6 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2019
    1. technology companies have made it work that way. Ebook stores from Amazon, Apple, Google, Kobo, Barnes and Noble all follow broadly the same rules. You’re buying a licence to read, not a licence to own.

      Bear in mind that this "ownership" is common practice with Amazon, Apple, Google, Kobo, Barnes and Noble, and other ones as well.

      It's not this way with non-DRM books, that you can download, and reuse as with physical books.

  2. Aug 2017
    1. without downloading or reading them.

      This is cool but the "reading of them" is the more radical proposition.

    2. Many of the university’s holdings “were invisible to the world,” Coleman says. Google’s involvement promised to change that.

      An important point for those who might immediately dismiss anything Google-related.

    3. “It’s hard to imagine going through a day doing the work we academics do without touching something that wouldn’t be there without Google Book Search,”

      But this is a statement that would align with Somer's lament above, no?

    4. a persistent cultural challenge: how to balance copyright and fair use and keep everybody—authors, publishers, scholars, librarians—satisfied. That work still lies ahead.

      I'll be very interested to see how this gets negotiated moving forward.

  3. Jun 2017
    1. literature became data

      Doesn't this obfuscate the process? Literature became digital. Digital enables a wide range of futther activity to take place on top of literature, including, perhaps, it's datafication.