficiently change your web page in response to changing design requirements. 

      Why CSS

      1. Reusability
      2. Maintainability
  21. Dec 2016
    1. the proof: an entire page of results

      Is the author assuming that most people regard Google Searches as anything more than a result? Gospel? How many people have even a rudimentary understanding of page rank? Whose duty is it make sure they do?

  22. Sep 2016
    1. The morning weighs on my shoulders with the dreadful weight of hope an4 I take the blue envelope which Jacques has sent me and tear it sl6wly into many pieces, watching them . .. . I dance in the wind, watchiμg the wind carry them away. Yet, as I turn and begin walking tovyard the waiting people, the wind blows some of them back on me. ]

      Reading this last paragraph, it seems that not even David knows what will happen next in his life. The idea of having hope that something positive will happen in his life now. Or Giovanni won't be executed is weighing him down because even he knows that isn't realistic. Since the ending is so ambiguous I personally took David tearing the envelope Jacques sent him slowly as him trying to start over, but when he threw it in the wind as he was walking away the wind blows it back to him. Making me believe that even though he wants to start over and forget what has happened he won't be able to move forward because something in his past will keep bringing him down. I also believe that the reason why Baldwin made the ending so ambiguous is because during that time maybe he didn’t know what to do next or how to move on. It was said that Giovanni’s room was based off of actual events that happened to Baldwin before he starting writing this book. Baldwin was in a love affair with a man named Lucien Happersberger who ended up marrying a women and that’s why the book is dedicated to Lucien.

      I tagged an article where Baldwin talks about Giovanni's Room and what it means to him as well as a very short clip of an interview with Baldwin.

  23. Feb 2016
    1. req.Header.Add("Content-Type", writer.FormDataContentType())

      If you're reading this, do not forget the Content-Type. It is not on the initial example, but it is important. I don't understand why the author mentions it here but doesn't use it on the initial source.

  24. Nov 2015
  25. Jul 2015
  26. Apr 2015
    1. Developer

      testing to see if i can search for annotated text within the page - doesn't seem like it

  27. Jan 2015