464 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. you're going to have like 100 million more AI research and they're going to be working at 100 times what 00:27:31 you are

      for - stats - comparison of cognitive powers - AGI AI agents vs human researcher

      stats - comparison of cognitive powers - AGI AI agents vs human researcher - 100 million AGI AI researchers - each AGI AI researcher is 100x more efficient that its equivalent human AI researcher - total productivity increase = 100 million x 100 = 10 billion human AI researchers! Wow!

    2. we are on course for AGI by 2027 and that these AI 00:19:25 systems will basically be able to automate basically all all cognitive jobs think any job that can be done remotely

      for - AI evolution - prediction - 2027 - all cognitive jobs can be done by AI

  2. Jun 2024
    1. Narratives are how we conceptualize the world. Certain narrative links – links between events that we add in to help explain the world – are picked up through mimesis. We see others think of the world in a particular way, and we start to conceptualize the world in similar terms. And the best solution to a harmful narrative is a more enriching narrative. You have to have a replacement for the narrative you are trying to rid yourself of.

      This is equal to the imitation principle of biologically primary knowledge as stated in Cognitive Load Theory (Sweller, 2011). Perhaps also the borrow-and-reorganize principle though that has to do with biologically secondary knowledge and explicit instruction.

  3. May 2024
    1. ***Deep Processing***-> It's important in learning. It's when our brain constructs meaning and says, "Ah, I get it, this makes sense." -> It's when new knowledge establishes connections to your pre-existing knowledge.-> When done well, It's what makes the knowledge easily retrievable when you need it. How do we achieve deep processing in learning? 👉🏽 STORIES, EXPLANATIONS, EXAMPLES, ANALOGIES and more - they all promote deep meaningful processing. 🤔BUT, it's not always easy to come up with stories and examples. It's also time-consuming. You can ask you AI buddies to help with that. We have it now, let's leverage it. Here's a microlesson developed on 7taps Microlearning about this topic.

      Reply to Nidhi Sachdeva: I agree mostly, but I would advice against using AI for this. If your brain is not doing the work (the AI is coming up with the story/analogy) it is much less effective. Dr. Sönke Ahrens already said: "He who does the effort, does the learning."

      I would bet that Cognitive Load Theory also would show that there is much less optimized intrinsic cognitive load (load stemming from the building or automation of cognitive schemas) when another person, or the AI, is thinking of the analogies.


      https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:7199396764536221698/

    1. Instructor presence is required for social presence to occur, and social presence is necessary for cognitive presence (Akyol & Garrison, 2008; Garrison, et al., 2001; Shea & Bidjerano, 2009).  Furthermore, Shea & Bidjerano (2009) purport that “teaching presence predicts variance in cognitive presences directly” (p. 545). As an example, they found that when the instructor focused and participated in discussion, teaching presence correlated to higher cognitive presence.

      Instructor presence leads to social presence which leads to cognitive presence.

    2. The quadrants are cognitive presence indicators, illustrating the sequence of critical thinking: Triggering event – A question or problem; Exploration – The search for information to answer the question or solve the problem; Integration – Making sense of the knowledge found; and Resolution – Applying the idea for confirmation. Garrison et al. (2001) later refined the model and considered integration as a pivotal part of the inquiry process. They noted that it can be difficult to recognize, and must “be inferred from communication within the community of inquiry” (p. 10). In this phase, “teaching presence is essential in moving the process to more-advanced stages of critical thinking and cognitive development” (p. 10), because without it, students may remain comfortable in the exploration phase, and not move into integration or resolution.

      sequence of critical thinking

    3. Garrison et al. (2000) consider cognitive presence a “vital element in critical thinking a process and outcome that is frequently presented as the ostensible goal of all higher education”

      cognitive presence is vital in critical thinking

    4. One of the advantages for the instructor in an online environment is that there is a “concrete interactive trail” (Lamb & Callison, 2005, p. 30), leaving the instructor with a tool for analyzing the paths of cognitive presence throughout the course and among students. Several studies showed that students with high social presence also had increased perceptions of quality learning as well as satisfaction with their instructors

      online environment leaves a trail for analyzing cognitive presence

    5. the extent to which cognitive presence is created and sustained in a community of inquiry is partly dependent on how communication is restricted or encouraged” (Garrison et al., 2000, p.93). Cognitive presence is also evident when students purposefully and collaboratively construct knowledge (Garrison, et al., 2001), resulting in deep meaning, retained knowledge, and critical thinking (Nagel & Kotzé, 2010).

      cognitive presence depends on communication is restricted or encouraged

    6. Garrison et al. (2000) explain that cognitive presence “can best be understood in the context of a general model of critical thinking” (p. 98), and that “what to think…is domain-specific and context-dependent” (p.98).

      cognitive presence -

    1. cognitive presence, is “the extent to which the participants in . . . acommunity of inquiry are able to construct meaning through sustained communication”

      cognitive presence - participants are able to construct meaning through sustained communication.

    1. Perhaps the best method would be to take notes—not excerpts, but condensed reformulations of what has been read. The re-description of what has already been described leads almost automatically to a training of paying attention to “frames,” or schemata of observation, or even to noticing conditions which lead the text to offer some descriptions but not others.

      Summarization. Building of cognitive schemas.

  4. Apr 2024
    1. I hate that I cant select language and fix it at that. Instead my child is expected to answer a multiple choice question each time before the language of choice opens. Which he cant, he's 4! Please fix this. Content also very limited.

      reviews overall are in the 'meh' section. I don't want this to happen. But the application responds and is attempting to assist.

    1. Save Create a Product Children Will Love Pew Research Center reports that the majority of kids in the US actively use digital devices, and many of them have smartphones or tablets of their own. The number of young users tends to increase over time. And design for this interesting (and somewhat challenging) audience is a responsible mission.UX design for kids is not as simple as to just have a few clowns looking funny and some music playing while they use the product. First of all, you must know what difference in terms of demands lies between children and adults.As a design agency we understand the importance of UX specifics when targeting a particular audience, especially a younger one. In this article, we would like to provide insights on what you need to pay attention to when designing a kid-friendly interface. Main niches where design for children is applicable To better understand where a solid design for kids is especially important, take a look at statistics on what content children most interacted with in 2021. Image credit: Statista As we can see, software products and video content are among the most popular. We can name three main niches where child-friendly design is especially needed. EntertainmentEntertainment is the main reason why children use digital products, so it’s no wonder that gaming apps, entertaining platforms and websites make the biggest niche. When designing an entertaining product for children, keep in mind that kids develop an addiction easier, so you need to be ethical in your design decisions.Online learningIt is hard to get children engaged in learning and keep them interested in whatever they study. However, if done right, it can be a very positive experience. Students can appreciate learning something new or improving on what they already know. You can use this insight as a base for online educational platforms for children. For example, include design elements that show progress and achievements.Fintech for childrenYes, children nowadays use fintech products along with adults. The days of cash are behind and the demand for mobile banking and other fintech products for children is growing. Pay extra attention to the safety and usability of such complex products and don’t forget to include and design educational components to increase your teenage users’ financial literacy.  Image credit: Anastasia on Dribble What differs children from adults?  Children are a new, unique, and more demanding audience. Stating the obvious, there are many differences between them and adults. And these differences matter for design. Physical  difference is the first thing to take into account when designing for kids. Children’s motor skills (especially at a young age) are different from those of other age groups. Younger kids’ motoricts change their user behavior. For example, at early age children typically type slowly or have limited control of the mouse. This is something designers have to pay attention to when creating UI for children. Cognitive difference is an even bigger matter to consider if you want to create a great user interface for kids. That’s why it makes sense to dive a bit into the theory of cognitive development. Children’s mental abilities are quite different. Depending on the age, they may lose focus or get bored quickly and in general, are less patient than grown-ups.
    2. Physical  difference is the first thing to take into account when designing for kids. Children’s motor skills (especially at a young age) are different from those of other age groups. Younger kids’ motoricts change their user behavior. For example, at early age children typically type slowly or have limited control of the mouse. This is something designers have to pay attention to when creating UI for children.
    1. However, when used in the classroom or for educational purposes, the design quality and sophistication of multimedia application must be high enough to combine the different elements of the cognitive processes so as to achieve the best mimicking of the teacher. There are different types of multimedia applications available in the market today. T
    1. cognitive skills. Therefore, keeping the designs clean and safe from clutter and distractions is essential. This will help kids get the b

      Which sounds work best for my age group/target audience?

    2. What are the unique UX needs of children?Four critical areas must be considered when designing products and services for children. Cognitive abilities Motor skills Attention span Emotional responses

      Oh awesome can I CITE this? It an online Blog okay because this is great.

    1. emphasises thenecessity of taking note of any serious assertion even if contraryto our own ideas.

      Taking note of any serious ideas which are contrary to our own conceptions is important because this may lead us to new realizations about concretes which in turn leads to new frontiers of knowledge.

      One must find a way to push through potential cognitive dissonance to compare ideas and sharpen them over time.

    1. The current study extends findings from previous research by testing how childhood reading problems in the face of normal general cognitive ability are associated with later cognitive function and decline, whereas previous research has primarily focused on general cognitive ability in childhood.

      So if you can't read in early childhood does it affect cognitive ability in later life or not?

    2. little research has investigated the long-term association of childhood reading with cognitive ageing, and how any such association operates across a longer period over the life course.

      Little research has been done with long term effects of cognitive ageing vs literacy.

    3. cognitive functioning

      Cognitive functioning

    4. Reading problems in childhood were associated with poorer cognitive function in early old age, and associations were partly mediated by education.

      Results of not being able to read - poorer cognitive functions in early old age, partly mediated - ie Bettie was fine.

  5. Mar 2024
    1. 05:25 Clear goals are a prerequisite for the flow state. They free up cognitive load, which, in turn, makes entering flow easier

    1. “Story Is King” differentiated us, we thought, not just because we said it but also becausewe believed it and acted accordingly. As I talked to more people in the industry and learnedmore about other studios, however, I found that everyone repeated some version of thismantra—it didn’t matter whether they were making a genuine work of art or complete dreck,they all said that story is the most important thing. This was a reminder of something thatsounds obvious but isn’t: Merely repeating ideas means nothing. You must act—and think—accordingly. Parroting the phrase “Story Is King” at Pixar didn’t help the inexperienceddirectors on Toy Story 2 one bit. What I’m saying is that this guiding principle, while simplystated and easily repeated, didn’t protect us from things going wrong. In fact, it gave us falseassurance that things would be okay.

      Having a good catch phrase for guidance can become a useless trap if it becomes repeated so frequently that it loses meaning. Guiding principles need to be revisited, actively worked on, and ensconced into daily activities and culture.

      examples: - Google and "don't be evil" - Pixar (and many others) and "story is king" (cross Reference Ed Catmull in Creativity, Inc.) - Pixar and "trust the process" (ibid) #

    1. “Do you know, Watson,” said he, “that it is one of the curses of a mind with a turn like mine that I must look at everything with reference to my own special subject. You look at these scattered houses, and you are impressed by their beauty. I look at them, and the only thought which comes to me is a feeling of their isolation and of the impunity with which crime may be committed there.”

      Indexing the world into a commonplace book, zettelkasten, or other means can create new perspectives on the world in which we live. It thereby helps to prevent the sorts of cognitive bias which we might otherwise fall trap to.

      This example of Homes indexing crime gives him a dramatically different perspective on crime in the countryside to Watson who only sees the beauty in the story of "The Adventure of the Copper Beeches."

  6. Feb 2024
  7. Jan 2024
    1. so 00:40:49 there would be a mixture and my feeling is if you can't use the tool every single time it gets to be a bit of a hassle that oh today I'm using it tomorrow I'm not using it you you you 00:41:01 you sort of it becomes a cognitive effort to work the tool because you're not working the tool every day it'd be like changing from Mac to Windows every two days it's like oh c how do I do it 00:41:15 how okay it's there and that's not the sort of question you need to ask you don't want to ask yourself that sort of question in the booth you don't have time so you want everything to be very quick

      cognitive effort, switching mode of working, sometimes tool (booth helper), sometimes not.

    1. the other uh the other type of pansexism is what Chris and and um and Carl friston are doing which is 00:48:04 to reformulate basic physics as fundamentally first a uh a proto-cognitive process

      for - definition - proto-cognitive panpsychism

      definition - proto-cognitive panpsychism - this holds that physics itself is an edge phenomena of a much deeper underlying reality which has an element of cognition

    2. if 00:12:01 you're some some alien species that has the ability to literally care about every other being on your planet right in the linear range I mean humans I don't think can do that

      for: - adjacency - between - cognitive cone - bodhisattva -adjacency statement - Bodhisattva could be such a being that Michael Levin refers to

      • If you're some some alien species
      • that has the ability to literally care about every other being on your planet right in the linear range
        • I don't think humans can do that but
      • if there is a creature somewhere that has that level of advance
        • where they can actually have care and compassion for every being and they work towards it
        • they would have a much larger cognitively cone than we do you know more more advanced in that way
    1. thus we have a very highly developed system designed to overcome the limitations in ordinary human perception

      for - key insight - adjacency between - dzogchen training - trekcho - cutting through training - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trekch%C3%B6 - togal - https://www.rigpawiki.org/index.php? title=T%C3%B6gal - cognitive science - evolutionary biology - adjacency statement - It is very interesting that we find parallels between - Dzogchen practice and - our consciousness's attempt to overcome the limits of its own perceptions of reality

  8. Dec 2023
    1. Chess titans have anywhere from 20,000 to 100,000 configurations of pieces, or patterns, committed to memory. They are able to quickly pull relevant information from this mammoth database. With a mere glance, a grandmaster can then figure out how the configuration in front of him is likely to play itself out.

      is this from Ognjen Amidzic's research on chess and memory?

    1. 04:18 All flow triggers are either (a) reducing cognitive load, or (b) increasing dopamine or norepinephrine, that drive focus.

      Rian Doris people to first start reducing cognitive load. People are overwhelmed and feel like they can't take on new habits and tactics. He recommends to remove clutter from one's life. The more clutter we remove, the more time is left for flow.

  9. Nov 2023
    1. about 20 years ago francisco varela introduced a completely new idea in cognitive neurosciences he said that in order to progress in the understanding of the mind 00:08:24 science cannot rely only on the study of cerebral activity but has to create a rigorous method to study human experience
      • for: cognitive neuroscience - shift from study of cerebral function alone, Fransisco Verella, cognitive neuroscience - study of lived experience
  10. Oct 2023
    1. Web components encapsulate all their HTML, CSS and JS within a single file

      Huh? There's nothing inherent to Web Components that makes this true. That's just how the author is using them.

    1. there's a lot of um dissonance confusion that we live as if living a normal life while watching news in our our pocket a kind 00:08:00 of planet in our pocket that says everything's falling apart and yet we go to the shop and we buy our milk and we walk back home as if things were normal so that's kind of the metac 00:08:12 crisis too it's the experience of of confusion that's now baked into our lives as we hear about our world collapsing on the news and on our phones 00:08:25 but often live as if life could carry on forever
      • for: cognitive dissonance, local vs global, polycrisis - cognitive dissonance
    1. 09:00 increases performance increasing neurochemicals & lowering cognitive load - these drive you into flow state, which releases a bunch of other neurochemicals - intrinsic motivation leads into flow, the flow state highers intrinsic motivation, (virtuous cycle)

    1. so we take two uh things that whose size we know could be our thumbs it could be oranges could be poker chips and look at them have one twice as far away as the other first thing to think about is you know as far as our brain and our

      Poker chip example really well explained at the Reality Distortion Kit at the stanford lecture

  11. Sep 2023
    1. But the last question, What of it?, requires considerable restraint on the part of the reader. It is here that the situationwe described earlier may occur-namely, the situation in whichthe reader says, "I cannot fault the author's conclusions, butI nevertheless disagree with them." This comes about, of course,because of the prejudgments that the reader is likely to haveconcerning the author's approach and his conclusions.

      How to protect against these sorts of outcomes? Relation to identity and cognitive biases?

    2. e hard scientist doesis to say that he "stipulates his usage"-that is, he informs youwhat terms are essential to his argument and how he is goingto use them. Such stipulations usually occur at the beginningof the book, in the form of definitions, postulates, axioms, andso forth. Since stipulation of usage is characteristic of thesefields, it has been said that they are like games or have a"game structure."

      Depending on what level a writer stipulates their usage, they may come to some drastically bad conclusions. One should watch out for these sorts of biases.

      Compare with the results of accepting certain axioms within mathematics and how that changes/shifts one's framework of truth.

      • for: bio-buddhism, buddhism - AI, care as the driver of intelligence, Michael Levin, Thomas Doctor, Olaf Witkowski, Elizaveta Solomonova, Bill Duane, care drive, care light cone, multiscale competency architecture of life, nonduality, no-self, self - illusion, self - constructed, self - deconstruction, Bodhisattva vow
      • title: Biology, Buddhism, and AI: Care as the Driver of Intelligence
      • author: Michael Levin, Thomas Doctor, Olaf Witkowski, Elizaveta Solomonova, Bill Duane, AI - ethics
      • date: May 16, 2022
      • source: https://www.mdpi.com/1099-4300/24/5/710/htm

      • summary

        • a trans-disciplinary attempt to develop a framework to deal with a diversity of emerging non-traditional intelligence from new bio-engineered species to AI based on the Buddhist conception of care and compassion for the other.
        • very thought-provoking and some of the explanations and comparisons to evolution actually help to cast a new light on old Buddhist ideas.
        • this is a trans-disciplinary paper synthesizing Buddhist concepts with evolutionary biology
    1. the bodhisattva vial which is which is huge 01:16:56 um it's this it's this commitment it's it's a medical it's the commitment to enlarge your cognitive apparatus to enable bigger goals to enable you to pursue bigger goals with more compassion
      • for: bio-buddhism, bodhisattva vow, compassion
      • comment
        • interesting adjacency between:
          • Buddhism and
          • biology:
        • Adjacency statement
          • The bodhisattva vow is a commitment to enlarge your cognitive apparatus, your cognitive light cone of compassion to enable the pursuit of bigger goals
      • for: bioelectrical networks, cognitive glue, Charles Darwin's Agential materials, bio-buddhism, Michael Levin
      • annotate
    1. ou certainly have a light cone that does not belong to any of your pieces
      • for: individual / collective gestalt, Deep Humanity, superorganism, multi-level superorganism, major evolutionary transition, MET, cognitive light cone, umwelt

      • paraphrase

        • a human being certainly has a light cone that does not belong to any of its pieces (ie cells)
        • at the conscious level of a human being, we have
          • goals
          • preferences
          • hopes
          • dreams
          • narratives
        • humans occupy spaces that do not belong to our individual cells, tissues or organs
          • those smaller parts work in
            • physiological space
            • transcriptional space
            • biomolecular space
        • When we were an embryo we worked in morphogenetic space
      • comment

        • Since MET implies that these smaller structures of which we are constituted like
          • cells and
          • sub-cellular structures like mitochondria
        • were descended from individual organisms long ago in deep history, those contemporary proxies are occupying their own umwelt
    1. Phenomenal consciousness is only seemingly private because in order to measure it one needs to be in the appropriate cognitive frame of reference. It is not a simple transformation to change from a third-person cognitive frame of reference to the first-person frame, but in principle it can be done, and hence phenomenal consciousness isn’t private anymore.
      • for: relativistic theory of consciousness, question, question - shifting cognitive frames
      • question
        • How is this transformation done?
    1. Recent work has revealed several new and significant aspects of the dynamics of theory change. First, statistical information, information about the probabilistic contingencies between events, plays a particularly important role in theory-formation both in science and in childhood. In the last fifteen years we’ve discovered the power of early statistical learning.

      The data of the past is congruent with the current psychological trends that face the education system of today. Developmentalists have charted how children construct and revise intuitive theories. In turn, a variety of theories have developed because of the greater use of statistical information that supports probabilistic contingencies that help to better inform us of causal models and their distinctive cognitive functions. These studies investigate the physical, psychological, and social domains. In the case of intuitive psychology, or "theory of mind," developmentalism has traced a progression from an early understanding of emotion and action to an understanding of intentions and simple aspects of perception, to an understanding of knowledge vs. ignorance, and finally to a representational and then an interpretive theory of mind.

      The mechanisms by which life evolved—from chemical beginnings to cognizing human beings—are central to understanding the psychological basis of learning. We are the product of an evolutionary process and it is the mechanisms inherent in this process that offer the most probable explanations to how we think and learn.

      Bada, & Olusegun, S. (2015). Constructivism Learning Theory : A Paradigm for Teaching and Learning.

    1. This is problematic if we wish to collect widespread metadata for an entity, for the purposes of annotation and networked collaboration. While nothing in the flat-hash ID scheme stops someone from attempting to fork data by changing even a single bit, thereby resulting in a new hash value, this demonstrates obvious malicious intention and can be more readily detected. Furthermore, most entities should have cryptographic signatures, making such attacks less feasible. With arbitrary path naming, it is not clear whether a new path has been created for malicious intent or as an artifact of local organizational preferences. Cryptographic signatures do not help here, because the original signed entity remains unchanged, with its original hash value, in the leaf of a new Merkle tree.

      Author is conflating multiple things.

    1. And, of course, just to be completely clear, this is valid syntax:let _true = true;_true++;_true; // -> 2

      Of course it is. Why wouldn't it be?

  12. Aug 2023
    1. In finance, the greater fool theory suggests that one can sometimes make money through the purchase of overvalued assets — items with a purchase price drastically exceeding the intrinsic value — if those assets can later be resold at an even higher price.
    1. these are the seven main thrusts of the series
      • for: societal design, designing societies, societal architecture, transforming society, whole system change, SSO, social superorganism, John Boik

      The seven main ideas for societal design: 1. societal transformation - is necessary to avoid catastrophe 2. the specific type of transformation is science-based transformation based on entirely new systems - de novo design - 3. A practical way to implement the transformation in the real world - it must be economical, and doable within the short time window for system change before us. - Considering a time period of 50 years for total change, with some types of change at a much higher priority than others. - The change would be exponential so starting out slower, and accelerating - Those communities that are the first to participate would make the most rapid improvements. 4. Promoting a worldview of society as a social superorganism, a cognitive organism, and its societal systems as a cognitive architecture. 5. Knowing the intrinsic purpose of a society - each subsystem must be explained in terms of the overall intrinsic purpose. 6. The reason for transformation - Transformation that improves cognition reduces the uncertainty that our society's intrinsic purpose is fulfilled. 7. Forming a partnership between the global science community and all the local communities of the world.

    1. It was after he heard a BBC interview with Marvin Minsky, a founding father of artificial intelligence, who had famously pronounced that the human brain is “just a computer made of meat.” Minsky‘s claims compelled Penrose to write The Emperor‘s New Mind, arguing that human thinking will never be emulated by a machine. The book had the feel of an extended thought experiment on the non-algorithmic nature of consciousness and why it can only be understood in relation to Gödel‘s theorem and quantum physics.↳Minsky, who died last year, represents a striking contrast to Penrose‘s quest to uncover the roots of consciousness. “I can understand exactly how a computer works, although I’m very fuzzy on how the transistors work,” Minsky told me during an interview years ago. Minsky called consciousness a “suitcase word” that lacks the rigor of a scientific concept. “We have to replace it by ‘reflection’ and ‘decisions’ and about a dozen other things,” he said. “So instead of talking about the mystery of consciousness, let‘s talk about the 20 or 30 really important mental processes that are involved. And when you’re all done, somebody says, ‘Well, what about consciousness?’ and you say, ‘Oh, that’s what people wasted their time on in the 20th century.‘ ”↳But the study of consciousness has not gone the way Minsky had hoped. It‘s now a cottage industry in neuroscience labs and a staple of big-think conferences around the world. Hameroff is one of the driving forces behind this current enthusiasm. For years he and Chalmers have run the biennial “Toward a Science of Consciousness” conference that features dozens of speakers, ranging from hardcore scientists to New Age guru Deepak Chopra and lucid dream expert Stephen LaBerge. Hameroff‘s connection to Penrose also goes back decades. He first contacted Penrose after reading The Emperor‘s New Mind, suggesting he might have the missing biological component that would complement Penrose‘s ideas about the physics of consciousness.

      人工智能之父马文·明斯基(Marvin Minsky)曾经提出过一个著名的说法,人类大脑只不过是「一台用肉做的计算机」。

      明斯基这一论断迫使彭罗斯很快写出了《皇帝新脑》,并在书中指出人类的思维永远不可能被机器模仿。这本书给人的感觉就好像跟着作者进行了一次关于意识非算法性质的脑内实验,以及为什么我们只能通过理解哥德尔定理和量子物理学来理解人类的意识。

      已故于 2016 年的明斯基代表着另外一种截然不同观点,与彭罗斯对意识根源的探索形成了鲜明对比。在很多年前的一次采访中,明斯基曾经告诉笔者,「虽然我完全搞不懂晶体管的工作原理,但我能准确地理解计算机的工作原理。」

      明斯基曾经将意识称为一种「皮包词语」,正因为它缺乏科学概念所必需的严谨性。「我们必须要用反思(Reflection)或者决定(Decisions)这样的词来替换意识一词,」明斯基说,「这样一来,与其讨论意识的神秘面纱,我们不如讨论一下意识过程中涉及到的 20 到 30 个重要的心理历程。当你真的完成了所有这些工作后,如果还有人问道,『那什么是意识呢?』你就可以回答说,『那玩意不过是 20 世纪时人类浪费时间的一种方式。』」

      中文译文来自微信公众号「利维坦(liweitan2014)」2020 年的推送「意识无法被计算吗?

    2. Penrose‘s theory promises a deeper level of explanation. He starts with the premise that consciousness is not computational, and it’s beyond anything that neuroscience, biology, or physics can now explain. “We need a major revolution in our understanding of the physical world in order to accommodate consciousness,“ Penrose told me in a recent interview. ”The most likely place, if we‘re not going to go outside physics altogether, is in this big unknown—namely, making sense of quantum mechanics.“↳ Nautilus Members enjoy an ad-free experience. Log in or Join now. He draws on the basic properties of quantum computing, in which bits (qubits) of information can be in multiple states—for instance, in the “on” or “off” position—at the same time. These quantum states exist simultaneously—the “superposition”—before coalescing into a single, almost instantaneous, calculation. Quantum coherence occurs when a huge number of things—say, a whole system of electrons—act together in one quantum state.↳It was Hameroff‘s idea that quantum coherence happens in microtubules, protein structures inside the brain’s neurons. And what are microtubules, you ask? They are tubular structures inside eukaryotic cells (part of the cytoskeleton) that play a role in determining the cell‘s shape, as well as its movements, which includes cell division—separation of chromosomes during mitosis. Hameroff suggests that microtubules are the quantum device that Penrose had been looking for in his theory. In neurons, microtubules help control the strength of synaptic connections, and their tube-like shape might protect them from the surrounding noise of the larger neuron. The microtubules‘ symmetry and lattice structure are of particular interest to Penrose. He believes “this reeks of something quantum mechanical.” ↳Still, you‘d need more than just a continuous flood of random moments of quantum coherence to have any impact on consciousness. The process would need to be structured, or orchestrated, in some way so we can make conscious choices. In the Penrose-Hameroff theory of Orchestrated Objective Reduction, known as Orch-OR, these moments of conscious awareness are orchestrated by the microtubules in our brains, which—they believe—have the capacity to store and process information and memory.↳“Objective Reduction” refers to Penrose‘s ideas about quantum gravity—how superposition applies to different spacetime geometries—which he regards as a still-undiscovered theory in physics. All of this is an impossibly ambitious theory that draws on Penrose’s thinking about the deep structure of the universe, from quantum mechanics to relativity. As Smolin has said, “All Roger‘s thoughts are connected … twistor theory, his philosophical thinking, his ideas about quantum mechanics, his ideas about the brain and the mind.”

      对于意识的本质问题,彭罗斯的理论提出了一种更深层的解读。他的理论基于一个前提假设,即意识无法被计算,而且它绝非神经科学、生物学和物理学现阶段能够解释的问题。

      在 2017 年的一次采访中,彭罗斯告诉笔者,「为了理解并认知意识,我们首先要经历一次对于物理世界的巨大认知变革。至于那个可以研究意识本质的领域,如果我们不打算完全脱离物理学范畴的话,那么该领域最有可能一直存在于那个巨大的谜题中,换句话说,我们首先要解开量子物理的谜题。」

      彭罗斯将量子计算的基本特性吸收到他的理论中,即每一比特的信息,即量子位(Qubit)可以同时表现为多种状态,比如同时既是「激活」的,又是「未激活」的。在一次几乎是瞬间完成的计算之前,这些量子态(Quantum States)并未聚合(Coalescing),而是同时存在的,即叠加态(Ssuperposition)。而量子相干性(Quantum Coherence)只有在大量事件在量子态下同时发生的时候才会出现——比如某系统中的大量电子相互作用。

      对此,哈默洛夫认为量子相干性发生于微管(Microtubule)中,这是一种大脑神经元内部的蛋白质结构。也许读者会好奇所谓微管到底是什么东西:它们是存在于真核细胞中的管状结构,可以把它看成是细胞骨架(Cytoskeleton)的一部分,它们可以在细胞活动时发挥决定性作用,这些细胞活动也包括细胞分裂在内,比如在有丝分裂时决定染色体的分离。

      哈默洛夫认为,这些微管就是彭罗斯一直在为自己理论寻找的一种「量子装置」。在神经元中,微管可以帮助控制突触的连接强度,而它们管状的结构可以帮助它们免受周围更大的神经元带来的噪音影响。这些微管的对称、晶格结构恰恰是彭罗斯最感兴趣的。他相信这样的特征「散发着某种量子物理的气味」。

      不过,想要对意识产生任何影响,你需要的不仅仅是随机且持续发生的量子相干性事件。这个过程首先要经过某种方式重组,或者重新经过精心的编排,人类正是因为这一重组过程才能做出有意识的选择。在彭罗斯与哈默洛夫提出的协同客观崩现(Orchestrated Objective Reduction,简称「Orch-OR」)理论中,他们认为人类大脑中的微管会精密编排、操纵这些有意识的瞬间,而正是这样的瞬间给了人脑处理信息并存储记忆的能力。

      所谓「客观崩现」的概念则要涉及到彭罗斯对量子引力——即叠加态如何应用于不同的多个时空几何结构——方面的观点,他也把该理论视为目前物理学尚未发现的理论。然而所有这一切都是一个不可能被验证的、野心勃勃的假说,这个假说不过是借鉴了彭罗斯在量子力学领域和相对论领域对宇宙深层结构的思考。正如斯莫林说过的另一句话:「罗杰的所有观点都是相互勾连的扭量理论(Twistor Theory),无论是他的哲学思想、那些关于量子力学的观点,还是关于人类大脑与心灵的观点。」

      中文译文来自微信公众号「利维坦(liweitan2014)」2020 年的推送「意识无法被计算吗?

  13. Jul 2023
    1. Why are we drawn to people who are clearly not 00:20:59 in the business of public service but want to abuse us and often show us that they are strong men who are oriented towards conquering and dominating rather than serving us? And that puts the mirror back on us. And the answer, I think, is partly to do with evolutionary psychology.
      • key observation
        • we often vote for "strong men" who are not in the business of public service but are oriented towards conquering and dominating due to a cognitive bias developed from tens of thousands of years of evolution.
        • in ancient times, a physically strong man to lead us often increased our chances of survival.
        • This is no longer true today, but that cognitive bias is still with us because evolution takes a long time.
        • Hence, this cognitive bias to select strong men is maladaptive today.
    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b1_RKu-ESCY

      Lots of controversy over this music video this past week or so.

      In addition to some of the double entendre meanings of "we take care of our own", I'm most appalled about the tacit support of the mythology that small towns are "good" and large cities are "bad" (or otherwise scary, crime-ridden, or dangerous).

      What are the crime statistics per capita about the safety of small versus large?

      Availability bias of violence and crime in the big cities are overly sampled by most media (newspapers, radio, and television). This video plays heavily into this bias.

      There's also an opposing availability bias going on with respect to the positive aspects of small communities "taking care of their own" when in general, from an institutional perspective small towns are patently not taking care of each other or when they do its very selective and/or in-crowd based rather than across the board.

      Note also that all the news clips and chyrons are from Fox News in this piece.

      Alternately where are the musicians singing about and focusing on the positive aspects of cities and their cultures.

    1. In the first half of the 2021-22 school year, the average K-12 student accessed 74 different education technology products, platforms or services while the average K-12 teacher interacted with 86 different tools in the course of their work.
  14. May 2023
    1. https://pressbooks.pub/illuminated/

      A booklet prepared for teachers that introduces key concepts from the Science of Learning (i.e. cognitive neuroscience). The digital booklet is the result of a European project. Its content have been compiled from continuing professional development workshops for teachers and features evidence-based teaching practices that align with our knowledge of the Science of Learning.

    1. High power, and to some extent status, creates psychological distance from others (13).Power thus leads to higher cognitive construal level, allowing the powerful to follow theirdispositions

      "Cognitive construals are described by Coley and Tanner (2012, 2015) as deeply held cognitive frameworks. They are interpretations of the world that, while useful in some contexts, can be broadly misapplied."

  15. Apr 2023
    1. Wow, this is me. A friend once analogized it to being like a light source. I am a laser, deeply penetrating a narrow spot, but leaving the larger field in the dark while I do so. Other people are like a floodlight, illuminating a large area, but not deeply penetrating any particular portion of it.

      This way of thinking should be treated with care (caution, even), lest it end up undergirding a belief in a false dichotomy.

      That can be a sort of "attractive people are shallow and dumb and unattractive people are intelligent and deep"-style mindtrap.

    1. It sounds like the non-enthusiast “reimplement everything in my favorite language” answer is that Go’s FFI is a pain, even for C.

      Relative to the experience that Golang developers are used to, yes, it's a pain.

      But that isn't to say it's any more or less painful on an absolute scale, esp. wrt what comprises typical experiences in other ecosystems.

    1. I am extremely gentle by nature. In high school, a teacher didn’t believe I’d read a book because it looked so new. The binding was still tight.

      I see this a lot—and it seems like it's a lot more prevalent than it used to be—reasoning from a proxy. Like trying to suss out how competent someone is in your shared field by looking at their GitHub profile, instead just asking them questions about it (e.g. the JVM). If X is the thing you want to know about, then don't look at Y and draw conclusions that way. (See also: the X/Y problem.) There's no need to approach things in a roundabout, inefficient, error-prone manner, so don't bother trying unless you have to.

  16. Mar 2023
    1. the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released its “synthesis” report summarizing the findings of its sixth assessment (the last occurred in 2014). The findings are painfully familiar: the world is falling far short of its emission goals, and without rapid reductions this decade, the planet is likely to shoot to beyond 1.5 or even 2 degrees Celsius of warming this century (we are at 1.1 degrees now). We seem to be stuck in a doom-loop news cycle where scientific reports create headlines, and earnest climate commentators insist the new report represents a true “wake-up call” for action, and then . . . emission keep rising. They hit a record once again in 2022. The world of climate politics appears to exist in two completely different worlds. There is a largely liberal and idealist world of climate technocrats where science informs policy, and there is the real, material capitalist world of power.
      • A good observation
        • about the cognitive dissonance of the situation
    1. Common sense is actually a pretty bad indicator of truth. Because of cognitive biases and preconceived opinions, ideas that sound right are often wrong. “Common sense is actually nothing more than a deposit of prejudices laid down in the mind prior to the age of eighteen,” Einstein presumably said.
    1. Yes, this can be managed by a package-lock.json

      This shouldn't even be an argument. package-lock.json isn't free. It's like cutting all foods with Vitamin C out of your diet and then saying, "but you can just take vitamin supplements." The recommended solution utterly fails to account for the problem in the first place, and therefore fails to justify itself as a solution.

    1. It isn't a good long term solution unless you really don't care at all about disk space or bandwidth (which you may or may not).

      Give this one another go and think it through more carefully.

  17. Feb 2023
    1. i'll ask now maurice to tell us a bit about his work
      • = Maurice Benayoun
      • describes his extensive history of cognitive science infused art installations:
      • cognitive art,
      • VR art,
      • AR art and
      • art infused by AI (long before the AI artbots became trendy)
      • title = What can cognitive science bring to art and museums?

      • Comment = Maurice Benayoun has applied cognitive science, VR and AR too many at installations throughout his life.

    2. to guide you through this 00:06:24 model very quickly was first published in 2004 it's a lot cited in the field of empirical aesthetics it tries to explain how we process artworks by claiming that there are perceptual analyzers followed by 00:06:38 implicit memory integrations or familiarity aspects then explicit classifications where the perceiver in his perception perceives the style or the content 00:06:51 and then followed by later stages that we called cognitive mastering
      • Cognitive science model of what happens in the brain of a perceiver of art
      • The model was first published in 2004 it's cited often in the field of empirical aesthetics
      • it tries to explain how we process artworks by claiming that:
        • there are perceptual analyzers followed by
        • implicit memory integrations or familiarity aspects then
        • explicit classifications where the perceiver in his perception perceives the style or the content
        • followed by later stages that we called cognitive mastering
    3. cognitive scientists can also provide museums and artists with a specific understanding of how the interaction between artworks and viewers can operate 00:02:34 so to discuss potential applications of cognitive sciences to museums and art
      • cognitive science can provide museums and artists with a specific understanding
      • of how the interaction between artworks and viewers can operate
      • this meeting explores potential applications of cognitive sciences to museums and art
    1. Collecting does not transform us and always postpones learning and transformation to the future. Collecting creates debt that we promise to pay back in some future that never arrives.

      There's some truth and falsity here...

    1. belief perseverance
      • belief perseverance
      • definition
        • a cognitive bias in which people encountering evidence that runs counter to their beliefs will, instead of reevaluating what they’ve believed up until now, tend to reject the incompatible evidence
    2. Confronting facts that don’t line up with your worldview may trigger a “backfire effect,”
      • Confronting facts that don’t line up with your worldview
      • may trigger a “backfire effect,”

      • Comment

        • in contentious issues, merely presenting facts may more deeply entrench there other's held beliefs
    3. It can feel like an attack on you if one of your strongly held beliefs is challenged.
      • It can feel like an attack on you
      • if one of your strongly held beliefs is challenged.

      • Comment

        • question
          • what causes a strongly held belief?
          • what makes use feel a threat?
          • why does it generate fear in some but not others?
    1. people’s desire for sweet and fatty tasting foods.
      • example
        • people’s desire for sweet and fatty tasting foods
        • In ancestral times,
          • sugar and fat typically signaled positive nutritional value (Ramirez, 1990).
          • Consequently, people’s sensory systems are designed
          • to detect the presence of sugar or fat in food,
          • and the brain’s gustatory centers produce desirable taste sensations
          • when those foods are consumed.
          • This would have served our ancestors well,
          • facilitating the choice of beneficial and nutritious foods.
        • in modern times
          • Many foods found in post-industrialized societies
          • contain processed sugars, hydrogenated oils, and other additives that enhance the taste of the food
          • without adding any nutritional benefits.
          • Foods laden with corn syrup, for example,
          • typically contain high numbers of calories
          • and their regular consumption can result in obesity, diabetes, and other problems.
        • Thus, the mismatch between
        • the features of ancestral versus modern foodstuffs
        • can lead adaptive sensory mechanisms
        • to produce maladaptive physiological consequences.
        • The desire for sweet and fat foods
        • promotes health problems,
        • even when this desire operates in a perfectly normal manner
        • and would produce health benefits
        • in the environment for which it was designed
    2. Some of the challenges people face today, however, diverge quite a bit from those faced by their ancestors. Such divergences can lead adaptive psychological mechanisms to “misfire” – to respond in ways that might have been adaptive in the past, but that no longer produce adaptive consequences today.
      • Some of the challenges people face today,
      • diverge quite a bit from those
      • faced by their ancestors.
      • Such divergences can ,- lead adaptive psychological mechanisms to “misfire”
      • to respond in ways that might have been adaptive in the past,
      • but that no longer produce adaptive consequences today.
    3. Psychological adaptations have been designed over thousands of generations of human evolution. The adaptations humans possess today, then, were designed to operate in the Environment of Evolutionary Adaptedness, a composite of the social and physical challenges as they have existed for hundreds of thousands of years
      • Psychological adaptations have been designed over thousands of generations of human evolution.
      • The adaptations humans possess today, then,
      • were designed to operate in the Environment of Evolutionary Adaptedness,
      • a composite of the social and physical challenges as they have existed for hundreds of thousands of years (Bowlby, 1969; Cosmides & Tooby, 1992).
      • As such, they may or may not be well-adapted
      • for life in contemporary society
    4. we describe a conceptual framework for understanding adaptive sources of dysfunction – for identifying and combating “adaptations gone awry.”
      • we describe a conceptual framework
      • for understanding adaptive sources of dysfunction
      • for identifying and combating “adaptations gone awry.”
    5. Each reflects the operation of psychological mechanisms that were designed through evolution to serve important adaptive functions, but that nevertheless can produce harmful consequences.
      • Each of these 4 problems
        • anxiety disorder
        • domestic violence
        • racial prejudice
        • obesity
      • reflects the operation of psychological mechanisms
      • that were designed through evolution
      • to serve important adaptive functions, - but that nevertheless can produce harmful consequences.
    6. What do anxiety disorders, domestic violence, racial prejudice, and obesity all have in common?
      • question
        • What do
          • anxiety disorders,
          • domestic violence,
          • racial prejudice, and
          • obesity
      • all have in common?
      • answer
        • maladaptive cognitive biases!
    7. mismatches between current environments and ancestral environments
      • cognitive biases may cause dysfunction due to mismatches between:
        • current environments and
        • ancestral environments
    8. from aggression and international conflict to overpopulation and the destruction of the environment, people display a capacity for great selfishness and antisocial behavior. Can an evolutionary perspective – with its inherent focus on the functionality of human behavior – help explain the occasionally self-destructive and maladaptive side of human nature?
      • from aggression and international conflict to overpopulation and the destruction of the environment,
      • people display a capacity for great selfishness and antisocial behavior.
      • Can an evolutionary perspective
      • with its inherent focus on the functionality of human behavior
      • help explain the occasionally self-destructive and maladaptive side of human nature?
    9. Relative to the evolutionary past, social relationships in modernized western societies tend to involve a much wider variety of relationships, along with relatively less immediate connection with close, kin-based support networks
      • Relative to the evolutionary past,
      • social relationships
      • in modernized western societies
      • tend to involve
      • a much wider variety of relationships,
      • along with relatively less immediate connection
      • with close, kin-based support networks
    10. From an evolutionary perspective, social anxiety is designed primarily to help people ensure an adequate level of social acceptance and, throughout most of human history, this meant acceptance in a tightly-knit group based primarily of biological kin
      • From an evolutionary perspective, - social anxiety is designed primarily
      • to help people ensure
      • an adequate level of social acceptance and,
      • throughout most of human history,
      • this meant acceptance
      • in a tightly-knit group
      • based primarily of biological kin
    11. Although social anxiety can serve useful functions, it can also involve excessive worry, negative affect, and exaggerated avoidance of social situations. Understanding the root causes of anxiety-related problems is an essential step in the development of interventions and policies to reduce dysfunction.
      • Although social anxiety can serve useful functions,
      • it can also involve excessive worry, negative affect, and exaggerated avoidance of social situations.
      • Understanding the root causes of anxiety-related problems
      • is an essential step
      • in the development of
      • interventions and policies
      • to reduce dysfunction.
  18. Jan 2023
    1. On the other hand, it means that you now need to trust that Apple isn’t going to fuck with the podcasts you listen to.

      There really is no substantial increase in trust. You were already trusting their player to do the right thing.

    1. Premium feeds are rehosted by Apple and it's huge PITA because we have ad-supported public feeds and ad-free premium feeds and need to build them twice.

      The author here makes it sound like they have to reach out and grab content stream chunks, stitch them together with their own hands, and then plonk them down on the assembly line for 14 hours a day or something.

      It's a program. You write a program that does the building.

    1. 个人学习可能取决于他人行为的主张突出了将学习环境视为一个涉及多个互动参与者的系统的重要性
  19. Dec 2022
    1. At its most tame, Ancient Apocalypse simply reinforces a deeply conservative understanding of human history. Conservative, yes, because despite Hancock’s claim to challenge every orthodoxy going, his ideas—like those of Ignatius Loyola Donnelly, Erich von Däniken, and other so-called “pseudo-archaeologists”—rest on a baseline assumption that technology should always be advancing in linear fashion, from primitive simplicity to modern complexity.

      There is a broad, conservative baseline assumption within much of archaeology that technology always proceeds in a linear fashion from primitive simplicity to modern complexity.

      Archaeologists and historians need to watch carefully for this cognitive bias.

    1. programs with type errors must still be specified to have a well-defined semantics

      Use this to explain why Bernhardt's JS wat (or, really, folks' gut reaction to what they're seeing) is misleading.

    1. The author of this editorial claims that there is moral value in using the emissions made by a human body over the course of its lifetime in determining if one should be given life. Making a departure from natural selection, and from sexual attraction and ignoring maternal instinct and cultural familial practices and norms. He proposes that the act of being alive can be measured in its impact upon others who will share the future climate them and since the impact is not 0 then there must be an upper limit of "too many". Immorally, he does not include a measure of "too few" and does not make any mention of the problems society has with exponential population decline. Such as Japan currently selling more adult than infant diapers as their population collapses because of too few children. In fact there is no mention of generational replacement or reproduction rate. Just a simplistic measure of a human impact upon the environment with the entirety of positive impact deleted, omitted, ignored completely. There is in fact no moral high ground in maintaining or promoting the idea that human life has no positive value to the earth. Failing to see ones own value or the value of human life as a whole, rejecting the desire to help human kind survive and prosper and reducing human beings to objects with emissions and no positive output potential is morally reprehensible and not a scientifically sound conclusion, given the observable facts. Among them, that every human being alive on the planet today, standing shoulder to shoulder, would not fill the area of los angeles, and setting aside one acre of our best land for every human being on earth would require an area no arger than texas. There is no scientific basis for concluding there are too many people or that the future humans would benefit from lower population. it is a common error, in the media today, where the impact on climate is evaluated out of the context of all other scilences where positive impacts and negative impacts of human life are observable. Such as biological sciences or earth sciences. it is true, that if we lived on a gas giant, where the only element of the planetary ecosystem was the climate, then such an evaluation of our "carbon footprint" would be meaningful. but since we have a planet with oceans dryland and predators and dangerous conditions, it is morrally reprehensible to suggest our population not maximize its potential to survive to see the future so many are trying to protect by literally throwing their babies out with the bathwater. It is impossible to contribute to the well-being of human life in editorial if you do not have a love of human life. My heart goes out to anyone who takes this article seriously. You do not have to limit your fertility to help humankind survive.

  20. Nov 2022
    1. unused classes

      again: unmatched class selectors

      additionally, it's not the fact that they are unmatched (or that they are class selectors specifically) that it's a problem—it's the fact that there are a lot of them

      the entire choice of focusing on classes and class selectors here is basically a red herring

    1. J. Russell Ramsay, Ph.D.

      Prof of clinical psychology in psychiatry. Specializes in CBT for ADHD. Think I orginally learned about from mentions by Russell Barkley, and listened to conversations of the ADHD reWired podcast

    1. Meta-analysis statistical procedures provide a measure of the difference between two groups thatis expressed in quantitative units that are comparable across studies

      The units are only "comparable across studies" if there weren't any mishaps (eg, clinical or methodological heterogeneity). If there's clinical heterogeneity, then we're probably comparing apples to oranges (ie, either participants, interventions, or outcomes are different among studies). If there's methodological heterogeneity, then that means there's a difference in study design

    2. Quadrants I and II: The average student’s scores on basic skills assessments increase by21 percentiles when engaged in non-interactive, multimodal learning (includes using textwith visuals, text with audio, watching and listening to animations or lectures that effectivelyuse visuals, etc.) in comparison to traditional, single-mode learning. When that situationshifts from non-interactive to interactive, multimedia learning (such as engagement insimulations, modeling, and real-world experiences – most often in collaborative teams orgroups), results are not quite as high, with average gains at 9 percentiles. While notstatistically significant, these results are still positive.

      I think this is was Thomas Frank was referring to in his YT video when he said "direct hands-on experience ... is often not the best way to learn something. And more recent cognitive research has confirmed this and shown that for basic concepts a more abstract learning model is actually better."

      By "more abstract", I guess he meant what this paper calls "non-interactive". However, even though Frank claims this (which is suggested by the percentile increases shown in Quadrants I & II), no variance is given and the authors even state that, in the case of Q II (looking at percentile increase of interactive multimodal learning compared to interactive unimodal learning), the authors state that "results are not quite as high [as the non-interactive comparison], with average gains at 9 percentiles. While not statistically significant, these results are still positive." (emphasis mine)

      Common level of signifcances are \(\alpha =.20,~.10,~.05,~.01\)

    1. Contents 1 Overview 2 Reasons for failure 2.1 Overconfidence and complacency 2.1.1 Natural tendency 2.1.2 The illusion of control 2.1.3 Anchoring 2.1.4 Competitor neglect 2.1.5 Organisational pressure 2.1.6 Machiavelli factor 2.2 Dogma, ritual and specialisation 2.2.1 Frames become blinders 2.2.2 Processes become routines 2.2.3 Resources become millstones 2.2.4 Relationships become shackles 2.2.5 Values becomes dogmas 3 The paradox of information systems 3.1 The irrationality of rationality 3.2 How computers can be destructive 3.3 Recommendations for practice 4 Case studies 4.1 Fresh & Easy 4.2 Firestone Tire and Rubber Company 4.3 Laura Ashley 4.4 Xerox 5 See also 6 References

      Wiki table of contents of the Icarus paradox

    1. That's a whole different topic. Mastodon isn't built for single-user instances.

      That's the entire topic, my guy!

      "We should be optimising Mastodon so it incentivises more serve[r]s with fewer people." is the very premise of the conversation!

      Mastodon "push[ing] the direction of the protocol or make it harder to cultivate an ecosystem of smaller ones."? "it needs to be easier to start smaller ones"? Are you just not paying attention to the conversations you're responding to?

      Reminds me of:

      What fascinated me was that, with every single issue we discussed, we went around in a similar circle — and Kurt didn’t seem to see any problem with this, just so long as the number of 2SAT clauses that he had to resolve to get a contradiction was large enough.

      https://scottaaronson.blog/?p=232

    1. layers of wat are essentially hacks to build something resembling a UI toolkit on top of a document markup language

      So make your application document-driven (i.e. actually RESTful).

      It's interesting that we have Web forms and that we call them that and yet very few people seem to have grokked the significance of the term and connected it to, you know, actual forms—that you fill out on paper and hand over to someone to process, etc. The "application" lies in that latter part—the process; it is not the visual representation of any on-screen controls. So start with something like that, and then build a specialized user agent for it if you can (and if you want to). If you find that you can't? No big deal! It's not what the Web was meant for.

    1. Socrates is turned into a systematic set of psycho-technologies that you internalise into your metacognition. So, what became crucial for Plato, as we saw, was argumentation. But for Antisthenes the actual confrontation with Socrates was more important. Both Plato and Antisthenes are interested in the transformation that Socrates is affording.Plato sees this happening through argumentation. Antesthenes sees it as happening through confrontation because... And you can see how they're both right, because in Socratic elenchus, Socrates comes up and he argues with you. But of course he's also confronting you. We talked about how he was sort of slamming the Axial revolution into your face! So, Antesthenes has a follower, Diogenes, and Diogenes epitomizes this: This confrontation. And by looking at the kinds of confrontation we can start to see what the followers of Antesthenes are doing. So Diogenes basically does something analogous to provocative performance art. He gets in your face in a way that tries to provoke you to realizations. Those kinds of insights that will challenge you. He tries to basically create aporia in you, that shocked experience that you had when confronting Socrates that challenges you to radically transform your life. But instead of using argumentation and discussion, as Socrates did and Plato picked up on, they were really trying to hone in on how to try to be as provocative as possible.

      John Vervaeke on Socrates becoming set of psychotechnologies to internalize and augment metacognition. Agues agumentation become central for Plato, whereas confrontation itself become central for Antisthenes. They're disagree about how the cause of the transformation through the Socratic approach

      Unclear is stoics take up Plato's mantle of argumentation orientation, but they at least seem distinct from the Cynics (Antisthenes & teach Diogenes

      Aporia is moment of shock from experience that you're radically transformed. Could be from Diogenes' provocative performance art or through discourse a la Plato & Socrates

      Nietzche may have favored Cynics approach over stoic/Socratic. Possible parallel in left-hand path and right-hand path. Quick & risky vs. slow & steady

    1. Google Scholar is needed to access annotations in context "Listen to the noise: noise is beneficial for cognitive performance in ADHD"

    2. The most intriguing result in the present study is thepositive effect of white noise on performance for theADHD children. This noise effect was present in boththe non-medicated and medicated children. Thissupports the MBA (Moderate Brain Arousal) model(Sikstro ̈m & So ̈derlund, 2007), suggesting that theendogenous (neural) noise level in children withADHD is sub-optimal. MBA accounts for the noise-enhancing phenomenon by stochastic resonance(SR). The model suggests that noise in the environ-ment introduces internal noise into the neural sys-tem through the perceptual system. Of particularimportance, the MBA model suggests that the peakof the SR curve depends on the dopamine level, sothat participants with low dopamine levels (ADHD)require more noise for optimal cognitive performancecompared to controls.

      Author's self-described "most intriguing result"

    3. It has long been known that cognitive processing iseasily disturbed by noise and other distractors(Broadbent, 1958).

      Known for who? General populations? Specific subpopulations?

    4. The MBAmodel predicts that noise enhances memory perfor-mance for ADHD and attenuates performance forcontrols. We will also argue for a link between theeffects of noise, dopamine regulation, and cognitiveperformance.

      Prediction of Moderate Brain Arousal model and author's additional argument.

    5. Results: Noise exerted a positive effect on cognitive performance forthe ADHD group and deteriorated performance for the control group, indicating that ADHD subjectsneed more noise than controls for optimal cognitive performance

      Explains why studies on music at general population have conflicting results (ie, general decrease in capacity to focus with noisy environment). Wonder if this relates to atonal or discordant and dissonant music (free jazz, avant-guarde, etc) or polyrhythmic and odd metered time signatures

    1. I have a suspicion that you're not putting the source for the specific versions of glibc and Linux you used into every one of your projects.

      Why are people so seduced by this dumb argument—to the point that they almost seem proud of it?

      First, it's presumptuous. Who says we're even using glibc instead of some other libc—which I just might choose to include in the projects I work on? Who says we're even using Linux, for that matter?

      Secondly, even if we were, let's assume that we're not, and then see if that teaches us anything about the overall line of reasoning. The original comment was about NPM. NPM is used a fair bit for not just backend stuff but for managing packages used in the browser, too. Let's assume, for simplicity, that our program is entirely a browser-based JS+HTML+CSS app with no backend to speak of. Would the same people argue that, among other things, the Web browser sources would need to be included? Does it even make sense to argue that? Asking the system software question betrays a failure to accurately grapple with the classes of software artifacts we're dealing with, their role in the overall project, and our responsibility for them.

  21. Oct 2022
    1. This shifts the responsibility of checking which posts are new new/updated onto the parser

      For checking which posts are new/updated, this is always the case. The only thing the HTTP cache-related headers can tell is that the feed itself has/hasn't changed.

    1. That's an interesting point about empirical testing. If you just ask lawyers and judges in the abstract whether they'd like citations up in the body or down in footnotes, they'll vote for the former. But if you show them actual examples of well-written opinions in which the citations are subordinated, the results are very different.
    1. In the past whenwe attempted to share it, we foundourselves spending more time gettingoutsiders up to speed than on our ownresearch. So I finally had to establishthe policy that we will not provide thesource code outside the group
    1. yogachara theory and i'm thinking here about three nature theory and three naturelessness theory suggests to us that we are simply wired for certain illusions and among them is 00:29:19 the illusion of immediacy um and we're wired to thematize our experience through the framework of subject object duality i often compare this to the way that we're wired for certain 00:29:31 optical illusions for instance you don't have to learn to see the mueller liar illusion as an illusion we all see it as an illusion and it's because of the way our visual system has evolved and there are lots of other optical illusions like 00:29:44 that the color five phenomenon for instance and so forth yogachara really takes very seriously the idea that from beginning with time we've evolved karmic predispositions to certain kinds of 00:29:55 illusions and these are some of them and of course a little bit of reflection shows that that duality has to be illusory um after all um we are 00:30:09 not subject pure subjects standing outside of the world of our experience confronting a world of objects some of them outer and some of them inner that's the vedanta position that ain't the buddhist position instead what we are is 00:30:24 organisms and again i will set aside all of the debates we might have about how those organisms are constituted but we are organisms embedded in an environment and our bodies our sense faculties are 00:30:37 part of the world in which we find ourselves as a consequence our subjectivity our own engagement with the world is constituted not by standing outside and detecting things but rather by being 00:30:51 embedded in the world and the only way that we could possibly become aware of any object whether it's a tree or an apple or a thought or a feeling is to construct that as an object in our field 00:31:04 of consciousness even if in doing so we manage to hide from ourselves the fact that we are constructing it

      yogacara theory holds that we are hard-wired for the illusion of immediacy and to see from subject/object dualism, even though part of us know we are embedded in the world and not completely separate from it.

      !- critical insight : suffering - we manage to hide the fact that we construct the object we experience from ourselves

      Example of this illusion of immediacy is how we have so many visual illusions.

    2. this is not to say that our inner life has some kind of a second grade um existence conventional reality is not 00:25:14 second level reality um because as the guardian and chandra kirti also emphasized we must remember that conventional reality dependent 00:25:26 origination is exactly the same as emptiness which is ultimate reality the only kind of reality anything that we ever encounter is going to have is conventional reality so when i'm talking 00:25:38 here about cognitive illusion i'm not arguing that the existence of our interstates um is illusory i'm arguing that the illusion is that we have immediate access to them as they are and 00:25:51 that their mode of existence um is um intrinsic existence so this allows us to understand the majority analysis of the most fundamental cognitive illusion 00:26:04 of all the illusion of the immediacy of our knowledge of our own minds and the givenness of our own interstates and processes our direct knowledge of them as the kinds of things they are independent of 00:26:18 any concepts that's the illusion that wittgenstein quine and sellers each in there worked so hard in the 20th century to diagnose and to cure but we can put this just as easily and maybe more 00:26:31 easily in the terms of second century indian madhyamaka the fundamental cognitive illusion is to take our mental states to exist intrinsically rather than conventionally and to take our knowledge of them to be 00:26:45 immediate independent of conventions this illusion is pervasive it is instinctive and it is profoundly self-alienating because it obscures the deeply conventional character of our own 00:26:57 existence and of our self-knowledge and this illusion is what according to buddhist philosophers lies at the root of our grasping of our attraction and diversion and hence at the root of the 00:27:09 pervasive suffering of existence

      This fundamental illusion of immediacy lay at the root of our ignorance in the world. We mistaken our mental states to exist intrinsically instead of conventionally. We don't think they depend on language, but they do, in a very deep way.

      From a Deep Humanity perspective, even our instantly arisen mental states are part of the symbolosphere..mediated by the years of language conditioning of our culture.

      !- critical insight of : Buddhist philosophy - we take our mental states to exist intrinsically rather than conventionally - this illusion is pervasive, instinctive and profoundly self-alienating and lay at the root of all suffering Our language symbols are our model through which we interpret reality. We inhabit the symbolosphere but we mistaken it for intrinsic reality.

    3. there's a second kind of cognitive illusion this first cognitive illusion as i've suggested is thematized both in buddhist philosophy and in western philosophy but the second 00:07:06 kind of illusion i find not thematized so much in the west though in some quarters it is some but not all but very much stabilized in in buddhist philosophy and that is the superimposition of subject object 00:07:19 duality um and when we do that um we take the nature of our experience to be primordially structured as subject standing outside of the world viewing an 00:07:31 object now we always know we know that on the slightest bit of reflection that that's crazy that we are biological organisms embedded in a physical world and that 00:07:43 all of our experience is the result of that embodied embedded and embedded experience in the world it's still however almost irresistible to have that kind of image of ourselves as wittgenstein put it as like the eye 00:07:56 to the visual field that we stand outside of the world as pure subject with everything else taken as object and that reflexive taking of experience that way is a very profound kind of cognitive 00:08:09 illusion one that is extremely hard to shake to overcome illusion though we first have to come to know that illusion better you need to know your enemy in 00:08:21 order to defeat your enemy and so i'm going to spend a lot of time trying to acquaint us with the nature of these illusions that is to say if we want to avoid a pointless trek through the