155 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2021
    1. There is seldom any good reason to use this option. Mixing ERB into your controllers defeats the MVC orientation of Rails and will make it harder for other developers to follow the logic of your project. Use a separate erb view instead.
  2. Dec 2020
    1. It took faaaaaaaaaaaaar too long to signup at this site to reply to you. This site rejected the real address I use for amazon, username.place@cocaine.ninja so I created an email address that I'll never check again just to signup here. I have zero tolerance for spam.
    2. no post edit, eh?Fine.
    1. Guaranteed Installment Loans for Bad Credit

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  3. Nov 2020
    1. DevtoolThis option controls if and how source maps are generated.

      If the option is (only) about source maps, then it should be called something like sourceMapTool instead.

  4. Oct 2020
    1. Just let the user fill in some fields, submit it to the server and if there are any errors notify them and let the user start over again. Is that a good approach? The answer is no, you don't want users to get frustrated waiting for a server round trip to get some form validation result.
    1. One of my favorite things to do with my friends is watching and ridiculing bad rom-coms, and Netflix has several to offer.

      There are many poorly made romcoms on Netflix that I am not proud to say I watched.

    1. Looks like the problem is that debounce defaults to waiting for 0 ms ... which is completely useless!

      It would be (and is) way to easy to omit the 2nd parameter to https://lodash.com/docs/4.17.15#debounce.

      Why is that an optional param with a default value?? It should be required!

      There must be some application where a delay of 0 is useless. https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/lodash-_-debounce-method/ alludes to / implies there may be a use:

      When the wait time is 0 and the leading option is false, then the func call is deferred until to the next tick.

      But I don't know what that use case is. For the use case / application of debouncing user input (where each character of input is delayed by at least 10 ms -- probably > 100 ms -- a delay of 0 seems utterly useless.

    1. just saying that if you're going to try to go with a markup approach, at least go all the way, instead of the frankenstein that is JSX
    2. mixing the turing complete of javascript with the markup of HTML eliminates the readability of JSX so that it is actually harder to parse than a solution like hyperscript
    3. I'm okay with an overall design that allows people to plugin the parts they need in order to be able to generically support a compile-to-javascript language, but to bake in support for one singular solution because its popular is simply bad engineering.
    4. hyperscript is much simpler to refactor and DRY up your code than with JSX, because, being vanilla javascript, its easier to work with variable assignment, loops and conditionals.
    1. cloud

      I noticed how Collins use ‘cloud’ constantly in this narrative, which perhaps foreshadowing a bad omen to come.

  5. Sep 2020
    1. Svelte will not offer a generic way to support style customizing via contextual class overrides (as we'd do it in plain HTML). Instead we'll invent something new that is entirely different. If a child component is provided and does not anticipate some contextual usage scenario (style wise) you'd need to copy it or hack around that via :global hacks.
    1. strict: only validate the input, and skip any coercion or transformation

      transform would have been a more descriptive name.

      strict is pretty ambiguous.

  6. Aug 2020
  7. Jul 2020
    1. the key method for conformation comparison used in this artical is wrong, so the result is not very informative.

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    1. But the business model that we now call surveillance capitalism put paid to that, which is why you should never post anything on Facebook without being prepared to face the algorithmic consequences.

      I'm reminded a bit of the season 3 episode of Breaking Bad where Jesse Pinkman invites his drug dealing pals to a Narcotics Anonymous-type meeting so that they can target their meth sales. Fortunately the two low lifes had more morality and compassion than Facebook can manage.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=20kpzC3sckQ

    1. In fact, developers often tend to forget a simple, almost elementary fact: if users want to close the application or leave a site, they will — doesn’t matter which obstacles are placed on their path to the exit-button. The more obstacles there are the more negative the user experience will be.
    2. Users also don’t like to deal with dozens of opened tabs and some visitors tend to become quickly angry with the disabled back button. Furthermore, some visitors may not even realize that a new window was opened and hit the back-button mercilessly — without any result. That’s not user-friendly, and that’s not a good user experience we, web designers, strive for.
  8. Jun 2020
  9. May 2020
    1. The administration and its allies fear that the more people gravitate toward the successful, free-market self-insurance approach, the worse their government-engineered health “reform” will look. We’re already seeing the beginning of this trend.
    1. revenue

      Why not just call it "total"?

    2. category

      Category sounds like something broader that would contain this product, not a variant of this product (and therefore more specific than the product 'name').

      "variant" would have been a better choice

    1. Unscrupulous providers are incentivized to use inefficient or malicious means to increase break/fix work and thus increase their revenue.
    1. While this is illegal and can result in criminal and civil penalties, your cooperation may make you eligible for up to a US$50,000 reward.

      Might not this motivate someone to conspire with someone else, one to commit the crime and one to collect the reward? Probably mitigated by a contingency that the reward may only be collected if criminal is successfully charged and prosecuted?

    1. This is it. I'm done with Page Translator, but you don't have to be. Fork the repo. Distribute the code yourself. This is now a cat-and-mouse game with Mozilla. Users will have to jump from one extension to another until language translation is a standard feature or the extension policy changes.
    2. Mozilla will never publicly ask users to circumvent their own blocklist. But it's their actions that are forcing people to do so.
    3. So to me, it seems like they want to keep their users safer by... making them use Google Chrome or... exposing themselves to even greater danger by disabling the whole blocklist.
  10. Apr 2020
    1. Qian’s comments reflected Luckin’s obsessive drive to overtake Starbucks, one of the most successful U.S. companies in China. Starbucks opened its first coffee shop in the country in 1999 and now has 4,300 of them. By the time of its initial public offering, not even two years after its founding, Luckin was more than halfway to matching the market leader.

      “We have done what most people do in 15 or 20 years,” Luckin Chief Financial Officer Reinout Schakel told CNBC on the morning of the Nasdaq debut.

      China consumes nine times as much tea as coffee, but Qian saw that statistic as an opportunity. According to an account in Xinhua, the official state news service, she was drinking more and more coffee during long hours at her previous job and grew interested in why coffee hadn’t caught on in China as in other countries and why its cost was so high.

      Until 2017, neither Qian nor Luckin’s chairman and largest shareholder, Charles Zhengyao Lu, had much to do with coffee shops. Lu studied industrial electric automation at the University of Science and Technology in Beijing and worked for the government in the northern city of Shijiazhuang for three years before getting the business itch. He started and ran a string of companies in information technology, telecommunications and automobile services.

      “Entrepreneurship is like a marathon without an end,” he said at an award ceremony for China’s biggest business names in 2016.

      His most successful venture at the time was CAR Inc., a car-rental company that had U.S. financing from Hertz and Warburg Pincus, the private equity firm. It listed on the Hong Kong stock exchange in 2014, and within eight months, its stock value had nearly doubled. The boom was short-lived — the share price dropped below its initial offering price by the beginning of 2016 — but by then Lu, along with Hertz and Warburg Pincus, had sold the bulk of their stakes.

      When Qian stepped up to the Nasdaq podium on May 17, 2019, Luckin had been in operation for just 20 months. Its $17 a share public offering raised another $645 million, and its underwriters included CICC, Morgan Stanley and Credit Suisse.

      On January 7, the company said it had more than 4,500 stores, enough to overtake Starbucks in China.

      Howard Penney, an analyst for the online financial program Hedgeye Risk Management, summed up the optimism surrounding the company’s story line. On Jan. 15, he said that Starbucks would never be able to compete with Luckin in China, and might as well try to acquire it. Penney called Luckin “the most digitally savvy company in the world.”

      Two days later, Luckin’s stock hit its all-time high, just above $51 a share, pushing its market value past $12 billion.

      “China is to stock fraud,” he likes to say, “as Silicon Valley is to technology.”

    1. the body of law derived from judicial decisions of courts and similar tribunals.[1][2][3][4][5][6] The defining characteristic of “common law” is that it arises as precedent.

      The way "common law" sounds and is used, I would have thought it meant law that is common (in common between) many countries, laws that can be found on the books in all of these many places. (Kind of like commonwealth.)

      But, although it is common to many countries, that is not its defining characteristic. Its defining characteristic is actually something quite different.

      Since the term is so far removed from what it actually means, I would even go so far as to say it is a mild euphemism.

      Much better names for this exist: judicial precedent or judge-made law are the clearest options. But even "case law" is a better term.

    1. Suddenly even linking to data was an excuse to get raided by the FBI and potentially face serious charges. Even more concerning is that Brown linked to data that was already public and others had already linked to.
    2. Having said all that, I think this is completely absurd that I have to write an entire article justifying the release of this data out of fear of prosecution or legal harassment. I had wanted to write an article about the data itself but I will have to do that later because I had to write this lame thing trying to convince the FBI not to raid me.
    3. I could have released this data anonymously like everyone else does but why should I have to? I clearly have no criminal intent here. It is beyond all reason that any researcher, student, or journalist have to be afraid of law enforcement agencies that are supposed to be protecting us instead of trying to find ways to use the laws against us.
    4. The key change here is the removal of an intent to defraud and replacing it with willfully; it will be illegal to share this information as long as you have any reason to know someone else might use it for unauthorized computer access.It is troublesome to consider the unintended consequences resulting from this small change.
    5. The problem is that it is that the laws themselves change the very definition of a criminal and put many innocent professionals at risk.
    1. If you force people to frequently change their passwords, they will use bad passwords.
    2. Stop forcing users to change their passwords every 30, 60, or 90 days, and stop forcing users to include a mixture of uppercase, lowercase, and special charactersForcing users to change their passwords should only happen if there is reason to believe an organization has been breached, or if a new third-party data breach affects employees or users.
    1. Once common practice, websites emailing you your password is now severely frowned upon. You'd often see this happen if you'd forgotten your password: you go to the "forgot password page", plug in your email address and get it delivered to your inbox. In fact, this is such a bad practice that there's even a website dedicated to shaming others that do this.
  11. Mar 2020
    1. Google Analytics Premium (later to be renamed Google Analytics 360)

      Google Analytics Premium was a better name, because it is very clear what it is.

      Google Analytics 360 sounds dumb to me. What does 360 have to do with anything?

      Reminds me Xbox Live 360 (and, though an unrelated number, Office 365). Are they copying Microsoft?

      Reminds me of YouTube Red. Where do they come up with this stuff?

    1. It won't let me go beyond this page. I'm sure I've answered the CAPTCHA correctly at least some of the 10+ times I've tried. What's going on?

      I can't even access their static website to find contact information for how to contact them about this problem!

    1. Robots are currently suffering extreme discrimination due to a few false assumptions, mainly that they’re distinctly separate actors from humans. My point of view is that robots and humans often need to behave in the same way, so it’s a fruitless and pointless endeavour to try distinguishing them.
    1. The deceitful obfuscation of commercial intention certainly runs all the way through the data brokering and ad tech industries that sit behind much of the ‘free’ consumer Internet. Here consumers have plainly been kept in the dark so they cannot see and object to how their personal information is being handed around, sliced and diced, and used to try to manipulate them.
    2. From an ad tech perspective, the concern is that manipulation doesn’t work when it’s obvious. And the goal of targeted advertising is to manipulate people’s decisions based on intelligence about them gleaned via clandestine surveillance of their online activity (so inferring who they are via their data). This might be a purchase decision. Equally it might be a vote.
    1. For years, the most used solution was to add an ugly captcha to the form, with some hard to read letters, numbers etc on an image. The user had to type these in an input field. The spambots have a hard time reading these images: problem solved!But this solution is not very user-friendly: it’s ugly, and annoys users so much you might lose conversions.
  12. Feb 2020
    1. When our analysts discovered six vulnerabilities in PayPal – ranging from dangerous exploits that can allow anyone to bypass their two-factor authentication (2FA), to being able to send malicious code through their SmartChat system – we were met with non-stop delays, unresponsive staff, and lack of appreciation. Below, we go over each vulnerability in detail and why we believe they’re so dangerous. When we pushed the HackerOne staff for clarification on these issues, they removed points from our Reputation scores, relegating our profiles to a suspicious, spammy level. This happened even when the issue was eventually patched, although we received no bounty, credit, or even a thanks. Instead, we got our Reputation scores (which start out at 100) negatively impacted, leaving us worse off than if we’d reported nothing at all.

      Paypal is a bad company in many ways. This is one of them.

    1. Automation helps us keep these steps out of our way while maintaining control through fast feedback loops (context-switching is our enemy).
  13. Jan 2020